White Clover

Millie Davenport,
HGIC Horticulture Extension Agent, Clemson University

White Clover
White clover flower with pink color.
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

White clover (Trifolium repens), also known as Dutch clover, is a cool-season perennial that is often found growing in patches along roadsides and in pastures and lawns. It is a low-growing plant with creeping stems (stolons) that produce roots and shoots at nodes (joints) along the stem, which helps the plant to spread. It has trifoliate leaves which consist of 3 oval-shaped leaflets. There is usually a characteristic white, crescent-shaped band on each leaflet. White flowers (often tinged with pink) appear in early summer. The flower heads consist of 40 to 80 florets (individual flowers) in a cluster measuring ½ to 1½ inches in diameter. It reproduces by seed and by creeping stolons.
For more information see, HGIC 2324 White Clover.

 

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