Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
2008-09 Presidential Colloquium...

Principles and Perspectives in Progress

The aim of the Presidential Colloquium, which is moving into its ninth year, is to provide opportunities for Clemson University students and faculty, as well as members of the community to come together to explore important issues.  The colloquium comprises various events spread over the academic year, e.g., speakers, theatrical performances, panel discussions, and films.  In every case the event is linked to the colloquium theme, which is selected with an eye to its integration “across the curriculum."

The basic idea for this year's series comes from One Foot in Eden (the summer reading book), where we see varied and conflicting perspectives and principles at work in the context of what, for some at least, counts as progress.  (A central plot element in the book is the construction of a dam in the Jocassee Gorge.)  

The additional thought is that although both principles and perspectives are associated with stability, they are not in fact static; they evolve  (not always for the best) as people interact, some of them acting with an eye to moving forward, (i.e., to progress), while others are working to maintain (or as they might prefer to say, preserve) the status quo. One might say, then, that there is a sense in which principles and perspectives are themselves (works) in progress. The events of the colloquium will explore or, perhaps instantiate, this set of ideas.

FALL 2008 / SPRING 2009

 

FALL 2008

August 18, 2008-September 26, 2008
Lee Gallery

"Where You're From"

A Lee Gallery/Colloquium Exhibit

 

"Where Your 're From"

“Where You’re From,” an exhibit that expands and compliments One Foot in Eden, includes installations, "reliquary," paintings and sculpture: Monday, August 18 -- Friday, September 26.
http://www.clemson.edu/caah/leegallery/

Where You’re From
The basic values and views of an individual usually spring from their home and that home’s place.  “Where You’re From” looks at home place as a wellspring of principles and perspectives.  The south has a particular understanding of home place as essential to values and view and thus identity.  Southerners when introduced to strangers will almost always ask “Where you from?” the contracted question of polite conversation aimed at getting to know someone.   “Where you’re from.” is also a declaration that acknowledges the influence and preeminence of home place. 

Sponsored By:

The Rutland Institute for Ethics

Lee Gallery

 

September 9, 2008

Tuesday, 4:00PM
McKissick Theater

Dr. Paul Sutter

Associate Professor of History; The University of Georgia

Paul Sutter

Providence Canyon
Photo By Arthur Rothstein

"Let Us Now Praise Famous Gullies: Georgia's 'Little Grand Canyon' and Environmental Progress in the South"

Paul Sutter is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Georgia, wherer he teaches modern U.S. history and environmental history.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in 1997,and he then served as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Technology and the Environment at the University of Virginia from  1997-2000.

Paul has published numerous articles and book chapters on the American wilderness movement, southern environmental history, U.S. imperial environmental history, environmental historiography, and other topics, and the University of Washington Press published his  first book, "Driven Wild: How the Fight Against Automobiles Launched the Modern Wilderness Movement", in 2002.  Paul is also the academic editor of a new book series, “Environmental History and the American South,” published by the University of Georgia Press.

He is the  co-editor of the forthcoming volume, "Environmental History and the American South: A Reader" (UGA Press, 2009), and he is currently working on two book projects.  The first, tentatively titled “Pulling the Teeth of the Tropics: Environment, Disease, Race, and the U.S. Sanitary Program in Panama, 1904-1914,” interprets American expansion and imperial public health through the lens of environmental history.

The second, tentatively titled “Let Us Now Praise Famous Gullies: Georgia’s ‘Little Grand Canyon’ and Conservation in the South,” examines the history of soil erosion and conservation in the U.S. South through the unlikely history of Providence Canyon State Park,  which preserves a network of spectacular erosion gullies.

Sponsored By:

The Rutland Institute for Ethics
Science and Technology in Society Program (STS)

 

September 16, 2008

Tuesday, 3:30PM
Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Michael Shermer

Executive Director, The Skeptics Society

Publisher; Skeptic Magazine

Corey Doctorow

"The Mind of the Market"

Dr. Michael Shermer is the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine (www.skeptic.com), the Executive Director of the Skeptics Society, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, the host of the Skeptics Distinguished Science Lecture Series at Caltech, and Adjunct Professor of Economics at Claremont Graduate University.
   Clemson’s John E. Walker Department of Economics is sponsoring his visit to our campus.  The department’s  interest in him is prompted by his recent book, The Mind of the Market, which combines evolutionary biology, behavioral economics, and liberal, market-oriented ideas.(more)

More on Dr. Michael Shermer

Sponsored by:

John E. Walker Department of Economics
Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
Department of Philosophy & Religion
 

October 27, 2008

Monday, 6:00PM
Strom Thurmond Institute

Ms. Linda Tarr-Whelan

Demos Distinguished Senior Fellow

Fmr. Ambassador to the UN Commission on the Status of Women

Corey Doctorow

"Women's Transformational Leadership: Often A Missed opportunity"

Ms. Linda Tarr-Whelan is Demos Distinguished Senior Fellow and Former Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. Named "one of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Washington" by Ladies Home Journal, Ms. Tarr-Whelan has been managing director with Tarr-Whelan & Associates, Inc. since 2000.(more)

More on Ms. Linda Tarr-Whelan

Sponsored by:

Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
President's Commission on the Status of Women at Clemson University
Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
Presidents Commission on the Status of Women

 

November 18, 2008

Tuesday, 7:00PM

Brooks Center for the Performing Arts

Ms. Anjana Gosain

Hon. Secretary, Tiger Trust India

Corey Doctorow

A Future without Tigers? Say it Isn’t So...

