Rutland Institute for Ethics

2016 Presidential Colloquium

Rigor, Rights and Responsibility in Research

The theme of this year’s Presidential Colloquium was chosen with an eye to making the most of connections to the summer reading incoming students did this year (We are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler), research already underway, as well new research projects regarding the history of Clemson University, and Clemson’s 2020Forward goal of increasing research and creating an “exemplary research environment.”

The events of the Colloquium will explore the expectations of the research enterprise —including limits or constraints on it, some of which arise from expectations of rigor, while others are associated with the rights of research subjects, for example— and invite us to consider the implications of the widespread belief that research will solve problems, provide clarity, and generally make things better.

The aim of the Presidential Colloquium is to provide opportunities for Clemson University students and faculty, as well as members of the community to come together to explore important issues. The colloquium comprises various events spread over the academic year, e.g., speakers, theatrical performances, panel discussions, and films. In every case the event is linked to the colloquium theme, which is selected with an eye to its integration “across the curriculum.

Tuesday
February 23, 2016
5:00 PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Allyson Bennett

Department of Psychology; University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://psych.wisc.edu/faculty-bennett.htm

Dr. Allyson Bennett
Allyson Bennett

"Science, society, and animal research:  Ethical dilemmas of yesterday, today, and the future"

My research centers on how the interplay between early environments, experiences, and genes contribute to individual variation in psychological and physical health across the lifespan. A longitudinal and multidisciplinary research approach with nonhuman primates provides a controlled experimental avenue for better understanding the long-term consequences of early experiences and environments, as well as areas of plasticity and potential for recovery. A central question in my work is how aspects of physical and social environments affect biobehavioral development. Thus, part of my research takes a comparative approach to evaluate specific features of the environments and experiences of laboratory animals. In turn, the work provides empirical evidence to inform evolving standards for animal welfare, particularly those that also affect scientific outcomes. The quality and progress of both science and animal welfare depend on policies and practices that are evidence-based. My expertise in psychological science, coupled with a commitment to science education allow me to contribute to public dialogue and collaboration with diverse stakeholders in evolving standards for humane and responsible research to promote health for people and nonhuman animals.



The Rutland Institute for Ethics

 

Thursday
March 3, 2016
4:30PM

TBD

Dr. Dan Wikler

Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Ethics and Population Health, Harvard University

Dr. Dan Wikler
Dan Wikler

TBD

Daniel Wikler’s current research interests are ethical issues in population and international health, including the allocation of health resources, health research involving human subjects, and ethical dilemmas arising in public health practice. He served as the first Staff Ethicist for the World Health Organization, and remains a consultant to several WHO programs. Prof. Wikler was co-founder and second president of the International Association of Bioethics and has served on the advisory boards of the Asian Bioethics Association and the Pan American Health Organization Regional Program in Bioethics.

Professor Wikler is presently co-director of the Program on Ethical Issues in International Health Research at the School of Public Health. In addition to a program of both empirical and theoretical research on ethical issues in health research, particularly in developing countries, the Program offers fellowships for scholars in developing countries and sponsors an intensive each year for an international clientele. Versions of the course have been taught in ten developing countries. Prof. Wikler currently is co-director of a collaborative project with the PRC Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization to join Chinese colleagues, including former Program fellows, in an effort to enhance the China’s capacity for ethical review of health research. A frequent lecturer on ethics and health in the PRC and Hong Kong, Prof. Wikler holds honorary appointments at two Beijing research institutions.

Professor Wikler’s published work addresses many issues in bioethics, including issues in reproduction, transplantation, and end-of-life decision-making in addition to population and international health.. His book series, Studies in Philosophy and Health Policy, was published by Cambridge University Press, as was From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice, co-authored by Prof. Wikler and three other philosophers. While at the World Health Organization, he instituted an international collaboration among philosophers and economists on ethical, methodological, and philosophical issues raised by WHO’s work in measurement of the global burden of disease and in developing methods for improving health resource allocation.

He is a core faculty member in the new Harvard Program in Ethics and Health and participates in faculty research and curriculum development groups on such issues as disparities in health status and the impact of corruption and fraud on public health. Professor Wikler also serves on the faculty of the Harvard Ph.D. Program in Health Policy and as a faculty associate in Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics.


