Special Populations

 

Like all students, Asian American students are at risk for suicide. The term “Asian American” refers to a great diversity of cultures and countries of origin. Suicide rates and levels of risk can vary greatly. However, many Asian American students have stable households, close families, and values emphasizing success and education. Students, especially Asian Americans, often feel ashamed if they are experiencing emotional or relationship problems, and may feel that seeking help for these kinds of problems is a sign of weakness. For Asian American students in particular, lack of relational attachments, feelings of worthlessness, and hopelessness have been associated with thoughts of suicide. Problems related to school and academic performance have shown to be correlated with students who complete suicide.


In addition to cross-cultural Risk Factors, Asian American students may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • Prejudice, intercultural conflict, or discrimination

  • Conflicts with parents or feeling rejected by them

  • A recent loss (e.g., death or break-up)

  • Financial concerns

  • Traumas, such as those often reported by refugees

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Additional Helpful Resources

Clemson Clubs for Asian American Students


National Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Emory University. (N.D.). Emory Cares For You: Website

Ohio State University. (N.D.). Suicide Prevention for Asian American College Students: Fact sheet

 spanish hotline

Línea de crisis de prevención del suicidio
1-888-628-9454

Like all students, Latino students are at risk for suicide. Latino students often have stable households, close-knit families and strong spiritual beliefs. However, statistics indicate that Latino college and graduate/professional school–aged individuals are at a higher risk for attempting suicide than individuals from many other ethnic groups. Latino university-aged females report some of the highest rates of depression, and Latino males under 25 are at an increased risk for completing suicide. Among Latino groups, research shows that Puerto Ricans, in particular, have disproportionately high rates of suicidal behavior.


Family and/or familism are very important among the Latino population. Stress or conflict in these areas often play a crucial part in suicidal ideation and attempts. A strong sense of family is also one of the most important protective factors for this population.


In addition to cross-cultural Risk Factors, Latino students may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • Underutilization of mental health services: access and use

  • Acculturative stress and family conflict

  • Alienation

  • Hopelessness and fatalism

  • Discrimination

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Additional Helpful Resources

Clemson / Local Resources


National Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Source: Emory University: Emory Cares For You, N.D

Source: Suicide Prevention Resource Center. (2013). Suicide among racial/ethnic populations in the U.S.:
Hispanics. Waltham, MA: Education Development Center, Inc.

Like all students, African American students are at risk for suicide. Though the African American population has historically had a low rate of suicide, the rate for African American college age males has more than doubled in recent years. African American college students report a low utilization of counseling services due to concerns about:

  • Stigma and prejudice

  • Over-pathologizing by mental health professionals

  • Concerns that family members, peers, or professors might learn that they sought counseling help

In addition to cross-cultural Risk Factors, African American students may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • Isolation from family or spiritual community

  • Prejudice, racial tension, or discrimination

  • A recent loss (e.g., death or break-up)

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section


You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Helpful Resources

Clemson/Local Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Ohio State University. (N.D.). Suicide Prevention for African American College Students: Fact sheet.

Like all students, Muslim students are at risk for suicide. Knowledge of suicide occurrence within the Muslim culture is limited due to cultural beliefs about suicide as well as a lack of research and reporting. Additionally, stigma and legal issues may interfere with help seeking behaviors.

In addition to cross-cultural Risk Factors, Muslim students may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • Prejudice or discrimination

  • Inter-cultural conflict

  • An academic problem

  • A recent loss (e.g., death or break-up)

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Helpful Resources

Clemson/Local Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Ohio State University. (N.D.). Suicide Prevention for Muslim College Students: Fact sheet.

Like all students, international students are at risk for suicide. Widely-held beliefs about counseling and mental health in many cultures may negatively impact international students' help-seeking behavior, thus increasing the risk of suicide. Additionally, international students may be dealing with a number of unfamiliar or challenging experiences, such as

  • Adjusting to a new culture

  • Using a foreign language

  • Learning new social interactions

  • Feeling misunderstood

  • Having limited local support

In addition to cross-cultural Risk Factors, international students may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • Prejudice, inter-cultural conflict

  • A new educational system, language barriers

  • A recent loss (e.g., death or break-up)

  • Fears about seeking help; shame in seeking mental health services

  • Acculturative stress and adjustment difficulties such as homesickness and culture shock

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Helpful Resources

Clemson/Local Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Ohio State University. (N.D.). Suicide Prevention for International College Students: Fact sheet.

 lgbtq hotline

The Trevor Project
Hotline for LGBTQ Students
1-866-488-7386
thetrevorproject.org

TrevorText - Available Fridays (4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.). Text “Trevor” to 1-202-304-1200.

