Adding Value: Exploring the Means and the End

The aim of the Presidential Colloquium is to provide opportunities for Clemson University students and faculty, as well as members of the community to come together to explore important issues. The colloquium comprises various events spread over the academic year, e.g., speakers, theatrical performances, panel discussions, and films. In every case the event is linked to the colloquium theme, which is selected with an eye to its integration “across the curriculum."

The theme of this year’s Presidential Colloquium, “Adding Value: Exploring the Means and the End,” was chosen with an eye to complementarity during the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of integration at Clemson. The theme is intentionally broad so that it can encompass discussion of the ways in which inclusion or diversity enriches an organization along with other ways of adding value, e.g., values-based leadership, innovation, promoting the arts, or encouraging entrepreneurial thinking and activity. In some cases, adding value is a project undertaken quite deliberately; in others it is an unintended but most welcome result. The colloquium will explore the end and the means of adding value across the disciplines of the five colleges and the graduate school, our research activities, athletics, and student life, as well as off campus in the communities Clemson University serves, such as business, the professions, government, and K-12 education. For More Information, click here.

Thursday
April 11, 2013
7:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute
Dr. John C. Knapp
Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership
Samford University

John C. Knapp

John C. Knapp

"Why Democracies Fail: Leadership and The Struggle for The Common Good."

The second decade of the 21st century may be remembered best as an era of global movements for democratic reform.  As experiments with democracy struggle to get established in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and elsewhere, history reminds us that their odds of long-term survival are slim.  How do leaders' values and priorities make the difference?  Is majority rule a sufficient foundation for a good society?  What are the ethical underpinnings of sustainable democratic institutions?  What role, if any, should higher education play?

John C. Knapp is the founding director of the Frances Marlin Mann Center for Ethics and Leadership at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala.,  where he concurrently serves as University Professor and Mann Family Professor of Ethics and Leadership.  Located in the Office of the Provost, the university-wide center promotes student development through academic and co-curricular programming, and supports teaching and scholarship in the schools of the arts, arts and sciences, business, divinity, education, law, nursing and pharmacy.  It also serves as a valued resource to the professional community.  Before joining Samford in 2008, Dr. Knapp was professor and director of the Center for Ethics and Corporate Responsibility at Georgia State University’s J. Mack Robinson College of Business.  Internationally known as a speaker and seminar leader for professional organizations, he contributes to public understanding of ethics through frequent interviews with such media as “The New York Times,” “BusinessWeek,” “Sports Illustrated,” “Entrepreneur,” National Public Radio, “Financial Week” and Bloomberg News Service.

In 2003 he was appointed by the Governor of Georgia to develop principles of ethical governance and lead training sessions for gubernatorial appointees, including the boards and senior officers of more than 50 state agencies.  He frequently speaks to public and university audiences about the moral purposes of higher education, and recently has been invited to speak in Egypt, England, Lebanon, North Korea, South Africa and Switzerland.  He is author or editor of books including For the Common Good: The Ethics of Leaderhship in the 21st Century; Leaders on Ethics: Real-World Perspectives on Today’s Business Challenges; The Business of Higher Education (three volumes); and How The Church Fails Businesspeople (and What Can Be Done about It).  Dr. Knapp earned the Ph.D. at the University of Wales (U.K.), the master of arts at Columbia Theological Seminary, and the bachelor of science at Georgia State University.

 

 

Sponsored By:
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Thomas F. Chapman Leadership Scholars Program

 

Thursday
March 7, 2013
7:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute
Professor R. Craig Wood
Center for Education Finance
University of Florida

R. Craig Wood

R. Craig Wood

"Financing Education: Economic Development and the Ethical Imperative"

R. Craig Wood is one of the leading scholars in the field of financing public education. He is currently a Research Foundation Professor and also serves as the Executive Director of the American Education Finance
Association. Specifi cally, his research and work regarding the constitutional challenges of state methods of distributing school fi nance aid has appeared in a number of scholarly journals, chapters, and texts. He is one
of the most prolifi c authors in America regarding constitutional challenges to state aid plans. His publications record includes more than 250 book chapters, monographs, and scholarly journal articles including the
American Education Finance Association’s Annual Yearbooks, Journal of Education Finance, Education Law Association’s Handbook of School Law series. His books include Education Finance Law, Fiscal Leadership for Schools, Principles of School Business Management, and Money and Schools. His latest text, Financing Public and Private Education is forthcoming. He serves on the editorial boards of West’s Education Law Reporter, Journal of Education Finance, and Educational Considerations and the University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy. Additionally, he is the executive editor of the Florida Journal of Educational Administration & Policy.

He has presented his research regarding education fi nance constitutional challenges including numerous general sessions, to such organizations of Education Law Association, American Education Finance Association, American Educational Research Association, and other national organizations. He has conducted education finance litigation workshops for the National Conference on State Legislatures and the National Association of Attorneys General. His education fi nance litigation activities include serving as lead expert for states of South Dakota, Montana, Missouri, and Florida. He has consulted with many state legislatures. He has designed the education finance distribution formula for the state of Missouri, which has withstood constitutional challenge. He is a past President of the American Education Finance Association.

 

 

Sponsored By:
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
UCEA Center for Leadership in Law and Education

 

 

Friday
February 22, 2013
2:30PM-3:30PM

Hardin Hall 100


Professor Jules Lobel
Bessie McKee Wathour Endowed Chair
University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Jules Lobel

Jules Lobel
"Solitary Confinement in American Prisons: Legal and Moral Dilemmas"

Professor Lobel's talk will explore the use of solitary confinement in American prisons including California, trace the history of its use, and raise questions of how we define "cruel and unusual" punishment prohibited by the Constitution. Is solitary confinement cruel for constitutional and moral purposes only if it can be shown that the prisoner is seriously mentally ill, as one prominent judge found? What makes a practice cruel - should it require a showing of mental harm, or proof of the intent of the jailor? What are "unusual" practices - are practices that we might recognize as cruel but are nontheless widespread, be held unconstitutional? Should our society accept prolonged solitary confinement as a means to make prisons less violent?