The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Philosophy and Religion

Tuesday
March 22, 2016
5:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Lisa Lee

Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues; Washington, DC
http://bioethics.gov/lisa-lee

Dr. Lisa Lee
Lisa Lee

"The Ethics of Excellence in Research"

Lisa M. Lee, PhD, MA, MS is the Executive Director of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues.  Lee, who has a PhD from Johns Hopkins, an MA in educational psychology from the University of Colorado, and an MS in bioethics from Alden March Bioethics Institute at Albany Medical College, is an epidemiologist and public health ethicist.

The focus of Lee’s current work is bioethics pedagogy and public health ethics.  Her prior work at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention included the ethics of public health surveillance, privacy and public health data use, and infectious disease epidemiology. During her 14 year career at CDC, she held several leadership positions, including the agency’s Assistant Science Officer and Director of the Office of Scientific Integrity. 

Lee is the lead editor of Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance, 3d edition (Oxford University Press, 2010).  She has authored numerous publications in both science and ethics and serves as associate editor for the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry and Public Health Reviews. Dr Lee serves on the Executive Board of Association for Practical and Professional Ethics and is an Adjunct Professor at the Center for Biomedical Ethics Education & Research at Albany Medical College, where she teaches ethics. She is the recipient of the 2014 Pellegrino Medal for excellence in bioethics.


The Rutland Institute for Ethics

 

 

Tuesday
April 5, 2016
5:00PM
Hardin 100

Dr. Cindy Pury

Department of Psychology; Clemson University

Dr. Cinthia Pury
Cindy Pury

"Doing the Best That You Can With What You Have: Limited Resources and Research Ethics"

Cindy Pury is a Professor of Psychology at Clemson, where she is the administrator for the Human Participants Research Pool. Her research focuses primarily on courage and situational affordances, and has been published in numerous scholarly journals. She is also an Associate Editor for the Journal of Positive Psychology and she co-edited The Psychology of Courage: Modern Research on an Ancient Virtue (American Psychological Association Books) with Shane Lopez. 



The Rutland Institute for Ethics

 

 

Alice Brawley

Department of Psychology; Clemson University

Alice Brawely
Alice Brawley

Alice Brawley is a Ph.D. candidate in industrial-organizational psychology. She received her M.S. in Applied Psychology at Clemson in 2014. Her research focuses on unusual work experiences and worker populations as well as quantitative methods in organizational psychology. Alice has special interests in the ethical treatment and study of workers in novel and understudied populations, such as individuals working on crowdsourcing platforms. She recently published research that examined factors affecting crowdsourced workers’ job satisfaction and turnover and best and worst practices for the managers in these settings. In her methodological research, she evaluates the empirical performance of statistical tests and psychometric properties of psychological measures to ensure that both are used to make correct inferences in research. Her work has been published in various outlets and presented at conferences of the Society of Industrial-Organizational Psychology, Society of Occupational Health Psychology, Psychometric Society, and Southeastern Psychological Association. Alice has taught a number of courses in research methods and statistics, and she was the recipient of the Graduate Teaching Assistant Excellence Award for Clemson’s College of Business and Behavioral Science in 2015.



The Rutland Institute for Ethics

 



Thursday
April 14, 2016
5:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Tony Milligan

Department of Theology; King's College, London

Dr. Tony Milligan
Tony Milligan

"Truthfulness and Partisanship in Research"

Dr Tony Milligan is the author of Beyond Animal Rights (2010); Love (2011); Civil Disobedience: Protest, Justification and the Law (2013); Nobody Owns the Moon (2014); and Animal Ethics: The Basics (2015); as well as the co-author of edited volumes on Love and its Objects (2014) and on The Ethics of Space Exploration (forthcoming 2016). He has lectured with various philosophy departments in the UK and is currently a Teaching Fellow in Ethics and the Philosophy of Religion with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at King's College London. His forthcoming book, due out in the summer of 2016, is The Next Democracy? an exploration of the possibilities and limits of direct democratic systems.

The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Philosophy and Religion

 






Links






Contact Us




Rutland Institute for Ethics © 2016