Ms. Anjana Gosain, Honorary Secretary, Tiger Trust India, will be here in November to do a colloquium talk, among other things, during International Education Week, Nov. 17-21, 2008.   Ms. Anjana Gosain is a leading lawyer in India, widely recognized as a crusader working to save wildlife in India; she is especially well-known for her work with the Tiger Trust and its Save the Tiger campaign, which involves students, professionals and corporate houses.

This event is a collaborative undertaking involving the Department of Biological Sciences, the Gantt Intercultural Center, the Honors College, the Rutland Institute and the student group, Tigers for Tigers (more)

More on Ms. Anjana Gosain

Sponsored by:

Rutland Institute for Ethics
Department of Biological Sciences
The Gantt Intercultural Center
The Calhoun Honors College
Tigers for Tigers

 

December 2, 2008
Tuesday, 3:30PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Matthew Connelly

Associate Professor of History; Columbia University

Matthew Connelly

"The Rise and Fall of the Population Control Movement: How Well-Meaning People Tried to Save the Planet but Made War on the  Poor"

Matthew Connelly is associate professor at Columbia University and the  author of Fatal Misconception, the first global history of the  population control movement. His research also spans the globe, including archives and interviews in ten countries, and has been published in leading journals in the U.S. and Europe. He has also  written on international affairs for The Atlantic Monthly, The  National Interest, and The Wilson Quarterly, and has provided  commentary for The New York Times, NPR, the BBC, and the History  Channel. His first book, A Diplomatic Revolution, won five prizes, and he has been named a "Top Young Historian" by the History News Network.  He received his B.A. from Columbia (1990) and his Ph.D. from Yale (1997).

Sponsored by:

The Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
Science and Technology in Society Program (STS)

 

SPRING 2009

 

February 9, 2009
Monday, 7:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Benjamin Hippen

Nephrologist

Ben Hippen

"The Wages of Success: Conventional and Controversial Solutions to the Moral Challenges of the Growing Shortage of Organs for Transplantation"

Benjamin Hippen, M.D., is a nephrologist with Metrolina Nephrology Associates, P.A. He is an at-large member of the Membership and Professional Standards Committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing, following the completion of a 3-year term on the Ethics Committee. (more)


Sponsored by:

The Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute

 

February 23, 2009
Monday, 4:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Shane Hamilton

Assistant Professor of History; University of Georgia

Ben Hippen

"Supermarkets and the Idea of Technological Progress in the American Century"

Shane Hamilton is an assistant professor at the University of Georgia, where he teaches and researches 20th-century U.S. history; agriculture and rural life; history of technology; and the history of capitalism. His first book, Trucking Country: The Road to America's Wal-Mart Economy, was published in 2008 by Princeton University Press. He has published articles and reviews in Agricultural History, Business History Review, Enterprise & Society, Reviews in American History, and Technology and Culture. He is currently working on a book project entitled "Supermarket USA: Food and Power in the American Century," which has been funded by a National Science Foundation Scholar's Award. The History News Network selected him in 2008 as a "Top Young Historian."(more)

Sponsored by:

The Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
Science and Technology in Society Program (STS)

 

February 11th - March 12th
Lee Gallery

Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition

Principles and Perspectives in Progress

"No Way Out "by Art Werger from Ohio
"No Way Out
by Art Werger

 

"Individual Story" by Chunwoo Nam from Indiana
"Individual Story"
by Chunwoo Nam

 

"Hungry Dogs" by Mark Hosford from Tennessee
"Hungry Dogs"
by Mark Hosford

The Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition

The Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Principles and Perspectives in Progress features 48 works. These works were selected by the 2009 juror, Carmon Colangelo, Dean of Fine Art, at Washington University, St. Louis. These 48 images by 28 artists were chosen from 365 images entered by 126 artists from across the U.S. This exhibition highlights the most current thinking and technical applications among artists utilizing drawing and printmaking processes. The works included in this exhibition also expand upon the 2009 Presidential Colloquium, Principles and Perspectives in Progress. The Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition originated in 1983 when Tom Dimond, Lee Gallery director and Professor Syd Cross collaborated to organize the first ever national juried exhibition at Clemson University. Nancy Hoffman, from Nancy Hoffman Gallery in New York, was the first juror. Since then the biennial event has enjoyed jurors such as Ned Rifkin, Howard Fox, Ken Tyler, Terence Le Noue, Eleanor Heartney and Hugh Merril. The Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition has a mission of identifying and exhibiting current work from artists across the nation.  

