The Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE Department Announces New Graduate Teaching Assistantship, Recipients

The College of Engineering and Science, in partnership with the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), is proud to announce the inaugural year of the Inquiry, Discovery in Engineering and Science (IDEaS) Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA) Program. The IDEaS GTA program has been developed to meet the needs of increasing Ph.D. stipend levels and providing additional instructional support for General Engineering. This new GTA program will be funded primarily from the ECE department’s online undergraduate program.

IDEaS GTA recipientsThe IDEaS GTA program provides ECE Ph.D. students with annual stipends of $25K. These IDEaS teaching assistantship recipients will be selected each year from top ECE Ph.D. students. Several factors are taken into consideration when the ECE department selects a recipient for the IDEaS GTA program. These factors include the student’s undergraduate academic record, standardized examination scores, and technical-communication skills.

The responsibilities of each IDEaS GTA during the academic year will include serving as a teaching assistant supporting both ECE undergraduate labs and the General Engineering program. Specifically, in the fall semester, the IDEaS GTAs will lead an introductory-level Creative Inquiry project in General Engineering. In the spring semester, the IDEaS GTAs will work in the ENGR 141 course leading a more in-depth, discipline-specific project involving MATLAB and the Lego Mindstorm robotics system. During both summer semesters, the IDEaS GTAs will provide support for the ECE department’s online undergraduate program, and they will interact with undergraduate students by providing online tutorials and help sessions. The IDEaS GTAs will also assist the ECE faculty with course development, thereby gaining valuable educational experience.

Three students have been awarded an IDEaS GTA starting in Fall 2010: Mr. Andrew Clarke, Mr. Douglas Dawson, and Mr. Nicholas Watts. Mr. Clarke received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Clemson University. He is now pursuing the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering with an emphasis in power systems. Mr. Dawson received the B.S. degree in computer engineering from Clarkson University in New York. Mr. Dawson is pursuing the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering with an emphasis in intelligent systems. Mr. Watts, a graduate of Clemson University’s B.S. program in computer engineering, is pursuing the Ph.D. degree in computer engineering with an emphasis in intelligent systems.

For more information on the IDEaS GTA program, view the flyer here.