The Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Xiao-Bang Xu

Xiao-Bang XuProfessor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Ph.D., 1985 - University Mississippi
Electrical Engineering
B.S., 1968 - Tsinghua University, China
Electrical Engineering

Contact Information
Office: 332 Fluor Daniel EIB
Office Phone: 864.656.5923
Fax: 864.656.7220
Email: ecexu@clemson.edu

Professional 
Dr. Xu is a senior member of The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a member of IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, a member of IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, a fellow of Electromagnetics Academy, and a member of Phi Kappa Phi.

Research 
Dr. Xu's research interests are in applied electromagnetic theory and numerical methods. His research interests are mainly in two areas, one of them is in the development of surface/volume integral equation methods and application of the hybrid finite element/boundary integral equation method to study the electromagnetic scattering/radiation near a media interface, which requires an efficient evaluation of Sommerfeld-type integrals. The research findings in this area are expected to be useful for sensing and remote-sensing applications, including detection of buried targets; geophysical exploration; and nondestructive testing of underground facilities.

The other major component of his research is application of electromagnetic theory and numerical techniques in the analysis of power transmission/distribution systems, which are of practical interest. Typical projects are (1) application of Fourier series technique and unimoment method to the investigation of extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields generated by underground power transmission lines; (2) development of numerical techniques, based on finite element method, for computing the zero-sequence of underground pipe-type cables, both (1) and (2) involve modeling of energy penetration through nonlinear magnetic materials; and (3) development of numerical technique and software, based on electromagnetic theory and dynamics, to investigate the probability of magnetically induced subsequent fault in power line topologies. The software he and his graduate students developed is currently being tested and used by a major power company for design of new power transmission/distribution lines and for evaluation of the existing ones.

In the past, Dr. Xu’s research has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Duke Energy Company, and South Carolina Electric and Gas Company.