The Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Undergraduate Research Experience

Students work on a creative inquiry project.

NSF-Sponsored Summer Research Program
The SURE Program in Solid State Devices provides undergraduates from around the United States with a unique opportunity to participate in graduate-level research in the area of solid-state devices and materials under the supervision of a leading faculty researcher in the field. The underlying research paradigm is materials-to-devices, and the program encompasses many aspects of materials and the devices produced from those materials. Although an individual student will focus on more specific aspects of solid-state technology, coordinated activities with other student and faculty participants will broaden that individual experience substantially.

What does the SURE Program allow students to do?

  • Collaborate with faculty mentors on research topics of current interest in electrical and computer engineering
  • Attend seminars on a variety of research topics
  • Experience 10 weeks of graduate-level research before making a firm commitment to graduate school
  • Evaluate and focus their career interests
  • Build friendships with other students
  • Enhance written and oral technical communication skills
  • Earn up to $6,000 during the summer

What are the eligibility requirements of the SURE Program?

  • Undergraduate students in electrical engineering, computer engineering, bioengineering, physics, or materials science programs 
  • One to four academic semesters remaining until graduation at the time of participation in the SURE program
  • U.S. citizenship or permanent-resident status
  • Minimum grade point average of 3.4 out of 4.0

For more information and to apply for the SURE Program in Solid State Devices, visit the program Web site here.

Departmental Summer Research Program
The Departmental Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program provides undergraduates with a unique experience in ECE graduate-level research areas such as: speech and image processing, communications systems, wireless networks, robotics, control systems, computer architecture, VLSI design and testing, semiconductor materials and devices, photonics, fiber optics, microwave circuits, power systems, power electronics, computational electromagnetics, vehicle electronics, and plasma science.

What does the Departmental SURE Program allow students to do?

  • Collaborate with faculty mentors on research topics of current interest in electrical and computer engineering
  • Attend seminars on a variety of research topics
  • Experience 10 weeks of graduate-level research before making a firm commitment to graduate school
  • Evaluate and focus their career interests
  • Build friendships with other students
  • Enhance written and oral technical communication skills
  • Earn up to $5,000 during the summer

What are the eligibility requirements of the Departmental SURE Program?

  • Undergraduate electrical or computer engineering major
  • One to four academic semesters remaining until graduation at the time of participation in the Departmental SURE program
  • U.S. citizenship or permanent-resident status
  • Minimum grade point average of 3.5 out of 4.0


Academic Year Research Program - Creative Inquiry
In the Creative Inquiry Program, undergraduate students pursue scholarly activities individually or in teams under the direction of a faculty member.  These projects may be interdisciplinary.  The objectives of the Creative Inquiry Program are to develop the following capabilities and characteristics in students:
The Creative Inquiry Program in the ECE Department consists of three courses: ECE 299, ECE 399, and ECE 499, which can be taken during the sophomore, junior, and senior years, respectively. In each of these classes, students interact with a faculty member on a project in a subject area which is of mutual interest.   Each of the above courses can carry from one to four credit hours.  Three credit hours of ECE 499 (or ECE H499) can be used to satisfy part of the Technical Elective requirements for either the Electrical Engineering program or the Computer Engineering program.

Since the ECE Creative Inquiry classes are customized for each student or team of students, there is not a "regular outline" as there is for traditional courses.  However, the general outline of activities that will normally be followed in ECE 299, ECE 399, and ECE 499 is as follows:
Normally, outside reading will be required for the student(s) to develop background needed for the project.  This will be directed by the faculty supervisor and will typically include library search and web search. There is also an Honors section associated with each of the above ECE Creative Inquiry courses, which can be taken by students in the Calhoun Honors College who are working on an Honors Thesis.  The Honors versions of the three ECE Creative Inquiry Courses are described below:
ECE H299 - Students will be required to perform a literature search, under the direction of a faculty advisor, on potential topics for an honors thesis.  At the end of the semester students will be required to provide a written report and an oral presentation to summarize their findings.
ECE H399 - Students will be required to perform a literature search, under the direction of a faculty advisor, on potential topics for an honors thesis.   At the end of the semester students will be required to provide a written report and an oral presentation to summarize their findings.  Students will also be required to develop and present a draft outline for an honors thesis.
ECE H499 - Students will be required to write an honors thesis based on research they conduct under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Three credit hours of ECE H499 (or ECE 499) can be used to satisfy part of the Technical Elective requirements for either the Electrical Engineering program or the Computer Engineering program.
More information about Clemson University Creative Inquiry program can be found here.

For more information about the NSF Sponsored Summer Research Program, students should contact:
Rod Harrell Harrell, Rod
Professor
(864)656-5918
Email
For more information about the Departmental Summer Research Program, students should contact:
Daniel Noneaker Noneaker, Daniel
Professor, Grad Program Coordinator
(864)656-0100
Email

For more information about the Academic Year Research Program, students should contact:
John Gowdy Gowdy, John
Professor, Undergrad Program Coordinator
(864)656-5910
Email
A robot in action