Pearce Center for Professional Communication

Writing Fellows


Writing Fellows, Pearce Center, Clemson University, Clemson South Carolina

Clemson Writing Fellows is based on the assumption that all writers, regardless of background and grade point average, have room for improvement and that peer editing is an effective means of improving student writing.  Research shows that students tend to feel comfortable and grow as writers when working in an established and functional peer editing relationship.  The Clemson Writing Fellows Program aims to build on the strength of our best writers, offer practical experience to the Fellows, and create a climate of academic conversation and revision within some of our most successful early courses. Writing Fellows enroll in a course on the theories of writing pedagogy and process writing as well as the history and evolution of writing instruction and Writing Fellows programs.  As important, though, is the practical work of teaching Writing Fellows to offer useful written feedback and to discuss strategies for revision and improvement with their peers. Writing Fellows, paired with writing intensive courses, comment upon drafts of papers three weeks before the due date, and then meet with each student for a one-on-one conference.  Student writers and Writing Fellows alike learn to see writing not as an act to perform, but as a process with which to engage.

Writing Fellows

  • Lisa Camp
  • Jenny Tumas, Communication Studies/Political Science
  • Jessica Heron, Communication Studies/Marketing
  • Parker Essick, English
  • Alyssa Glazener, English
  • Michaela Reinhart, Biochemistry
  • Haley Nieman, Communication Studies
  • Nathan Ozmint, English
  • Jessica Lau, Bioengineering
  • Farris Johnson
  • Shannon Kay
  • Laura Lamantia
  • Carolina Mercer
  • Rachel Solomon
  • Olivia Souther
  • Jacob Webb
  • Sloane Wiggers
  • “In regards to writing, revision is the process of continuing to develop new ideas and to rework old ideas.  I will write down a lot of ideas, revise those ideas, write a rough draft, revise my ideas and the rough draft, write another draft, revise my style, and turn in the paper.  Before this semester, I would only really write one draft and then change the style.  Now I will write multiple drafts with major differences in idea and work on structure at the very end of the process.”
  • “Revision became a much longer and more intensive process.  It became less about grammar and more about argument and phrasing.  Strategic flow of ideas and concise phrasing became the main things I would look for and alter in revision, which meant that everything could be improved for many drafts.”
  • “Revision is not just grammatical changes, it's argument changes. Rearranging paragraphs, emphasizing a point more and maybe another point less in order to make your argument stronger and clearer to the reader.”
  • “Working with the writing fellow was very helpful, and the experience definitely made me a better writer. Through seeing how he made suggestions for my paper and made revision suggestions, I began to become a better reviser as well.”
  • “The Writing Fellows were very helpful.  Any anxieties I had were due to the weaknesses of my writing. I knew that they would find a lot I needed help with, and sometimes I was anxious about figuring out how to fix that, but by the end of each Writing Fellow conference I was confident about how to move my paper forward.”
  • “I am anxious about getting critiqued on anything--especially my writing, but the fellows were so constructive in their criticisms and happy to help that after the first meeting I wasn't nervous at all.  They did a great job of pointing out areas that could use work and giving suggestions without being demanding or negative.  Very beneficial learning experience.”