Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
2010-11 Presidential Colloquium...

Changes, Choices, Challenges

The aim of the Presidential Colloquium, which is moving into its tenth year, is to provide opportunities for Clemson University students and faculty, as well as members of the community to come together to explore important issues.  The colloquium comprises various events spread over the academic year, e.g., speakers, theatrical performances, panel discussions, and films.  In every case the event is linked to the colloquium theme, which is selected with an eye to its integration “across the curriculum."

The basic idea comes from The Speed of Dark (the freshman summer reading book), where, because of a change in leadership where they work, the main character and his colleagues face a difficult choice. The choice involves risks, as the treatment option they are presented with would change their personalities and ways of thinking in ways that could be positive or negative.  They could choose not to accept the treatment, but in that case too, their situation would change and present them with major challenges.
 
Changes, choices and challenges seem to cluster together forcing consideration of risks, of cost and benefit, of potential harms and gains for individuals as well as the organizations and communities they belong to.  Moreover, they prompt us to wonder about who we are, what we will be, and what endures as we change and deal with the challenges our choices create.

The events of the colloquium will explore this theme in a number of topic areas:  

Economics Politics Medicine
Race relations Gender Sustainability
Professions Education the Clemson experience
Criminal justice
Science and Technology in Society


FALL 2009 / SPRING 2010

 

FALL 2009

October 28, 2009
Wednesday 7:30PM
Strom Thurmond Institute

Diane Ferlatte

Grammy-nominated storyteller to weave tales at Clemson

Diane Ferlatte

Diane Ferlatte

Internationally renowned storyteller Diane Ferlatte will perform at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 28, in Clemson University’s Self Auditorium of the Strom Thurmond Institute.

Ferlatte is known for her tales focusing on the history, struggles and triumphs of African Americans. Her repertoire also includes stories about the South and personal stories, as well as tales she has collected from her travels across the globe.

In addition to her 2008 Grammy nomination, Ferlatte has received honors and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Storytelling Network's Circle of Excellence Award, the National Association of Black Storytellers’ Zora Neale Hurston Award, as well as the California Arts Council's highest ranking.

She has performed at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, Tenn.; the Tales of Graz, in Graz, Austria; the First International Festival to Commemorate the End of Slavery, on Goree Island, Senegal; and at President Bill Clinton's first inauguration.

Wednesday’s performance is part of Clemson University's Presidential Colloquium Series, and is sponsored by the Rutland Institute for Ethics.  Ferlatte’s visit to the Upstate was arranged by Southern Wesleyan University.

Admission is free and the public is invited to attend.

For details, call (864) 656-7729.

http://www.dianeferlatte.com/

 

Sponsored By:

The Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
CU Chief Diversity Office
Pan-African Studies
Harvey and Lucinda Gantt Center for Student Life
Clemson Campus Ministries
Philosophy & Religion Department
Calhoun Honors College

 

SPRING 2010

February 10, 2010
Wednesday 7:00PM
Strom Thurmond Institute

Dr. Karen Cox

Author, Associate Professor, History at the UNC-Charlotte

Director of the Center for the Study of the New South

Diane Ferlatte

Dr. Karen Cox

 

 

 

 

 

Dixie’s Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture

 

Mammies, Belles and Hillbilly Gals:
Southern Women in the American Imagination,1880-1950

Karen L. Cox is an Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where she also serves as Director of the Center for the Study of the New South and was the founding director of the public history program. She is the author of Dixie’s Daughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture, which won the 2004 Julia Cherry Spruill Prize given by the Southern Association for Women Historians for the best book in southern women’s history.

She has published several essays and articles about southern culture and her current scholarship examines perceptions of the South and Southerners in mass culture from the late nineteenth century through World War II.

Sponsored by the Department of History and the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities through an endowment given by Edythe and Robert Lambert in memory of their daughter.

Admission is free and the public is invited to attend.

Dr. Cox will be available after the lecture to sign her book Dixie’sDaughters: The United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Preservation of Confederate Culture.

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored By:

The Dorothy Lambert Whisnant Lecture on Women’s History
The Clemson University History Department
The Rutland Institute for Ethics
The Strom Thurmond Institute
The College of Architecture, Arts & Humanities

 

April 7, 2010
Wednesday 7:00PM
Tillman Hall Auditorium

Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Ph.D.

Director of Education, National Catholic Bioethics Center

Author 

Dr. Stephen Napier

Staff Ethicist, National Catholic Bioethics Center

Author

Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Ph.D.

Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Ph.D.

 

Dr. Stephen Napier

Dr. Stephen Napier

 

Science, Medicine and Ethics:

Assisted Reproductive Technologies and “Octomom”

 

Rev. Tadeusz Pacholczyk, Ph.D. is Director of Education at the National Catholic Bioethics Center and author of Making Sense Out of Bioethics.  Rev. Pacholczyk has a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Yale University and is a molecular biologist and researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. He has appeared on CNN, ABC World News Tonight, EWTN, and National Public Radio.

 

Dr. Stephen Napier is a staff ethicist at the National Catholic Bioethics Center and author of Virtue Epistemology: Motivation and Knowledge. Dr. Napier has a Ph.D. in Philosophy from St. Louis University and currently serves on a University of Pennsylvania Institutional Review Board. He has also contributed to the journals Sophia, The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly and Ethics and Medics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored By:

CU Students for Life
The Rutland Institute for Ethics

 

 

 

 

These events are upcoming; check back later for more information:

  • None at this time

 

For more information contact:

Daniel E. Wueste, Ph.D.
Director, Robert J. Rutland Institute for Ethics
864-656-6147; Fax: 864-656-2858
Office email: ernest@clemson.edu
www.clemson.edu/ethics

 

More about the colloquium:

From the beginning, the theme of the colloquium  has been a central focus in English Composition classes.  However, the link to course work is not confined to English classes.  Faculty across campus are encouraged to make the most of it in preparing syllabi for the upcoming academic year.   In 2001, for example, the theme was “Science and Values: New Frontiers, Perennial Questions.”  The subject of human cloning, which was addressed by one of the major speakers, was explored in many classes in the life sciences, humanities, and social sciences.  Students who participated in the First Annual J.T. Barton Jr., Ethics Essay Scholarship Competition also explored it. (The competition is sponsored by the Rutland Institute for Ethics.)  Linking the colloquium and the ethics essay competition turned out to be a very good thing.  Accordingly, we continue to link them.