February 11

Visiting Artist Slide Lecture
Carmon Colangelo, juror for the Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition, will present a slide lecture about his own work.
Room 111, Lee Hall 5:00 p.m.

February 11

Clemson National Print and Drawing Exhibition
Juror’s gallery talk, exhibition awards presentation* and reception.
6:00-8:00 p.m.
*Exhibition awards were provided by the Presidential Colloquium and will be presented by Dr. Daniel E. Wueste, Director, Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics.

Award Winners

1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place

"No Way Out "by Art Werger from Ohio

"Individual Story" by Chunwoo Nam from Indiana

"Hungry Dogs" by Mark Hosford from Tennessee

"No Way Out "by Art Werger from Ohio
"Individual Story"  by Chunwoo Nam from Indiana
"Hungry Dogs" by Mark Hosford from Tennessee

**Please click picture for larger image**

Merit Recognitions

"Subservient Fornications with the Angel of Death"
by Christopher Cannon, Wisconsin
"Removed"
by Rachel Moreau from Washington (state)
"12/12/07"
by Joseph Lupo, West Virginia
"The Association for Creative Zoology Microterus trichopilaris"
by Beauvais Lyons, Tennessee
"Fay and Away 3 of 7"
by Kris Corso Tolmie, NY
"Beatrice and the Ladies"
by Michael Yeomans, NY


Sponsored by:

The Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
Lee Gallery

 

March 9, 2009
Monday, 4:00PM

Strom Thurmond Institute

Bryan Norton

Professor of Philosophy, Science and Technology

Ben Hippen

"How Facts Change Values: and Vice Versa"

Bryan Norton is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Science and Technology in the School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology and author of Why Preserve Natural Variety? (Princeton University Press, 1987), Toward Unity Among Environmentalists (Oxford University Press, 1991), Searching for Sustainability (Cambridge University Press, 2003), and Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management (University of Chicago Press, 2005). (more)

Promotional Flier


Sponsored by:

The Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Department of Philsophy & Religion
Clemson's program in Science and Technology
The Strom Thurmond Institute
The College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities

 

2009 Clemson Literary Festival

& South Carolina Review Fundraiser

Clemson Literary festival

 

 

2009 Clemson Literary Festival Flier
CLICK FOR FULL IMAGE

**Please note***
Due to potentially stormy weather tomorrow, the Abernathy Waterfront Park readings scheduled for Thursday, April 2nd from 4:30 to 7:30 have been relocated to Self-Auditorium at Strom Thurmond Institute, the safest building on CU’s campus during inclement weather.

 

The 2009 Clemson Literary Festival has partnered with Presidential Colloquium to present a three-day festival, featuring readings by poets and fiction writers from across the country at various downtown Clemson locations, a book fair in Hendrix Student Center, panel discussions at McKissick Theater, and two children’s literature events at The Arts Center (city of Clemson). In an increasingly digital age, questions about the evolution of literature and writing are paramount to the advancement of liberal arts and personal aesthetic development.

All events are FREE of charge and open to the public. Please encourage friends, family, and colleagues to join us for three days full of imagination, entertainment, and discussion about the literary arts. Come out early to get a seat.
For more information and a complete schedule of events, please visit our websites listed below or contact Adam Million, festival organizer, at million@clemson.edu or by phone at 864-656-5411.
Clemson Literary Festival on MySpace, including blogs and photos:
http://www.myspace.com/clemsonliteraryfestival

Center for Electronic and Digital Publishing Writer’s Nook:
www.virtual.clemson.edu/caah/cedp/cudp/writers_nook/litfest.htm

Clemson English Department’s Special Events – archives of last year’s festival:
http://www.clemson.edu/caah/english/specialevents/literaryfestival/

SEE FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

 

 

These events are upcoming; check back later for more information:

  • None at this time

 

For more information contact:

Daniel E. Wueste, Ph.D.
Director, Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
864-656-6147; Fax: 864-656-2858
Office email: ernest@clemson.edu
www.clemson.edu/ethics

 

More about the colloquium:

From the beginning, the theme of the colloquium  has been a central focus in English Composition classes.  However, the link to course work is not confined to English classes.  Faculty across campus are encouraged to make the most of it in preparing syllabi for the upcoming academic year.   In 2001, for example, the theme was “Science and Values: New Frontiers, Perennial Questions.”  The subject of human cloning, which was addressed by one of the major speakers, was explored in many classes in the life sciences, humanities, and social sciences.  Students who participated in the First Annual J.T. Barton Jr., Ethics Essay Scholarship Competition also explored it. (The competition is sponsored by the Rutland Institute for Ethics.)  Linking the colloquium and the ethics essay competition turned out to be a very good thing.  Accordingly, we continue to link them.