Clemson University Institute for Parks

2010 Award Recipients

The Benton H. Box Award - Dr. Robert E. Manning
The William C. Everhart Award - Shelton A. Johnson
The Dwight A. Holder Award - not awarded this year
The Walter T. Cox Award - not awarded this year
Fran P. Mainella Award - awarded alternate years
The Robert G. Stanton Award - Dr. Antoinette J. Lee

The Benton H. Box Award

The Award is named in appreciation of Dr. Box's distinguished career as an educator/administrator, especially as Dean of the College of Forest and Recreation Resources at Clemson University, which he led to national and international recognition for academic excellence and for leadership in fostering private innovation in resource management. The Award recognizes the teacher who by precept and example inspires in students the quest for knowledge; or the administrator who fosters a learning environment and encourages curriculum innovation to inculcate an "environmental ethic" as the rule of conduct involving resource management, development and utilization; or the private practitioner whose management over a sustained period demonstrates leadership in preserving, enhancing, renewing and restoring a livable environment.

Dr. Benton Box, Dr. Lawrence Allen, Dr. Robert Manning and President James BarkerThe Benton H. Box Award was presented to Dr. Robert E. Manning for recognition as a teacher who by precept and example inspires in students the quest for knowledge and encourages curriculum innovation to inculcate an “environmental ethic” as the rule of conduct.

Dr. Robert Manning is a Professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont where he teaches and conducts a program of research on the history, philosophy, and management of parks, wilderness, and related areas.  He is also Director of the University’s Park Studies Laboratory.  He has published widely on the issues of carrying capacity of parks, outdoor recreation, and park management, and has authored a number of books including Studies in Outdoor Recreation, Reconstructing Conservation, Parks and Carrying Capacity, and Parks and People: Managing Outdoor Recreation at Acadia National Park. 

Bob has spent four year-long sabbatical leaves at Grand Canyon National Park, Yosemite National Park, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and the Washington Office of the National Park Service, all places where he learned how parks really work.  At the University of Vermont, he was instrumental in developing the Rubenstein School’s innovative core curriculum, a series of courses that integrate the natural and social sciences and the traditional fields of study in natural resources, including forestry, wildlife, and outdoor recreation.  He has received a number of awards, including being named a University Scholar by the University of Vermont, the University of Vermont George V. Kidder Outstanding Faculty Award, Michigan State University’s Louis F. Twardzik Distinguished Alumni Award, the George Wright Society Social Science Achievement Award, and next month he will be presented with the Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Award for Excellence in Recreation and Park Research by the National Recreation and Park Association.

Bob’s positive impact in the fields of parks, protected areas, and environmental ethics is in part marked by his numerous publications in leading scientific journals, books, and over 90 management-oriented research projects conducted for the National Park Service, USDA Forest Service, state park agencies, and non-profit conservation groups.  Also, his teaching, interactions, and mentoring of students has changed how we think and act in regards to the protection and management of parks and other conserved lands.  He has taught courses like ‘Nature and Culture’ and ‘Park and Wilderness Management’ to thousands of undergraduate students, and he has chaired a number of master’s and Ph.D. committees.  Many of Bob’s students have gone on to careers in managing national and state parks and forests, and several former doctoral students are on the faculty at a number of leading universities in this field, including Arizona State University, Colorado State University, Virginia Tech University, and Clemson University. 

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The William C. Everhart Award

The Award is named in appreciation of the distinguished career of Bill Everhart as field interpreter, researcher, administrator, author, and creator of the National Park Service's Harpers Ferry Center for creative design and communication, which has received national and international recognition for excellence. The Award recognizes sustained achievements during a career or in a specific episode that illuminate, provide creative insights to, and that foster an appreciation of our natural and cultural heritage.

The William C. Everhart Award was presented to Shelton A. Johnson for sustained achievements in interpretation that have illuminated, created insights to, and fostered an appreciation of our cultural and historic heritage.