About the Speaker:
Professor Jules Lobel is the Bessie McKee Wathour Endowed Chair at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and the President of the Center for Constitutional Rights, a human and constitutional rights organization based in New York. He has written about and litigated cases involving the use of solitary confinement, including arguing in the United States Supreme Court on behalf of prisoners placed in solitary at the Ohio Supermax prison. He is currently the Center's lead attorney in Ruiz v. Brown, a class action lawsuit of 1000 prisoners in California's Pelican Bay State Penintentiary who are in a draconian form of solitary confinement in small, windowless cells 23 hours a day. About 500 of these prisoners have languished in solitary for over 10 years and almost 100 for more than 20 years.

A facebook page for the event can be found here.

This talk is part of the Department of Philosophy and Religion's "Law, Liberty, and Justice" Lecture Series. More information about the series and other LLJ activities can be found here.

Sponsored By:
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Philosophy & Religion



Wednesday
February 13, 2013
7:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute


Joe Erwin
President
Erwin Penland

Howard Harris

Joe Erwin
“Will Work for Food"

After starting their careers in Greenville, S.C., then enjoying success in New York at DMB&B and Saatchi & Saatchi, respectively, Joe and his wife, Gretchen, bought Greenville’s Penland Advertising and started Erwin Penland with one account and two employees. Their goal: extraordinary work, coupled with extraordinary customer service.

Twenty-five years later that’s still the hallmark of the agency. Only instead of two employees there are now 375 located in Greenville and New York, and the agency’s clients include some of America’s leading brands: Verizon Wireless, Denny’s, Michelin, Lockheed Martin and General Motors among them.

The focus of Erwin Penland is creating interactions that inspire action through seamlessly integrated communication. Joe has spearheaded the agency’s foray into a wide range of marketing disciplines, which now include in-house digital, public relations, experiential branding, digital asset management and analytics capabilities. The results of this steadfast approach have been consistent growth and countless awards for creative and strategic excellence.

Joe also personally oversees Erwin Penland’s pro bono work and diversity initiatives, for which the agency received the Diversity Leadership Award from the Richard W. Riley Institute at Furman University. And he is deeply involved in nurturing the company’s entrepreneurial culture, which has earned Erwin Penland recognition over the past year as one of the “Best Places to Work” by Advertising Age, PR News and the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce.

Active in the community and the industry, Joe has served on the boards of the South Carolina Special Olympics, the Governor’s Commission on Teacher Quality, the Partnership for a Drug-Free America, and the 4A’s Foundation and its Southern Region Board.

Click Here for Pictures from the Event



Sponsored By:
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Philosophy & Religion

The Pearce Center for Professional Communication


 

Wednesday
October 24, 2012
6:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute


Troy Jollimore, Ph.D.
Professor of Philosophy
California State University-Chico

Howard Harris

Troy Jollimore
“Educating the Imagination"

Dr. Troy Jollimore studied in the Philosophy Department at Princeton University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1999. Before studying at Princeton, he was an undergraduate at the University of King’s College and in the Philosophy Department at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. After receiving his Ph.D. he taught at Georgetown University and the University of California, Davis, before coming to California State
University, Chico.

He was named the Outstanding Professor at CSU Chico for 2009-2010, and was a fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center in 2006/07 and at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in 2012. He has authored or co-authored several essays on philosophy and fi lm, which have appeared in books including Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind: Philosophers on Film (Routledge), The Big Lebowski and Philosophy (Wiley-Blackwell), and
Bioethics at the Movies (John Hopkins University Press). His philosophical monographs include On Loyalty (Routledge, 2012), and Love’s Vision (Princeton, 2011). The latter was recently positively reviewed in the
journal Ethics and described as “delightfully written and philosophically ambitious.” He is also a poet, and his most recent collection of poetry is At Lake Scugog (Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets, 2011). His fi rst
collection, Tom Thomson in Purgatory, won the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry in 2006. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, McSweeney’s, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Washington Post, Exile
Quarterly, and elsewhere.



Sponsored By:
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Philosophy & Religion

The Pearce Center for Professional Communication


 

Wednesday
September 19, 2012
6:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute


Kenneth Majer
Consultant, Speaker, and Author of Values-Based Leadership:
A Revolutionary Approach to Business Success and Personal Prosperity

Howard Harris

Kenneth Majer
“The Role of Leadership and Culture When Building a World-Class Organization"

A renowned speaker, Dr. Kenneth Majer has twice addressed White House conferences and is a Resource Speaker for Vistage International, the world’s largest CEO member organization. He has served as advisor to the Leadership Institute for Entrepreneurs at the University of San Diego, and as a professor/administrator at Indiana University and the University of California-San Diego.

Ken has been a successful author, consultant, and speaker for over 30 years. He is an effective strategist with proven ability to mentor/coach executives and managers at all levels. He is a subject matter expert in change management, corporate culture, communications, values-based leadership, organizational alignment, and management training.

A partial list of clients includes Applied Micro Circuits Corporation (AMCC), AT&T, ARC International, Citibank, GTE, Intel, Motorola, NAVTEQ, Nissan, Pacifi c Gas & Electric, Sharp HealthCare, State Farm Insurance, Toyota Financial Services, and the US Government. As a consultant to the US Agency for International Development, Ken designed basic skills education programs in southern Africa as part of America’s human rights interests in the region.



Sponsored By:
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Spiro Institute of Entrepreneurial Leadership

The Richard H. Pennell Center for Real Estate Development