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Specialized Honor College Seminars — Spring 2018

The following table lists Honors seminars scheduled to be taught in Fall 2017 semester.

Opposing Views: Writing to Foster Civil Discourse

Opposing Views: Writing to Foster Civil Discourse (3 Credits) HON 2020 | Section  1 | CRN 18418 | MW 12:30-1:15 pm |

Professors Andrew Pyle & Darren Linvill. This class will build an understanding of the importance of civil discourse in our lives and in society and how it can best be defined and practiced. We will accomplish this through the practice of op-ed writing, with the goal of publication in local, regional, or national media outlets. SATISFIES A SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT.

Social Science

HON 2020

1

Religion, Cults, and Secret Societies 

Religion, Cults and Secret Societies (3 Credits) HON 2030 | Section 1 | CRN 10623 | TR 9:30-10:45 am |

Professor Peter Cohen. ‘Cults’, ‘Secret Societies’, and ‘Conspiracy Theories’ have been mentioned and blamed by the media and masses for countless unspeakable actions (especially dues to their relationship with religious communities). We will try to sift through the many accusations made about them, be they on the web or elsewhere, and try see if any definitive truth can be found to substantiate these wild, strange and often even terrifying groups. So, if you’ve ever wondered about the efficacy of the moon landing (and other NASA missions); the Knights Templar (and their treasure); The New World Order; the truth behind the assassinations of John and Bobby Kennedy, Malcolm X or Martin Luther King, Jr.; the deaths of Marilyn Monroe, The Black Dahlia, Harry Houdini (and others); or even what happened at Roswell, New Mexico, this course is for you. SATISFIES A NON-LITERATURE REQUIRMENT.

Non-Literature

HON 2030

1

Special Topics: Entrepreneuership 

Special Topics: Entrepreneurship (1 Credits) HON 2050 | Section 2 | CRN 19908 | T 6:00-6:50 pm |

Professor John Hannon. This course introduces you to the thought processes and entrepreneurial methods by which big problems can be solved through new products or services. We will focus on successful organizations that use entrepreneurial principles for social good (TOMS Shoes, Warby Parker, GoldieBox, Charity Water, etc). You will learn basic techniques in problem identification and problem solving and apply these principles to a prescriptive solution for critical, unmet needs. We will interact with successful alumni entrepreneurs and thought leaders across the country and world as in-person or virtual guest speakers. SATISFIES AN HONORS "OTHER" REQUIRMENT.

Honors Other

HON 2050

2

Intro to Nanotechnology 

Intro to Nanotechnology (3 Credits) HON 2060 | Section 1 | CRN 10624 | TR 9:30-10:45 am |

Professors Thompson Mefford & Chris Kitchens. Nanotechnology represents one of the fastest growing fields in science and technology. Applications of nanotechnology range widely from advanced electronics to energy storage and conversion to biomedical uses including drug delivery and imaging. In this course we will explore the history of the field, the tools used to characterize these unique materials, and discuss the implications for future development on science and society. Focus will be given to the production of these materials, including in-class hands-on synthesis of gold nanoparticles and characterization by electron microscopy and other methods. Specific attention will be given to the environmental and ethical considerations for nanomaterials in consumer products.   SATISFIES A SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY REQUIREMENT.

Science and Technology in Society

HON 2060

1

The Lure and Fear of Biotechnology

The Lure and Fear of Biotechnology (3 Credits) HON 2060| Section 2 | CRN 13435 | MW 2:30-3:45 pm |

Professor Kelly Smith. Advances in biotechnology will soon transform our relationship to the natural world and even what it means to be "human." This class will explore the social and ethical dimensions of many of these technologies through intense Socratic discussion. SATISFIES A SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY REQUIREMENT.

