Rutland Institute for Ethics

2014-2015 Presidential Colloquium

Remembering, Reckoning and Responsibility

The theme of this year’s Presidential Colloquium, “Remembering, Reckoning and Responsibility,” was chosen with an eye to alignment with the summer reading program for incoming freshmen as well as links to a series on “Race and the University,” sponsored by the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities.

The Colloquium will explore the significance of where we have been in knowing who we are now. This is an important question on the societal, organizational, and individual level. It invites attention to cognitive and social biases that are, more often than not, unnoticed and unacknowledged, but strongly influence judgments and decisions about individual action as well as public policy. And, most important, what’s at stake here is, in a word, “character,” the character of an organization or an individual, for example.

The aim of the Presidential Colloquium is to provide opportunities for Clemson University students and faculty, as well as members of the community to come together to explore important issues. The colloquium comprises various events spread over the academic year, e.g., speakers, theatrical performances, panel discussions, and films. In every case the event is linked to the colloquium theme, which is selected with an eye to its integration “across the curriculum.

Tuesday
March 31, 2015
6:30 PM

Lee Hall Auditorium

Dr. Eric Foner

DeWitt Clinton Professor of History, Columbia University

Dr. Eric Foner
Eric Foner

"Abraham Lincoln, Emancipation, and the Origins of Reconstruction"

Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University, is one of this country's most prominent historians. He received his doctoral degree at Columbia under the supervision of Richard Hofstadter. He is one of only two persons to serve as president of the three major professional organizations: the Organization of American Historians, American Historical Association, and Society of American Historians, and one of a handful to have won the Bancroft and Pulitzer Prizes in the same year.

Professor Foner's publications have concentrated on the intersections of intellectual, political and social history, and the history of American race relations. His best-known books are: Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War (1970; reissued with new preface 1995) Tom Paine and Revolutionary America (1976); Nothing But Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy (1983); Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877 (1988) (winner, among other awards, of the Bancroft Prize, Parkman Prize, and Los Angeles Times Book Award and soon to be reissued with a new preface); The Reader's Companion to American History (with John A. Garraty, 1991); The Story of American Freedom (1998); and Who Owns History? Rethinking the Past in a Changing World (2002). His survey textbook of American history, Give Me Liberty! An American History and a companion volume of documents, Voices of Freedom, appeared in 2004. The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery (winner, among other awards, of the Bancroft Prize, Pulitzer Prize for History, and The Lincoln Prize) was published in the fall of 2010. His latest book, Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad, was published early in 2015. His books have been translated into Chinese, Korean, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, and Spanish.


Eric Foner has also been the co-curator, with Olivia Mahoney, of two prize-winning exhibitions on American history: A House Divided: America in the Age of Lincoln, which opened at the Chicago Historical Society in 1990, and America's Reconstruction: People and Politics After the Civil War, which opened at the Virginia Historical Society in 1995 and traveled to several other locations. He revised the presentation of American history at the Hall of Presidents at Disney World, and Meet Mr. Lincoln at Disneyland, and has served as consultant to several National Parks Service historical sites and historical museums. Read more about Dr. Foner on his website.



The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Pan African Studies Program
Calhoun Honors College

 

Monday
April 6, 2015
6:30 PM

Academic Success
Center 118

Dr. Michael Meng

Professor of History, Clemson University

Dr. Michael Meng
Michael Meng

"Why do We Study History?"

History can sometimes be viewed as a practice of recalling past stories out of curiosity about how others lived before us. But there is another way of viewing the narratives that historians reconstruct about the past.

This lecture discusses the moral dimensions of writing history. It views history as an important component of a thoughtful and examined life.

Michael Meng teaches modern German and East European history at Clemson. His research has dealt with the ways in which Germans, Poles, and Jews have dealt with the legacies of the Holocaust. His book on these issues, Shattered Spaces: Encountering Jewish Ruins in Postwar Germany and Poland, appeared in 2011 with Harvard University Press.



The Rutland Institute for Ethics
College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities

 

Student Commentators  
Kacie Harris Kacie Harris graduated with a bachelor’s degree in history in 2014 from Limestone College. Her focus in the master’s program here at Clemson is modern German history, particularly American POW experience in WWI Germany. After completing her master’s degree at Clemson, she plans to further her studies in a Ph.D. program.
Sandra Mokalled Sandra Mokalled is a first year graduate student in the Department of History. She graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor’s of Arts from Clemson University in 2014. Her general research interests are gender studies in the Middle East, and her master’s thesis focuses on the rise of Arab feminism in 20th century Egypt and the ways in which the lives of leading feminists were impacted by their role as pioneers for social change. 
   

Wednesday
March 11, 2015
5:00PM

Lee Hall Auditorium

Dr. Sheryll D. Cashin

Professor of Law, Georgetown University

Dr. Sheryll Cashin
Sheryll Cashin

"Place, not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America"

"Race-based affirmative action had been declining as a factor in university admissions even before the recent spate of related cases arrived at the Supreme Court. Since Ward Connerly kickstarted a state-by-state political mobilization against affirmative action in the mid-1990s, the percentage of four-year public colleges that consider racial or ethnic status in admissions has fallen from 60 percent to 35 percent. Only 45 percent of private colleges still explicitly consider race, with elite schools more likely to do so, although they too have retreated. 