Dr. Lawrence Allen, Shelton Johnson and President James BarkerShelton Johnson was born in the Upstate of South Carolina, but grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He has worked for the National Park Service as an Interpretive Ranger since 1987. His work assignments have included, Great Basin National Park, Yellowstone National Park, and several park units within the National Capital Region. He is currently an interpretive ranger in Yosemite National Park.

Shelton is a graduate of the University of Michigan where he received a degree in Poetry. He has won several University of Michigan writing awards including the Roy W. Cowden Memorial Fellowship, a scholarship to the Cranbrook Writer's Conference, Michael Gutterman Award and the Major Hopwood Award in Poetry.

He was selected as a member of the National Park Service delegation to China in 2000, and participated as part of the NPS equestrian unit in the Tournament of Roses Parade the following year. He also was recognized by the Pacific West Region as the Freeman Tilden Award winner, the highest award given by the NPS for Interpretation. He gave the keynote address to the National Interpreters Workshop in 2002, the first by a NPS representative.

Ranger Johnson has become the face of the Buffalo soldiers and has presented his interpretive programs on the role and significance of these cavalry soldiers to a wide array of audiences. He was asked to accept a Resolution passed by the California Legislative Black Caucus honoring the contributions made to Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks by the Buffalo Soldiers in 2003. On June 30, 2005, he received a Cultural Heritage Award from the Center for Law in the Public Interest for his work in educating visitors to Yosemite National Park about the contributions of the Buffalo Soldiers. At this same event, he also received a Commendation from the City of Los Angeles City Council, a Certificate of Appreciation from U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer, and two Certificates of Special Congressional Recognition from members of the U.S. House of Representatives. In 2006, the governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky presented Shelton with a commission as a Kentucky Colonel for his work searching for descendants of the Buffalo Soldiers in the Bluegrass—this is the highest honor awarded by the Commonwealth. Ranger Johnson was most recently featured in the Ken Burns documentary, "National Parks: America's Best Idea."

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The Dwight A. Holder Award

The Award is named in honor of Mr. Holder's illustrious career as an entrepreneur and public servant. As Chairman of the South Carolina Parks, Recreation and Tourism Commission he led South Carolina's parks into a new era of service to the people of South Carolina and the nation. The Award recognizes outstanding work by doctoral candidates in the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management; a member of the Department faculty for original research, scholarly writing, and innovative and inspired teaching; the faculty adviser and graduate student as a team, for initiatives that foster understanding of and provide new insights into the promotion, management, wise use and enjoyment of South Carolina's natural and cultural heritage in perpetuity; and distinguished academic leadership by a member of the Department faculty. (Mr. Holder passed away in Spring 2006).

The Dwight A. Holder Award is awarded for outstanding work as a doctoral student in PRTM and sustained achievement after graduation, management, wise use, and conservation of natural and cultural resources.

This was not awarded this year.

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The Walter T. Cox Award

The Award is so named in appreciation of Dr. Cox's distinguished career in education and public service, especially his tenure as President of Clemson University and as the Director of the Santee-Cooper Authority. The Award recognizes sustained achievement in public service on the firing line, where the public interest meets the private interest in public policy formulation and administration; distinguished leadership and support of innovation in conflict resolution of policy initiatives that enhance the quality of life; personal achievements during a career or in a specific episode that provides inspiration and leadership to others in serving the above purposes.

The Walter T. Cox Award is awarded for sustained achievement in public service providing leadership in administration of public lands and for policy formation affecting our natural and cultural resources.

This was not awarded this year.

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The Fran P. Mainella Award

The Award is named in appreciation of the dynamic career of Fran Mainella as the first woman Director of the National Park Service. As Director, she focused some of her many efforts on creating systems of connected parks and developing innovative partnerships to expand services. Director Mainella was previously the Director of the Florida State Park Service and the Executive Director of the Florida Recreation and Park Association. The Award recognized sustained and innovative achievement by a woman in the management of North America's natural, historic or cultural heritage.