TrevorChat - Available 7 days a week (3:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. ) http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/get-help-now#tc

Like all students, LBGTQ (Lesbian, Bi-sexual, Gay, Transgendered, and Queer/Questioning) students are at risk for suicide. Though research findings vary, there is research-based consensus that LBGTQ college students are one of the groups at high risk for suicide. Additionally, LBGTQ individuals who are “coming out” are at increased risk for depression, substance abuse, and suicide.

In addition to general Risk Factors, student members of the LBGTQ community may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • Being misunderstood

  • Victimization/bullying

  • Severed friendships and/or familial ties during the coming out period

  • Lack of support

  • Rejection

  • Lack of connectedness, feelings of isolation

  • Prejudice, discrimination, homophobia

  • Conflicting religious and/or cultural beliefs

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Additional Helpful Resources

Clemson Area Resources

  • CAPS appointment site, which after an initial assessment students can be enrolled in support groups specific to the LGBTQ population

  • The Clemson Gay-Straight Alliance or CGSA

  • Clemson Alumni Society for Equality (CASE)
    Focus on Clemson alumni who belong to this population and are involved in collaboration between current Clemson students and the alumni.

  • Ally Training
    The mission of Ally Training is to make Clemson University a more welcoming and inclusive place for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning [LGBTQ] students, faculty, and staff. Ally Training aims to increase awareness and understanding of LGBTQ issues and to train allies to stand with, and advocate for, LGBTQ people.

  • Upstate Pride
    Has multiple resources to connect people with the LGBTQ community in the upstate (Spartanburg)

  • Gender Benders
    Provides a support community for LGBTQ individuals

  • Out & About Upstate
    Connects individuals with others who are a part of the LGBTQ and provides a comfortable and familiar environment, creates relationships between members of the community (Spartanburg)

  • Parents, Family, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG):
    Provides a support group to the LGBTQ community and their families and friends (Spartanburg)

  • The Peace Congregational Church
    Accepting and supporting of the LGBTQ community. They are involved in a "Clemson University Safe Zone Program" which is devoted to increasing awareness for the LGBT community. They offer workshops for the education of a better understanding of the LGBT community.

  • New Church
    The mission of New Church is to be an open, affirming and charismatic church that focuses on loving and caring for all people, excellence in ministry through worship arts and creativity, outreach and relational ministries (youth, kids, men, women, LGBT, etc.), and helping people grow in their own relationship God while assisting them to become all that God has created them to be.


National Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Emory University. (N.D.). Emory Cares 4 You: Web page.

Ohio State University. (N.D.). Suicide Prevention for GLBT Students: Fact sheet.

By gender, women have a higher rate of suicide attempts than men.  However, men have a suicide completion rate of three to four times that of women.   Unfortunately, men have traditionally been reluctant to talk about their feelings and seek help.  Compared to women, men tend to have higher levels of isolation, greater misuse of drugs and alcohol and greater risk of impulsive and destructive behaviors.  Men can help influence each other positively through group discussions about health.


Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section


You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.


Additional Helpful Resources


Bring Change 2 Mind. This site raises awareness around the unique challenges men face when discussing mental health and encourages pen dialogue to promote health seeking behavior.

Men's Health Resource Center. This site provides information on anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and stress.

Your Head:  An Owner's Manual.  This resource is a guide for men to understanding and overcoming depression, anxiety and stress.

National Institutes of Health: Public Service Announcements on Men & Health

 

 

National Institutes of Health: Real Men, Real Depression Fact Sheets:

Center for Suicide Prevention:

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Bring Change 2 Mind (N.D.). Public Service Announcements

Disabilities can increase suicide risk among college students. These include physical, emotional, or cognitive disabilities. Students with disabilities often deal with prejudice or discrimination as well as problems feeling independent, which can increase suicide risk.

In addition to general Risk Factors, students with disabilities may experience the following Risk Factors:

  • The absence of caretakers while learning to become increasingly self-sufficient

  • The severity and visibility of a disability

  • Holding persistent beliefs of achieving full health and/ or ability

  • A disability that is acquired

  • An unwillingness to seek help because of mental health stigma

  • A denial of the disability

  • Feelings of conflict between one’s self-concept and one’s disability

  • Stopping medication or treatment for a disability

 

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.

 

Additional Helpful Resources

Clemson/Local Resources

For more information, visit our Resource Section.


Ohio State University Suicide Prevention

 veterans hotline

Veterans Crisis Line
1-800-273-8255 (Press 1)
Chat

Text to 838255
veteranscrisisline.net

Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available 

Although college contains stressors for many students, there can be additional stressors and risk factors for students that are also veterans of military service. It has been shown that male veterans are twice as likely as civilian men to die by committing suicide. In addition, women veterans die by suicide at three times the rate than the general population. It is reported that nearly 20 percent of service members return with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Major Depression. Therefore, it is very important to know and understand the warning signs and know what to do to help.


