Fruit Syrups & Honeys

This information has been reviewed and adapted for use in South Carolina by P.H. Schmutz, HGIC Information Specialist, and E.H. Hoyle, Extension Food Safety Specialist, Clemson University. New 05/99. Revised 06/01.)

HGIC 3165

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Fruit Syrups

Juices from fresh or frozen blueberries, cherries, grapes, raspberries (black or red) and strawberries are easily made into toppings for use on ice cream, pancakes and pastries. Fruit syrups are made by cooking fruit juice or pulp with sugar to the consistency of syrup.

Berry Syrup

Ingredients:

1¼ cups prepared blackberry, blueberry, raspberry or strawberry juice
1½ cups sugar
¼ cup corn syrup
1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice

Yield: About 2 half-pint jars

To Prepare Juice:  Select table-ripe berries.  Do not use underripe berries.  Wash, cap and remove stems.  Crush berries and heat to a boil.  Simmer 1 or 2 minutes until soft, stirring to prevent scorching.  Do not overcook; excess boiling will destroy the pectin, flavor and color.  Note:  Juicy berries may be crushed and the juice extracted without heating.

To Extract Juice:  Pour everything into a damp jelly bag or four layers of cheesecloth, and suspend the bag to drain the juice.  The clearest jelly or syrup comes from juice that has dripped through a jelly bag without pressing or squeezing.

To Make Syrup:  Sterilize canning jars. Combine ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a rolling boil and boil one minute. Remove from heat and skim off foam. Pour into hot half-pint jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Grape Syrup

Ingredients:

1¼ cups grape purée
1½ cups sugar
¼ cup corn syrup
1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice

Yield: About 2 half-pint jars

To Prepare Purée: Wash and stem ripe grapes. In a large saucepot heat grapes at a low heat setting for 8 to 10 minutes to loosen skins. DO NOT BOIL. Put through a food mill or wide mesh strainer. Discard skins and seeds.

To Make Syrup: Sterilize canning jars. Combine ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a rolling boil and boil about 1 minute. Remove from heat and skim off foam. Pour into hot half-pint jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids and process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Fruit Honey Recipes

This sweet fruit product has the consistency of honey, is flavorful and a good way to use all of the fruit being preserved.

General Directions

Save all washed, sound pieces and peelings from fruit used for preserves, pickles, etc. Keep refrigerated until ready to use. Cover with water and slowly cook in a covered saucepan until soft. Then put in a cheesecloth bag and press to remove all juice. Drip the juice through a jelly bag and measure. Place in saucepan and heat. When it boils vigorously, add sugar at the rate of one-half as much sugar as juice. Boil rapidly until consistency of honey then pour into hot jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Strawberry Honey

8 cups strawberry juice
4 cups sugar

Follow general directions above for making juice. Sterilize canning jars. Wash and cap strawberries. Crush and add 1 cup water to 1 quart berries. Cook slowly for 15 minutes; strain, measure and bring to boil. When it boils vigorously, add sugar. Boil rapidly until the consistency of honey. Pour into hot jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Peach Honey

8 cups peach juice (from peelings)
4 cups sugar

Make juice according to general directions. Sterilize canning jars. Measure juice, bring to boil. When it boils vigorously, add sugar. Boil rapidly until the consistency of honey. Pour into hot jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Pear Honey

8 cups pear juice (from peelings)
4 cups sugar
Juice of 1 lemon (if desired)

Make juice according to general directions. Sterilize canning jars. Measure juice, bring to boil. When it boils vigorously, add sugar and lemon juice. Boil rapidly until the consistency of honey. Pour into hot jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe jar rims and adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water bath.

For information on making jelly, request HGIC 3180, Basics of Jelly Making, and HGIC 3200, Jelly and Jam Recipes.   For more information on home canning, contact your local Extension Service agent.

Source:

Reynolds, Susan and Paulette Williams. So Easy to Preserve. Bulletin 989. Cooperative Extension Service, the University of Georgia, Athens. Fourth edition revised by Elizabeth Andress and Judy Harrison, 1999.

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