Biosc 490/ 871 - ELECTRON AND LIGHT MICROSCOPY FOR LIFE SCIENTISTS
Offered every Fall term with Darryl Krueger

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This course offers a theoretical and practical introduction to the various forms of light and electron microscopy that are available to life scientists. Students learn operating principles, techniques, and biological applications of each instrument.  The course considers the various forms of light (e.g. polarization, interference, phase contrast, etc) and fluorescence microscopy, including laser scanning (confocal)  microscopy  Electron microscopy topics include scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Basic aspects of digital image acquisition and processing are discussed.


Biosc 490-002, L490-002           BASIC MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUES    
Biosc 872- 001                          ADVANCED MICROSCOPY LABORATORY   
Offered every Spring term with Darryl Krueger

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This course provides practical instruction and laboratory experience and training in LSM-Confocal, SEM and TEM for both undergraduate and graduate students.  Students work on instructor approved projects with the goal to become independent end-users of the advanced microscopes that are available at the Jordan Imaging facility and at the CU electron microscopy laboratory located at AMRL.  Prerequisites: completion of the theoretical EM course and permission of the instructor. 

Senior Seminar course offerings

Biosc 493 - RESTORATION OF THE WORLD OCEAN ECOSYSTEM
First offered in Summer, 2005

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This course examines the ecological status of the world ocean ecosystem. Students discuss and assess the state of the oceanic ecosystem and examine global strategies to help restore our planet’s health. Assigned bookOcean’s End: Travel through endangered seas by Colin Woodward (2000) Basic Books, New York, NY

Biosc 493 – EMERGING DISEASES IN THE POST 911 WORLD
First offered in Spring, 2005

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This course examines the realities of emerging infectious diseases in a world that is overburdened with exponential human population growth.  In the bleak light of the post 911 era, it is imperative for students to discern the differences between infectious diseases and the bioterrorist threat. As a free people, nothing less than our personal liberties and freedoms depend upon an informed polity. Assigned Book: The Coming Plague: Newly emerging diseases in a world out of balance by Laurie Garrett (1994) Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, NY.


Biosc 493 - BIOLOGY OF ABRUPT CLIMATE CHANGE AND GLOBAL WARMING
New offering for Spring 2006 term

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This course explores the two realities of abrupt climate change and global warming; the physical which is defined as a transition of the climate system into a different state (of temperature, rainfall, and other aspects) on a time scale that is faster than the responsible forcing; and the biological, which is  the change of the climate system that is faster than the adaptation time of social and/or ecosystems.  Assigned book: The Weather Makers; How man is changing the climate and what it means for life on Earth by Tim Flannery (2005) Atlantic Monthly Press, New York, NY

Other recent offerings:

BIOSC 871- COMMUNICATING SCIENCE TO NON-SCIENTISTS
First offered in Spring 2005 with Peter Kent

Science is deeply embedded in daily life and is increasingly vital to the nation's economic growth and quality of life. Despite science's impact, society has a love-hate relationship with it. The public embrace the products and distrust the processes. The lack of understanding poses a challenge to a democracy, science policy and a knowledge-based economy.  For scientists the ability to communicate with non-scientists has become a priority for professional advancement, public support and personal development. This course introduces skills and tools for the scientist to communicate effectively to the public and other audiences.  Assigned book: A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson (2003) Random House, New York, NY.

BIOSC 200 - BIOLOGY IN THE NEWS
First offered in Spring 2006 with Jerry Waldvogel and Ken Revis-Wagner

This course provides students with an opportunity to see the direct application of science to everyday life as reported in the popular press.  The class focused its analysis on three major topics; Evolution and Creationism, lead by Waldvogel; Cloning and Stem cells lead by Revis-Wagner and Global warming and Climate change lead by Mount.   Small groups of students lead class discussions which explore the underlying biology and technology associated with the topic, and considered the political, legal, economic, and social implications of the issue.  In the process students hone critical thinking skills and became more capable consumers of scientific information.