Science and Technology in Society

HON 2060

2

Food Systems in World Historical Perspective 

Food Systems in World Historical Perspective (3 Credits) HON 2060| Section 3 | CRN 16158 | MWF 11:15-12:05 pm |

Professors Pam Mack & Dil Thavarajah.  How will the world feed 10 billion people, even with population growth slowing? This is a challenge not just to agriculture but to our entire food system, from harvesting to transportation to consumption patterns.  This course starts from the history of agriculture and food systems to provide context for an understanding of the coming world food crisis. Topics include: the historical impact of imperialism on world agriculture, the rise of industrial agriculture in the United States, the contributions and biases of agricultural science, primary and alternative food systems, and how food systems are link to health. SATISFIES A SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SOCIETY REQUIREMENT.

Science and Technology in Society

HON 2060

3

Einstein for Everyone

Einstein for Everyone (3 Credits) HON 2070 | Section 1 | CRN 14422 |TR 12:30-1:15 pm |

Professor Mark Leising. We will explore the life, times, and science of Albert Einstein, including the cultural context in which he lived, the progress of his science, and his impact on broader society. No formal background in science is required. Students will learn the ideas of his novel theories, and the meanings of the most famous equation. SATISFIES AN HONORS "OTHER" REQUIRMENT.

Honors Other

HON 2070

1

Infinity: A Big Idea 

Infinity: A Big Idea (3 Credit) | HON 2070 Section 2 | CRN 19992 | MWF 12:20-1:10 pm |

Professor Neil Calkin. The concept of infinity has perplexed and bemused people for thousands of years. Hidden behind the lemniscate symbol are many different types of infinity: cardinals, ordinals and limits, to name a few. We will explore the infinite, and the infinitesimal, in their many incarnations. SATISFIES AN HONORS "OTHER" REQUIREMENT.

Honors Other

HON 2070

2

Diplomacy in Crisis

Diplomacy in Crisis (3 Credit) HON 2090 | Section 2 | CRN 14103 | TR 3:00-4:45 pm |

Professor Vladmir Matic. The number of the hot spots threatening the America’s security and global position has increased in the past few years. Though America is in possession of unparalleled military and economic power it cannot solve these problems alone. It needs alliances and cooperation of other powers. Diplomacy is crucial for the security of the United States and it seems to be in crisis and not sufficiently effective. Can the United States handle these historic changes and challenges? In the past few years diplomacy didn’t work in Ukraine crisis, in Syria, and Yemen, in Korean crisis. How are the current developments affecting America’s global position? If diplomacy doesn’t work shall we be tempted to resort to use of military power or withdraw to isolation?  Let us try to find the answers. A combination of lectures and seminar format will ensure active participation of students and will help hone your research, writing and presentation skills along with critical analysis, creative thinking, and tolerance for different approaches and views. SATISFIES A CROSS CULTURAL AWARENESS REQUIREMENT. 

Cross-Cultural Awareness

HON 2090

2

French Conversation 

French Conversation (1 Credit) HON 2090 | Section 3 | CRN 14787 | M 10:10-11:00 am |

Professor Kenneth Widgren. The French section of Modern Languages and the Honors Department are pleased to announce HON2090, a one-hour course open exclusively to Honors students in FREN 2010 and above. This course will take the place of an honors contract you would otherwise have in your French class. Together we will explore and discuss a wide range of subjects concerning French culture, history, art and literature as a way to enrich your understanding of France and the Francophone world. Class will consist primarily of group discussion (mainly in French, but in English when appropriate), allowing you to practice speaking beyond the normal classroom setting and thus developing your linguistic competencies even further. Short supplemental readings will also help you to improve your vocabulary and reading skills. SATISFIES A CROSS CULTURAL AWARENESS REQUIREMENT.

Cross-Cultural Awareness

HON 2090

3

Experiencing the Arts

Experiencing the Arts (3 Credits) | HON 2100 | Section 1 | CRN 15991 | MW 11:15-12:05 pm |

Professor Mark Spede. What is Art? What is Beauty? What makes great art or music move us? Focusing on music, but incorporating the visual, dramatic, and design arts, the class will react to the arts through the lens of aesthetics. A major component of the course will be developing critical thinking skills, attending artistic events and reacting to them. The course fulfills a non-literature humanities requirement. Lab floats depending on shows in the Brooks Center. SATISFIES A NON-LITERATURE REQUIREMENT.

