University Facilities

Campus Bikeways - Implementation

  • Priority Projects +

    Non-University Road Maintenance ResponsibilityPrioritizing projects is an important part of implementing a network of bicycle facilities. A list of the top priority bikeway projects are found in this section along with prioritized project lists for interior campus roads, forest and exterior campus roads, shared use paths and mountain bike trails. Addressing implementation for intersection, bicycle parking, trailhead and wayfinding is also included.

    The implementation of bikeways can occur as designated bikeway project pieces as well as a part of repaving, road widening and building site construction and repair projects. Updating roadways to accommodate bicycles according to the plan may make sense during general road construction projects. Installing bikeways on several roads at the same time should also be considered. For example, the cost of pavement markings on shared roadways is relatively small, and developing a plan to mark several roads at once will keep the cost of labor down. Implementing the bikeway network should occur over time, as project scheduling and budgets allow.

    Even though the lists found in this section have been prioritized, completing a bikeway project when a roadway is ripe for resurfacing should not be overlooked just because others with a higher priority have not been installed. The lists are meant to guide bikeway development, and not necessarily as a hard and fast rule.

    The University and SCDOT will be the implementing agencies on many roads at the University. Many of the major roads, like Perimeter Road and Old Greenville Hwy, are part of the SCDOT maintenance system. The two agencies will need to coordinate development and on-going maintenance. The University may need to work with the Army Corps of Engineers for any proposed projects that run along the water front. Maintenance on other roads like Williamson and McMillan is covered by the University.

    Bikeway facility improvements for roads in the North and South pieces of the Clemson Experimental Forest will be different. In the South Forest, Queens Road and Fant’s Grove Road are maintained by SCDOT. Implementation along the roadway will need to be coordinated between Clemson University and SCDOT. In the North Forest, Old Six Mile and Old Jewell Bridge Road are maintained by Pickens County. Any improvements along these roadways will need to be coordinated between Clemson University and Pickens County. The map to the right outlines state and county road maintenance, as they fall within the boundaries of University properties on proposed bikeways.

  • Bikeway Infrastructure Prioritization +

    Proposed infrastructure improvements in the plan include over 40 miles of new bikeway facilities, with 27.62 miles of on-street bikeways. Implementation will help promote safety and provide a comprehensive, connected bikeway for the extended campus. Pavement markings and signage will support the network by providing identification and a means of wayfinding. Shared use paths and mountain bike trails will provide recreational riding options for many bicyclists.

    To help determine which projects are a high priority to implement, two sets of criteria are developed that highlight the features most important to developing a bikeway network: Bikeway Prioritization and Safety Concerns. Each criteria statement was given a ranking range that demonstrated its value compared to the other statements. Each bikeway project segment was evaluated using both priority worksheets. A cumulative score for each bikeway project segment was found by adding up the total scores from both criteria sets. A copy of each set of criteria can be found in the tables below.

    Bikeway Prioritization

    Safety Concerns

  • Top On-Road Bikeway Projects +

    A list of the highest scoring on-road bikeway projects is listed below. These bikeway projects are critical to implementing a comprehensive, connected bikeway network at Clemson University. They are important projects that should be considered first as the University moves forward to build a better network to support bicyclists. See the Bikeways Project Segment maps section for a map with marked project segments. 

    Top On-Road Bikeway Projects
    Project Segment Project Segment Number Boundaries Bikeway Facility Cumulative Score
    Cherry Rd 1 Old Greenville Hwy to McMillan Bike Lane 80 pts
    Calhoun Dr 2 Old Greenville Hwy to Fernow St Shared Roadway Bike Lane 77 pts
    McMillan Rd 3 Cherry Rd to Library Shared Roadway 77 pts
    Cherry Rd Extension 4 Cherry Rd to Martin Rd Bike Lane 77 pts
    Old Greenville Hwy 5 Williamson Rd to Cherry Rd Shared Roadway 75 pts
    Old Greenville Hwy 6 Cherry Rd to Hwy 76 Bike Lane 75 pts
    Williamson Rd 7 Old Greenville Hwy to Perimeter Rd Bike Lane 75 pts
    Cherry Rd 8 Mc Millan Rd to Old Cherry Rd Bike Lane 74 pts
    Sherman St 9 Old Greenville Hwy extending to beyond the University Foundation Bike Lane/Shared Use Path 74 pts
    Perimeter Rd 10 Old Greenville Hwy to Cherry Rd Bike Lane Bike Lane 73 pts
    Fort Hill St 11 Williamson Rd to Calhoun Dr Shared Roadway 73 pts
  • Bikeway Project Segment Maps +