For law professor and civil rights activist Sheryll Cashin, this isn’t entirely bad news, because as she argues, affirmative action as currently practiced does little to help disadvantaged people. The truly disadvantaged—black and brown children trapped in high-poverty environs—are not getting the quality schooling they need in part because backlash and wedge politics undermine any possibility for common-sense public policies. Using place instead of race in diversity programming, she writes, will better amend the structural disadvantages endured by many children of color, while enhancing the possibility that we might one day move past the racial resentment that affirmative action engenders... " ~ Beacon Press

Sheryll Cashin, Professor of Law at Georgetown, writes about race relations and inequality in America and is a passionate advocate and sought after speaker.

Dr. Cashin teaches Administrative Law, Constitutional Law, and Race and American Law among other subjects. She writes about race relations, government and inequality in America. Her new book, Place Not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America (forthcoming Beacon Press, 2014), argues that affirmative action as currently practiced does little to help disadvantaged people and offers a new framework for true inclusion. Her book, The Failures of Integration(PublicAffairs, 2004) was an Editors' Choice in the New York Times Book Review. Cashin is also a two-time nominee for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for non-fiction (2005 and 2009). She has published widely in academic journals and written commentaries for several periodicals, including the L.A. Times, Washington Post, and Education Week. (more from the Georgetown University website)

Please follow her on Twitter and Facebook and join the conversation about how to contribute to inclusive multiracial politics in America!



The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Chief Diversity Office

 

 

Wednesday
February 4, 2015
5:00PM

Tillman Auditotium

Monica Williams-Hudgens

Granddaughter of the late Strom Thurmond

Monica Williams Hudgens
Monica Williams-Hudgens

"Reckoning the Strom Thurmond Lineage with My Family's Legacy"

Monica Williams-Hudgens is a domestic violence advocate, activist, writer, teacher, community organizer, and scholar.  She earned her AA in Early Childhood Devolvement, Bachelors of Science in Human Services (Summa Cum Laude) and is currently working on her Master’s of Science degree in Organizational Leadership.  Monica has dedicated her life to social justice. She has worked at the grassroots level within and sometimes out of the traditional system to create change.

Monica has studied various contexts in which people who are seeking real change can find transformation. She has worked tirelessly towards building a community of women and children with strong voices for sustainable and effective change.  Being an agent for social justice and change is just one of the many rich family legacies Monica’s father Julius Thomas Williams and mother Essie Mae Washington-Williams left for their children, grandchildren, great-grand-children and their future generations to continue.

Monica Williams married a Marine Corporal, Gerald J. Hudgens thirty-seven years ago.  They have three wonderful daughters, three beautiful granddaughters and two energetic grandsons.



The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Strom Thurmond Institute
President's Commission on Black Faculty and Staff
College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities

 



Tuesday
October 7, 2014
5:30PM

Academic Success Center 118

Dr. Todd May

Professor of Philosophy, Clemson University

Dr. Todd May
Todd May

"What Makes Life Meaningful?"

People often think that unless our lives are given meaning by God or some larger cosmic order, then they are meaningless. However, there is at least one way to think about what makes a human life meaningful that doesn't rely on a meaning that is already out there. This paper sketches a new way to think about the meaningfulness of a life.

Todd May is Class of 1941 Memorial Professor of the Humanities. He is the author of 13 books, including the forthcoming A Significant Life: Human Meaning in a Silent Universe (University of Chicago Press). More about Professor May and his books.



The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Philosophy and Religion
College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities

 

 

Student Commentators

Emily Miller
Emily Miller
Emily Miller is a senior majoring in philosophy with an emphasis in law, liberty, and justice and minoring in Spanish. She is involved in Chi Omega sorority, Order of Omega Honor Society, Omicron Delta Kappa Honor Society, Mortar Board Honor Society, Blue Key Honor Society , and is an ambassador for Global L.E.A.D. study abroad . She is currently in the process of applying to law school to pursue a career in the legal profession.
Chameo Frierson
Chameo Frierson
Chameo Frierson is a junior majoring in philosophy. He is also an Army ROTC Cadet. He aspires to be an officer in the United States Army or work in federal law enforcement.
Ethan Moore
Ethan Moore
Ethan Moore is a senior majoring in English and minoring in Philosophy He is Vice President of the English Majors Organization and a Clemson Writing Fellow. After graduation he intends to enter into full-time Christian vocational ministry, which will mean attending seminary just as soon as he has enough money to do so.
Eric Horton
Eric Horton
Eric Horton a senior majoring in philosophy. After graduation, Horton, from Cincinnati, Ohio plans to take few years off of school to work and travel before returning to study philosophy in graduate school.

 

 

 














Links






Contact Us




Rutland Institute for Ethics © 2015