Accessibility Standard

The web has great potential for people with disabilities. With minimal effort from you, students with disabilities would be able to take courses online, be active participants in the classes, and give better performance.

Why should we design with accessibility in mind, or why should I worry whether our web sites are accessible?

There are three fundamental reasons why we would want to do this

  • It’s the right thing to do. In our society we want everyone to be able to participate to the maximum extent that they can, and we don't want to treat others in an unequal fashion.
  • It’s the smart thing to do.  Accessible design is compatible with emerging technologies. Greater use of wireless web and of portable handhelds means that those sites that are accessible will also be compatible with emerging technologies.
  • It the law. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation act  supports the notion that students should have equal access to the information that's on the web and equal access to educational opportunities.

What should you consider to achieve accessibility?

As you plan your classes you may prepare a course syllabus, readings, and curriculum. As you plan your departmental web pages you may incorporate policies, application forms, admissions, a catalogue of courses, and faculty profiles. In each instance ask yourself:

  • Is my department page and all its elements accessible?
  • Is my course site fully accessible? How about the chat program I use; is it accessible?
  • If I post things like PDF files, or Word files or PowerPoint presentations, are they accessible?
CCIT provides an array of resources-from online and downloadable tutorials designed to help you create accessible web content to tools to help your organization build its capacity to maintain web accessibility.

Get started by using HiSoftware AccVerify to check your web pages for accessibility.