    Campus Bikeways Project Segments
    Campus to North Forest Bikeway Project Endpoints Campus to South Forest Bikeway Project Endpoints

  • Interior Campus On-Road Bikeway Projects +

    Developing an integrated network of bikeways on interior campus roads will help bicyclists travel around the campus along preferred routes, arrive at destinations and provide an increased sense of safety. The following prioritized list is for bikeways on the interior campus roads. Each project’s cumulative score is also listed. See the Bikeways Project Segment maps section for a map with marked project segments.

    Interior Campus On-Road Bikeway Projects
    Project Segment Project Segment Number Boundaries Bikeway Facility Cumulative Score
    Lambda St 47 Williamson Rd to Lee Hall Trl Shared Roadway 72 pts
    S Palmetto Blvd 12 Williamson Rd to Library Shared Roadway 72 pts
    Parkway Dr 13 Old Greenville Hwy to Cherry Rd Shared Roadway 71 pts
    Fernow St 14 Calhoun Dr Shared Roadway 71 pts
    Jersey Ln 15 Cherry Rd Shared Roadway 69 pts
    Heisman Dr 16 Perimeter Rd to Klugh Ave Shared Roadway 68 pts
    Zeta Theta St 17 Cherry Rd to Perimeter Rd Shared Roadway 68 pts
    McMillan Rd 18 Cherry Rd to Perimeter Rd Bike Lane 67 pts
    Avenue of Champions 19 Perimeter Rd to Williamson Rd Shared Roadway 66 pts
    Garden Trail 20 Perimeter Rd Shared Roadway 65 pts
    McGinty Court 21 McMillan Rd Shared Roadway 64 pts
    Klugh Ave 22 Heisman Dr to Fort Hill St Shared Roadway 64 pts
    Morrison Dr 23 Newman Rd to Calhoun Courts Shared Roadway 61 pts
  • Forest and Exterior Campus On-Road Bikeway Projects +

    Many students, staff and faculty live off campus, and providing bikeways on the periphery of campus provides important entry and exit points for bicyclists. There are recreational opportunities at the beach, the Botanical Gardens and in the Forest that are also accessible by bicycle. Some of the bikeways will also provide connecting points to future off-campus networks. Getting to the campus, the beach and the North and South pieces of the Forest by bike will be enhanced by developing the following prioritized list of bikeways. Each project’s cumulative score is listed. TSee the Bikeways Project Segment maps section for a map with marked project segments.

    Forest and Exterior Campus On-Road Bikeway Projects
    Project Segment Project Segment Number Boundaries Bikeway Facility Cumulative Score
    Perimeter Rd 24 McMillan Rd to Hwy 76 Bike Lane 72 pts
    Martin St. 25 Daniel Dr to Wyatt Ave Shared Roadway 72 pts
    Bikeway to South Forest* 26 Old Cherry Rd, Queen St Bike Lane 72 pts
    Perimeter Rd 27 Cherry Rd to McMillan Rd Bike Lane 69 pts
    Paved Bikeway in North Forest 28 Old Six Mile Rd, Old Jewell Bridge Rd Shared Roadway 69 pts
    Old Greenville Hwy 29 Seneca Creek to Perimeter Rd Bike Lane 68 pts
    Paved Bikeway in South Forest 30 Queen St, Fant’s Grove Rd Shared Roadway 68 pts
    Old Greenville Hwy 21 Perimeter Rd to Williamson Rd Bike Lane 66 pts
    Madren Center Rd 32 Old Stadium Rd Shared Roadway 65 pts
    Jervey Meadows 33 Perimeter Rd Shared Roadway 64 pts
    Newman Rd 34 Old Greenville Hwy to McMillan Rd Shared Roadway 63 pts
    Old Stadium Rd 35 Perimeter Rd to Cherry Rd Bike Lane 62 pts
    East Beach Dr 36 Perimeter Rd Shared Roadway 61 pts
    Old Stone Church 37 Old Cherry Rd to Hwy 76 Bike Lane 61 pts
    YMCA Circle 38 Old Greenville Hwy Shared Roadway 58 pts

    *Contains “Critical Intersection Improvement Area” mentioned in Section 5. Recommendations.