In addition to the general Risk Factors for suicide, veteran students face other risk factors including:

  • Frequent deployments

  • Deployments to hostile environments

  • Exposure to extreme stress

  • Physical/sexual assault while in the service (not limited to women)

  • Length of deployments

  • Service-related injury

  • Reintegration difficulties upon transition to civilian life

  • Marital/family stressors

  • Stigma towards help-seeking

  • Career concerns

Sometimes a crisis may involve suicide ideation. These are some warning signs that may appear:

  • Hopelessness, feeling like there’s no way out

  • Anxiety, agitation, sleeplessness or mood swings

  • Feeling like there is no reason to live

  • Rage or anger

  • Engaging in risky activities without thinking

  • Increasing alcohol or drug abuse

  • Withdrawing from family and friends

Remember, you are not alone.  There is help.  There is hope.  See our Resource Section

You can help prevent suicide.  See the Warning Signs and learn What To Do.

Additional Helpful Resources

 

Clemson Area and Local Area Resources

Clemson Student Veterans Association

Clemson Student Veteran Resource Center


Clemson Veterans Writing Group 

  • Weekly support group

  • Writing, sharing and discussing

  • Relevant military and veteran prompts and topics

  • Open to veterans, dependents and supporters

  • No writing experience required

  • Goal of the group is to Connect, Create and Cope

  • 2016 spring semester meetings: Tuesdays, 4:45 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. in 206 Strode Tower

  • Contact: Brennan Beck, bjbeck@clemson.edu


Upstate Warrior Solution
864-520-2073

 

National Resources

Veterans Crisis Line
800-273-8255
Chat/text

The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1chat online or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

 

The Veterans Self-Check Quiz is a safe, easy way to learn whether stress and depression might be affecting you. This service is completely confidential.

 

Click to watch videos from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations about reaching out for help.


US Military Matters

Free online trainings (webinars) and resources for mental health providers and National Guard and Reserve Members and their families; trainings include topics such as posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, military culture/life, sleep problems, suicide, military sexual trauma, problem solving and substance abuse.

 

For more information, visit our Resource Section.

You are not alone in grieving the loss of a loved one to suicide. Many people are grieving with you. Here are some common questions and some resources to help you cope with your loss. 

 

If you’ve lost someone to suicide, you may feel . . . 

 

. . . alone, as though no one understands what you’re going through. 

 

. . . shocked, even if you knew your loved one was at risk. You may find yourself replaying their last days over and over, searching for clues.

 

. . . responsible, wondering whether there was something you missed, or something you could have said or done, or wished you hadn’t said or done.

 

. . . angry, at whoever you believe is to blame: the doctor, therapist, spouse, boss, or principal, for example.

 

. . . abandoned by the person who died.

 

. . . ashamed and worried about whether to tell people the truth, for fear of being judged.

 

. . . guilty for laughing, having fun, or beginning to enjoy life again.

 

. . . relieved.

 

Don’t worry. It is normal to have some, all, or none of these feelings as you cope with suicide loss.  It can help to find support.  It can also help to see a therapist.  

Common Questions

Why?
One of the first questions almost everyone asks after a suicide is, why? Why would someone you love end their own life? How could I not have seen this coming? Suicide is complicated, and it almost always leaves many questions unanswered. Often, we never learn exactly why our loved one took their life. But we can find help to find our way through this tragedy and support to go on living our own lives.

 

Where can I find support?
Support is available if you want to connect with others to cope with loss. 

 

Clemson Counseling and Psychological Services
(864) 656-2451

Mental Health Association of Greenville County
(864) 467-3344

 

Support Groups:

Anderson
Name of Group: Survivors of Suicide
Crisis Ministries
217 St. John St.
Anderson, SC 29624
(864) 226-0297
Contact Person: Roxanne Elkins
(864) 271-8888
Meetings per Month: Two
Fee: No

 

Greenville
Name of Group: Survivors of Suicide
Mental Health Association of Greenville County
Providence Presbyterian Church
4000 Highway 153
Greenville, SC 29611
Contact Person:
(864) 271-8888
Becky Kay
(864) 605-1011, ext 10
sos@mhagc.org
Website: www.mhagc.org
Meetings per Month: One - First Tuesday, 7 to 9 p.m.
Fee: No

 

National Resources

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

American Association of Suicidology

Live Through: a series of portraits and true stories of suicide attempt survivors created by artist and suicide awareness advocate Dese'Rae L. Stage

United Suicide Survivors International, Inc.


For more information, visit our Resource Section.


American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. (N.D.) Coping with Suicide Loss