Planning, Development and Preservation

Landscapes

Drayton Hall Site Study

Drayton Landscape LayoutThe spring 2010 cultural landscape class focused on surveying techniques, as well as the history of the gardens and grounds of Drayton Hall and the development of the larger regional context. Topics such as typical gardens of the era and urban/suburban growth challenges were also studied. The information will be combined with work from the undergraduate classes to aid the staff of Drayton Hall in continuing to create a more complete picture of the site’s history.

Click here for larger pdf version of Drayton Hall landscape.

Ashtabula Plantation Site Plan

Ashtabula site planAs a group of teams, students created a site plan, including vegetation, way-finding and accessory buildings of the plantation house at Ashtabula in Pendleton, S.C., currently operated by the Pendleton Historical Society. Ashtabula built c. 1820, like other farms and plantations in the Upstate area, was a summer retreat for an established Charleston family. Today, it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and operated as a house museum with limited access to the grounds.

Several of the plans and guiding documents branded the historic site as a place for families to enjoy the outdoors through the site’s proposed hiking trails, interpretive signs and natural vegetation. One team sought to bring back the grazing cow known to have inhabited the front yard for many years!

Student drawing from the Ashtabula projectOur mission statement for Ashtabula:
Located on a Cherokee road within Pendleton, South Carolina, a prosperous upstate summer community, Ashtabula, a 1790s tavern and adjacent 1825 farmhouse with multiple dependencies, represents southern roadside accommodations and the evolution of agricultural lifestyles from 1825 to the mid-20th century.

Formerly used for cattle, dairy and tree farming, Ashtabula is a farm and it will be preserved as such. The property is a vernacular haven and as Ashtabula continues into the future, it will remain a landscape that exemplifies local characteristics.




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