  • Shared Use Path Projects +

    Shared use paths provide places for bicycles and pedestrians to co-exist along non-motorized transportation routes. Shared use paths may be designed and used primarily for transportation, recreation or both. Paths should be designed to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians equitably. The following prioritized list of shared paths will help with project implementation. Each project’s cumulative score is listed. See the Bikeways Project Segment maps section for a map with marked project segments.

    Shared Use Path Projects
    Project Segment Project Segment Numbers Boundaries Cumulative Score
    Douthit Hills Shared Use Path 39 Douthit Hill Development area 77 pts
    Calhoun Courts Shared Use Path 40 Morrison Dr to Cherry Rd 70 pts
    Lee Hall Trail 46 Fernow St to Lambda St 62 pts
    Dike Shared Use Path 41 Madren Center to Old Greenville Hwy 69 pts
    Dike Shared Use Path 42 Old Greenville Hwy to City of Clemson boundary 68 pts
    Trail East of Hwy 76 43 Hwy 93 to Pendleton Rd 66 pts
    Jersey Lane/McGinty Court Connection 44 Jersey Lane to McGinty Court 62 pts
    Jervey Meadows Trail Extension 45 Jervey Meadows Rd to East Beach Dr. 59 pts
    Beach Path 48 Campus Beach Site 59 pts
  • Intersections +

    Priority IntersectionsHelping motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists move through an intersection is important in developing a comprehensive, connected bikeway network. Using guidance from the Bikeway Design Guidelines (found in the Appendix), the plan recommends installing bicycle detection devices at the actuated intersections along the existing and proposed bikeways. The University should also consider installing bicycle detection devices at all other actuated intersections. Implementation should occur in conjunction with signal or intersection upgrade projects and in coordination with SCDOT. Facility improvements should begin with the following list of intersections, and other projects should be installed over time. Bicycle detection devices should be installed on the primary road as it intersects the cross street, as listed in the table. Intersections that may be ripe for the installation of bike boxes in the future have also been listed, pending coordination and approval with SCDOT. (See the Recommendations section or the Bikeway Design Guidelines for more information on bike boxes.) Please see the map to the right for more information.

    Priority Intersections
    Primary Road Cross Street Possible future bike box intersections
    Cherry Rd McMillan Rd x
    Old Greenville Hwy Hwy 76  
    Perimeter Rd Hwy 76  
    Old Greenville Hwy Cherry Rd x
    College Avenue Old Greenville Hwy x
    Old Greenville Hwy Calhoun Dr  
    Old Greenville Hwy Williamson Rd x
    Old Greenville Hwy Perimeter Rd  
  • Wayfinding +

    Implementing a bikeways wayfinding system should occur once major segments of the bikeway facilities have been installed. Wayfinding elements should follow guidance from the Bikeway Design Guidelines and University Sign Design Guidelines. Pavement markings that are part of the system should be installed following state and national standards. In some cases, using or making minor improvements to the University’s existing wayfinding signs may be appropriate.

  • Bicycle Parking +

    A bike rack inventory was completed, providing insights on the current bicycle parking facilities. A bicycle parking section that explores the existing types and locations of the bicycle parking facilities, explanations of the different kinds and possible suggestions for future investments is included in the appendix. This information can be used to help with any updates to and investments in future bicycle parking facilities. The Bicycle Design Guidelines contain updated standards for preferred bike rack type and placement and guidance for long term bicycle parking. As sites on the campus, beach and forest are scheduled for construction, renovation and updating, provision for the quantity, placement, role and bicycle parking facility type should be included. Consideration should also be given to developing a plan for priority bike parking installation, which could be a stand-alone plan or part of an alternative transportation plan. User input should be obtained in the decision-making process to gain valuable insights in bicycle parking priority areas.

