Tag archive for CoES

Ribbon of light

John Ballato’s lab in COMSET created this ribbon of polypropylene film with light-emitting nanoparticles carefully dispersed within to maintain clarity and supply a brilliant green.

Continue Reading→

quantum heretic

In the warm winter sunshine, a distinguished man stands on the curb outside a local bank, wearing a casual jacket, his dark, curly hair stranded with silver.

Continue Reading→

a gear head goes bio

His was not the usual path to a job fighting cancer. Stephen Foulger was a California dude, a surfer and gear head who built motorcycles.

Continue Reading→

No, we don’t make eyeglasses.

This is what Eric Johnson has to explain, outside of work. But what he does make, with his team of savvy students, takes vision.

Continue Reading→

aiming plasmas at cancer

Sung-O Kim came to COMSET to work on displays and wound up taking aim at cancer. Not that cancer is the lab’s only target. Kim and his students use plasmas to make all sorts of things.

Continue Reading→

how to stop an atom

Sooner or later, technology’s pursuit of ever-smaller devices leads it down the rabbit hole and into the realm of quantum mechanics, where the hot dance of atoms makes assembling tiny structures iffy.

Continue Reading→

well-dressed particles

As any teenager might guess, what a particle wears affects its game. Thompson Mefford’s lab turns out designer wardrobes for nanoparticles that can, for instance, target a receptor site or smuggle things inside a cell.

Continue Reading→

Material advantage and the power of light

Fiber optics spread the Internet around the globe, but the science of light is just warming up. And so is the science of rust.

Continue Reading→

As close as someone you care about

Brian Booth is looking for a way to tame a wild child. Cancer is genetics’ wild child, relentless, growing from cell to tumor, restless, reaching from brain to bone, reckless, destroying even the body it makes home.

Continue Reading→

Probing a mystery at the edge of space

On a clear night in March, five rockets pierce the sky above the coast of Virginia. As the roar of their departure fades, they grow ever smaller and disappear into darkness.

Continue Reading→