College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities

Faculty Bio

Manganelli, Kimberly Snyder

Position
Associate Professor, 19th-century British and American literature

Contact
Office: 807 Strode
Phone: (864) 656-5408
Email: kmangan@clemson.edu

Focus: Nineteenth-Century British and American Literature

Research Interests
Kim Manganelli received her PhD from Cornell University in 2006 where she specialized in nineteenth-century British and American literature. Her current book project, "Transatlantic Spectacles of Race: The Tragic Mulatta and the Tragic Muse," investigates the powerful connections between the construction of racial identity and the trafficking of female sexuality in the nineteenth-century American and British marketplace. Her research interests also include eighteenth-century British literature, race and gender studies, and the history of the novel.

Selected Professional Works

Books (Published)

Transatlantic Spectacles of Race: The Tragic Mulatta and the Tragic Muse. Rutgers University Press, Fall 2011. Forthcoming.

Journal Articles & Book Chapters (Published)

“The Tragic Mulatta Plays the Tragic Muse,” Victorian Literature and Culture 37.2 (September 2009): 501-522. Awarded the 2010 Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies (INCS) Essay Prize

“The Tragic Mulatta Plays the Tragic Muse,” Victorian Literature and Culture 37.2 (September 2009): 501-522.

Journal Articles & Book Chapters (Accepted or Submitted)

“Woman in White: The Tragic Mulatta and British Sensation Fiction,” Transatlantic Sensations, eds. John Barton and Jennifer Phegley. (Forthcoming)

“Woman in White: The Tragic Mulatta and British Sensation Fiction,” Transatlantic Sensations, eds. John Barton and Jennifer Phegley. Ashgate Press Ltd. Fall 2011. Forthcoming in.

Conference Presentations (Delivered)

“George Eliot’s ‘Girl-Tragedies’: The Specters of American Slavery and Sensation Fiction in Daniel Deronda,” Transatlantic Exchanges between New England and Britain, 1600-1900 Conference, Plymouth, United Kingdom, July 2010.

“The San Domingue Revolution and the Evolution of Genre in Leonara Sansay’s Zelica, the Creole,” American Comparative Literature Association, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 2010. [This presentation was part of the "Fictions of Haiti" seminar co-organized with Angela Naimou]