General Engineering

Courses

What courses are taught in General Engineering?

    Students solving problems on the white boards

    ENGR 1020 students participating in "active learning" -- solving problems on the white boards rather than listening to lectures.

    ENGR 1410 Students work in teams on robotics projects

    ENGR 1410 students work in teams on a robot programming project.

    Students worth together modeling parts in class

    ENGR 2080 students assist eachother in class while modeling parts and assemblies.

    Creative Inquiry

    Creative Inquiry allows students to participate in hands-on research with engineering faculty.


  • ENGR 1020 - Engineering Disciplines and Skills (2 credits; 1, 2):  Co-req: MTHS 1040 or higher.  Previously called CES 102.  
    • Students spend 3 hours per week in class
    • Students are introduced to the engineering profession, the specific engineering disciplines at Clemson, and other Clemson requirements and opportunities (such as co-op or study abroad)
    • Students learn the fundamentals necessary to build a solid foundation to their engineering career. Topics include:
      • Dimensions and units
      • Graphing
      • Interpolation
    • Students use laptop computers to study spreadsheets, conditionals, graphing, and trendlines using Excel

    • ENGR 1410 - Programming and Problem Solving in Matlab (3 credits; 2, 2):  Pre-req:  ENGR 1020; Co-req: MTHS 1060/1070 or higher.  
      • Students spend 4 hours per week in class
      • Students formulate solutions to problems and solve using MATLAB. Topics include: 
        • Estimate answers for comparison to computed solutions
        • Developing algorithms
        • Reading, interpreting, and writng programs
        • Writing user instructions
        • Formatting output and plotting
        • Iteration
        • Evaluating conditional statements, 
        • Debugging
        • Analyze data collected using laptop-based instrumentation
      • Students complete 1 – 3 projects to combine all skills learned in the ENGR sequence
      • This course is designed specifically for students planning to major in any engineering field except Chemical Engineering
     
    • ENGR 2080 - Engineering Graphics and Machine Design (2 credits, 1, 2):  Previously called EG 208.  
      • Students spend 3 hours per week in class
      • Students are introduced to engineering graphics principles using SolidWorks. Topics include:
        • Sketching
        • 3-D part and assembly creation
        • Motion studies
        • Finite Element Analysis
        • Exporting files to Rapid Prototyping processes
        • Documented drawings
      • Principles are used to visualize, communicate, and perform graphical analysis of design and engineering problems
      • This course is specifically designed for BioE, IE, ME, and MSE students

     

    • ENGR 2100 - Computer-Aided Design and Engineering Applications (2 credits, 1, 2):  Previously called EG 210.  
      • Students spend 3 hours per week in class
      • Students are introduced to engineering graphics principles for civil engineers. 
      • Sketching and CAD tools are used to visualize, communicate, and perform graphical analysis of civil engineering problems.  
      • This course is specifically designed for BE, CE and EnvE students; uses AUTOCAD.  

     

    • ENGR 1900/2900 Creative Inquiry (1 credit typically)
      • Several General Engineering faculty members also lead hands-on research projects through the campus-wide Creative Inquiry Program. 

    What is the teaching philosophy of General Engineering?

    General Engineering at Clemson utilizes a model called “SCALE-UP”, first developed at NC State by Robert Beichner as a way to teach Physics.  SCALE-UP stands for Student-Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs.  According to Beichner, “…The SCALE-UP Project has established a highly collaborative, hands-on, computer-rich, interactive learning environment for large-enrollment courses. Class time is spent primarily on hands-on activities, simulations, and interesting questions as well as hypothesis-driven labs. Students sit in groups at round tables. Instructors circulate and work with teams and individuals, engaging them in Socratic-like dialogues. Rigorous evaluations of learning have been conducted in parallel with the curriculum development effort. Our findings can be summarized as follows: Ability to solve problems is improved, conceptual understanding is increased, attitudes are improved, failure rates are drastically reduced (especially for women and minorities), and performance in follow up physics and engineering classes is positively impacted…”