The Fran P. Mainella Award is awarded for sustained and innovative achievement by a woman in the management of North America's natural, historical, or cultural heritage.

This was not awarded this year. 

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The Robert G. Stanton Award

The Award is named in appreciation of the remarkable career of Robert Stanton as the first African-American Director of the National Park Service. Among the many accomplishments of Director Stanton was expansion of the interpretation of diverse cultural meanings inherent in National Parks and increased participation by racial and ethnic minorities as both visitors and employees. The Award recognized sustained and innovative achievement by a member of a racial or ethnic minority in the management of North America's natural, historic and cultural heritage.

The Robert G. Stanton Award was presented to Dr. Antoinette "Toni" J. Lee for sustained and innovative achievement in the management of North  America's natural, historic and cultural heritage.

Dr. Lawrence Allen, President James Barker, Dr. Toni Lee, and Robert Stanton.Dr. Toni Lee received a B.A. degree in history from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in American Civilization from George Washington University. Presently, she is the Assistant Associate Director, Historical Documentation Programs for the National Park Service. In this capacity, she oversees key programs with the national historic preservation program, including the National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmarks, and the Historic American Buildings Survey, among others  She is the founding editor of the biannual National Park Service periodical, CRM: The Journal of Heritage Stewardship, which is published by the National Park Service to expand the intellectual foundation of cultural resource management and reaches 8,000 subscribers in the U.S. and abroad. 
 
In 1998, with the support of Director Robert G. Stanton, she established new National Park Service programs, under the umbrella of the Cultural Resources Diversity Program, that accelerate the process by which the historic preservation/cultural resource field reflects the full diversity of the nation. One of the programs is the Cultural Resources Diversity Internship Program, now in its 12th year. It provides career exploration opportunities for diverse undergraduate and graduate students in cultural resources and historic preservation work. The program also prepared and published African Reflections on the American Landscape:  Identifying and Interpreting Africanisms (2003), Asian Reflections on the American Landscape: Identifying and Interpreting Asian Heritage (2005), and Hispanic Reflections on the American Landscape: Identifying and Interpreting Hispanic Heritage (2009).  She also organized the preparation of Teaching Cultural Heritage Preservation: A Course Outline, which provides curriculum materials for teaching historic preservation, cultural resource stewardship, and related fields to diverse student populations. 

Over her career, she has held other positions with the National Park Service, including six years as a historian with the National Register of Historic Places. For four years, she worked as a historian with the Heritage Preservation Services Division and served as Acting Chief, Preservation Initiatives Branch. For ten years, between 1996 and 2005, she was associated with the M.A. Program in Historic Preservation (MAHP), Goucher College, Baltimore, Maryland, where she taught courses in preservation documentation and fieldwork through distance-learning methods, and served on M.A. thesis committees. In 1999, she established and endowed the annual Stephen K. F. and Katharine W. Lee Prize in honor of her parents, to recognize the best MAHP student project that addresses the preservation of America’s diverse heritage.  

Her major publications include: co-author with Frederick Gutheim, Worthy of the Nation: Washington, DC, From L’Enfant to the National Capital Planning Commission (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 2006), Architects to the Nation: The Rise and Decline of the Supervising Architect’s Office (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000);  co-author, with Pamela Scott, Buildings of the District of Columbia (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993); editor and contributor, Past Meets Future: Saving America's Historic Environments (Washington, DC: The Preservation Press, 1992); and co-editor and contributor, with Robert E. Stipe, The American Mosaic: Preserving a Nation's Heritage (Washington, DC: The U.S. Committee, International Council on Monuments and Sites, 1987).  She has written many articles, essays, and reports on cultural diversity in historic preservation, American architectural history, and the history of Washington, DC.  

Past Award Recipients

Past Lecturers

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