  • Mountain Biking Trails +

    The primary mountain bike trails that are outlined in the plan overlay current trails in the forest. To establish each route as a primary mountain biking facility, each trail should be reviewed for possible material and design improvements to enhance a mountain bike rider’s safety and experience. Each trail should be designed and maintained for the novice rider. Considerations for possible connections to other mountain bike trails should also be given as well as directions on how other, non-mountain bike riders are permitted on the trail. After trail revisions are complete, trail markers should be designed and installed along the path with important information like trail direction, trail outlets or escape and mileage to trailhead.

    In completing the evaluation criteria, the primary mountain biking trail in the North and South Forest was found to have the same cumulative score. Installation of each trail should be considered equally important in providing more recreational riding opportunities through the University. Further analysis may be necessary to establish which trail should be developed first.

    1. Primary Mountain Bike Trail, North Forest (60 pts)
    2. Primary Mountain Bike Trail, South Forest (60 pts)
  • Trailheads +

    Before installation, trailhead designers should obtain input from the users of the forest, especially from the Forest Manager and mountain bike riders. Consideration should be given to how forest trail markers, campus bikeway signage and the trailheads will relate and how users may interact with it. Some elements of the trailhead should be designed to accommodate information changes over time. Installation of trailheads at the designated areas should occur once the primary mountain bike trails have been established and more clearly marked.

  • Infrastructure Improvement Preliminary Cost Estimates and Total Mileage +

    The following tables provide information on the planning-level cost estimates for the network of bikeway facilities recommended in the Clemson University Bikeway Plan and total mileage. The cost of bikeway facility types vary greatly. For example, placing shared lane markings on existing roadways costs significantly much less per mile than installing bike lanes. However, some roadways require a more robust bikeway facility to enhance the bicycling experience. Therefore, different roadway treatments are necessary to provide adequate bikeway facilities for all users. The estimates listed in Table 8 include the total planning, engineering, environmental and contingency costs. The table below shows estimates for total project mileage. A total bikeways cost estimate is not given because some facility costs estimates have wide ranges.

    Preliminary Project Cost Estimates
    Facility Cost Materials Additional Costs
    Bola Bike Rack (ea) preferred bike rack $210 Rack 30%
    *Singletrack Mountain Bike Trail, difficult conditions (lin. ft) $6 Soft Surfaces (gravel, rock fines) 30%
    *Singletrack Mountain Bike Trail, difficult conditions (lin. ft) $3 Soft Surfaces (gravel, rock fines) 30%
    *Singletrack Mountain Bike Trail, repair (lin. ft) $1 Soft Surfaces (gravel, rock fines) 30%
    Bike Wash Station $2,500 Gravel, Hose, Bike Hanging Rack, Water Source 30% + water service
    Loop Detectors (ea) $1,500 Detector, Stencil, Labor, Signs 30%
    Bike Box (ea) $5,000 Thermoplastic, Signage 30%
    Signs: Share the Road (ea) $150 Signs, Posts 15%
    Signs: Wayfinding (ea) $200 Signs, Posts 15%
    Trailhead $9,000 - $12,000 Map Board, Kiosik 30%
    Pavement Marking: Shared Roadway (ea) $200 Stencils (20 per mile) 30%
    Pavement Marking: Bike route (per mile) $2,600 Pavement stamp 30%
    Shared Lane Markings (per mile) $6,500 Pavement Marking, Signage 30%
    Bike Lanes: Restripe w/ resurfacing project (per mile) $8,000 Striping, Signage 30%
    Bike Lanes: Restripe (per mile), retrofit on street $15,000 Striping, Signage 30%
    Bike Lanes: Add pavement, no curb with resurfacing (per mile) $28,000 Asphalt, Striping, Signage 30%
    Bike Lanes: On-street widening w/ curb & gutter (per mile) $250,000 Roadway Widening 40%
    Shared Use Path (per mile) $300,000 - $800,000 Construction, Signage 30%
    Preliminary Total Project Miles
    Project Type Total Miles
    Bike Lane 9.5
    Shared Roadway 18.12
    Shared Use Path 4.44
    Mountain Bike Trail 9.19
    On-Road Bikeways (Bike Lanes + Shared Roadways) 27.62
    Off-Road (Shared Use Paths + Mountain Bike Trails) 13.63
    Clemson University Bikeways 41.25

    *Costs may be less if volunteers are used for appropriate tasks in some phases of development.

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