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The design group at Clemson University
184 articles in English

[edit] How to Get to the CEDAR Publication Repository

Here is the way most students are going to be successful in making this connection, irrespective of which network you are on, operating system, or where you are (on/off-campus). It needs Novell login.

ON CAMPUS ACCESS:

  1. Log on to Novell. Students will need to use the student ID, the employee ID won't work.
  2. Go to My Computers - you should see a drive with the drive letter M:\ (the server is: \\gs14.clemson.edu\gs14\). Go to that drive, and browse into ME\CEDAR\.
  3. If the browser does not work for you, type this server address: \\gs14.clemson.edu\gs14\me\CEDAR\
  4. Now explore inside the folder CEDAR.
  5. Now create a mapped network drive so that you can get to it easily next time.

OFF CAMPUS ACCESS:
For off-campus access, you will have to first VPN in to the Clemson Network, then log in to Novell. For this, you will need to download and install two applications: (1) CISCO VON Client and (2) Novell Client applications. Both are available from http://www.clemson.edu/ccit/software_applications/software/web_downloads.html

NOTE:
If you are in the CES.CLEMSON.EDU network, you may not need Novell login, but must be in Clemson network. Then start at Step 2.

[edit] CEDAR's Random Research Thoughts Blog

  1. "Scientific hypotheses should be falsifiable" - Karl Popper: Do you agree?
  2. Falsification logic - what is it good for?
  3. Logical Paradoxes and the internal validity of representations - what are your thoughts?
  4. Arrow's impossibility theorem - should design tools be REQUIRED to support team decision?
  5. Logical rigor: "The sheep in Scotland are..." - how important is it in design research?

[edit] CEDAR Brain-Teasers

  1. Take SIX sticks of equal length and make FOUR identical equilateral triangles with each side the length of a stick. [Rubinstein, M.F., and Firstenberg, I.R., (1995), Patterns of Problem Solving, 2nd. Ed., Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.]
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