Non-Literature

HON 2100

1

Literature and/ as Resistance 

Literature and/ as Resistance (3 Credits) | HON 2210 | Section 1 | CRN 10631 | TR 2:00-3:15 pm |

Professor Gabriela Stoicea. In this seminar, we will look at literary expressions of resistance in societies or groups that experienced oppression deriving from their cultural, religious, gender, ethnic, political, or national affiliations. Questions we will ask include: What is the connection between creative writing and social resistance? Can creative forms of expression be more effective than straightforward political rhetoric? Can literature change the world? SATISFIES A LITERATURE REQUIREMENT.   

Literature

HON 2210

1

Building Imaginary Worlds 

Building Imaginary Worlds (3 Credit) HON 2210 | Section 2 | CRN 12632 | R 5:00-7:45 pm |

Professor April Pelt. Worldbuilding—the act of creating and populating a complex, fully realized fictional world—is at the heart of science fiction and fantasy. In this course, we will map the physical, political, historical, and socioeconomic landscapes of multiple imaginary worlds. In so doing, we will not only examine how authors construct their fictional worlds, but we will also explore how and why these imaginary worlds both emulate and deviate from the world we inhabit. In addition to completing several short essays on assigned topics, students will complete a semester-long project in which in they build an imaginary world of their own. SATISFIES A LITERATURE REQUIREMENT.

Literature

HON 2210

2

Shipwrecks, Outlaws, and Wonderlands: The Adventure Novel, 19th-21st Centuries

Shipwrecks, Outlaws, and Wonderlands: The Adventure Novel, 19th-21st Centuries (3 Credit) HON 2210 | Section 3 | CRN 13637 | TR 2:00-3:15 pm |

Professor Pauline De Tholozany. In this course, we will seek to define and analyze a genre that has received less critical attention than others, but whose popularity in the nineteenth-century helped shape major national myths. The adventure novel offered both an escape from the everyday and a reflection on the subject and their surroundings: if adventure is, etymologically speaking, “what must happen,” then how do adventure novels question the possibility of individuality? How is the rise of the adventure novel in the 19th century linked to the emergence of the nation-state? And how do 20th- and 21st-century renderings of adventure question or subvert this link? The class will be divided into three parts, the first of which will be dedicated to Robinson Crusoe and his avatars in 20th-century French literature (Tournier, Friday). We will then dive into 19th-century French fictions in which solitary heroes break free from prison and escape the law, thus questioning both the legal system and political regimes of their periods (Dumas' The Count of Monte-Christo and Hugo's Les Misérables). We will finally discuss how the fantastic affects adventures and heroes in novels from the 19th to the 21st century (Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and Mohsin Hamid's Exit West). This seminar will be based on in-class discussions on the assigned literary and critical texts. There will be group presentations on additional visual materials – such as for instance the illustrations of Tenniel (Alice in Wonderland), or the many 19th-century illustrations of Dumas and Hugo's novels. Written assignments for this class will consist in a short midterm paper (3-4 pages) and a longer (7-8 pages) final paper. Other written assignments will include short response papers on the assigned readings. SATISFIES A LITERATURE REQUIREMENT.

Literature

HON 2210

3

Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Literature and Culture

Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Literature and Culture (3 Credits) HON 2210 | Section 4 | CRN 18494 | MW 2:30-3:45 pm |

Professor Gabriel Hankins. Comparative course in the culture of fascism and anti-fascism between the world wars. We will read perspectives on fascism from political science, history, architecture, film studies, and literary studies, in conjunction with careful readings of literature and film from the period. SATISFIES A LITERATURE REQUIREMENT.

Literature

HON 2210

4

American Science Fiction: (Other) World Literature 

American Science Fiction: (Other) World Literature (3 Credits) HON 2210 | Section 5 | CRN 14102 | MW 3:35-4:50 pm |

Professor Andrew Lemons. A survey of works of American Science Fiction from 1950-present that focus on the idea of imagining other worlds as a tool for exploring cultural, biological, political and social change. SATISFIES A LITERATURE REQUIREMENT.

Literature

HON 2210

5