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Lindsay Long: Investigating the Usability of a Vibrotactile Torso Display for Improving Simulated Teleoperation Obstacle Avoidance

Lindsay Long will defend her thesis proposal on Tuesday, October 26 at 4:15 PM in the Psychology Conference Room, Room 419 Brackett. The abstract is below and a flyer is attached.

Abstract:

The goal of the proposed study is to determine the degree to which a vibrotactile torso belt can improve unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) teleoperation performance over visual displays. Previous literature on the ability of haptic feedback to augment visual displays indicates that obstacle avoidance information may be more meaningfully communicated via vibrotactile torso systems, though there is no empirical evidence to support this. Tactile torso systems deliver feedback more intuitively than visual and graphical displays but they have not been incorporated into UGV teleoperation displays to improve obstacle avoidance. Presenting this information so that operators could accurately detect the proximity from walls and obstructions could result in a significant reduction in errors, ultimately improving task performance and increasing the usability of teleoperation.

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Lindsay E. Sears: Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles Among Nurses

Defense Title:  Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles Among Nurses

Committee:

Dr. Robert R. Sinclair, Committee Chair

Dr. Tom Britt

Dr. DeWayne Moore

Dr. Patrick Rosopa

Date: October 15, 2010

Time: 2pm

Location: Brackett 414

Abstract:

Occupational turnover is a costly problem afflicting much of the nursing
industry, and occupational commitment is a strong predictor of withdrawal
from one’s profession. Traditional organizational research examines most
commitment-behavior relationships from a variable-centered perspective,
focusing on the relationships between constructs. The present study adopts a
configural, or person-centered approach aimed at identifying and describing
clusters of individuals who share a similar set of occupational commitment
mindsets. The present study extends current literature by a) investigating
the existence of several occupational commitment profiles and describing
their characteristics; b) examining situational and demographic predictors
of profile membership; and c) testing differences in occupational withdrawal
intentions across the occupational commitment profiles. I examined these
questions longitudinally using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) in an archival
data set of Registered Nurses from different organizations in the
Northwestern United States. Five distinct profiles of occupational
commitment among nurses emerged – free agent, allied, complacent, attached,
and devoted – each differing with respect to their predictors, outcomes, and
degree of stability over time. While there were few demographic differences
across profiles, the frequency of successes, supports, and demands on the
job appear to play an important role in the development of occupational
commitment mindsets. Profiles were also characterized by their varying
effects on withdrawal from the occupation. The findings supplemented results
gleaned from more traditional hierarchical regression techniques. Additional
implications and future directions for research are discussed.

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Clemson @ HFES in San Francisco

Several students and faculty presented at the annual HFES conference in San Francisco.  Thanks to the student chapter for sponsoring Clemson Cocktail Hour.


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Human Factors Discussion Group 10/8/2010

For this week’s Human Factors Discussion Group Nicole Fink will speak about her summer internship at Blackbaud in Charleston.

We will meet on Friday at 1:30 in the Psychology Conference Room, 419 Brackett Hall (accessible through room 418, across from the top of the ‘angled’ atrium stairs).

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Human Factors Discussion Group 9/24/2010

For this week’s HF Discussion group Eric and Adam are asking for input on the design of their new Bite Counter.

What is a Bite Counter? In their Clemson research programs Drs. Eric Muth and Adam Hoover have developed a way to determine when an individual takes a bite of food by tracking wrist role motion. Clemson University has filed a patent on the method. Eric and Adam have formed a company, Bite Technologies, licensing the technology from Clemson University to develop the method into a Bite Counter device that can be worn on the wrist like a large watch and that can keep a bite count in the way a pedometer keeps a step count. The device is currently in the design phase, just before manufacturing. This Friday Eric will present the process associated with the design of the wearable device and various design decisions and options will be discussed.

As usual, we will meet Friday at 1:30 in the Psychology Conference Room, 419 Brackett Hall (accessible through room 418, across from the top of the ‘angled’ atrium stairs).

Due to the annual HFES meeting there will be not be a discussion group meeting next week.

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HFDG for 9/10/2010

For this week’s Human Factors Discussion Group Matt St Pierre will speak about what he did over the summer.

We will meet on Friday at 1:30 in the Psychology Conference Room, 419 Brackett Hall (accessible through room 418, across from the top of the ‘angled’ atrium stairs).

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Dr. Karin Meissner: Visiting lecture on the placebo effect

Visiting lecture on the placebo effect.

Dr. Karin Meissner

Institute of Medical Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany

When: Friday Sept 3, 1:30 pm

Where: 224 Brackett

Sponsored by The Department of Psychology jointly with the Human Factors and Ergonomics Research Institute

All are welcome.  Please distribute freely.

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Human Factors Discussion Group 8/27/10

Our first Human Factors Discussion Group meeting will be this Friday at 1:30 in the Psychology Conference Room, 419 Brackett Hall (accessible through room 418, across from the top of the ‘angled’ atrium stairs).

Stephanie Whetzel, a second year HF student, will speak about what she did over the summer.

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Reeve Goodenough: The Geometric Field of View and Speed Perception in a Driving Simulator

Reeve Goodenough will defend his Masters Thesis on Friday September 3rd at 11:15am in Brackett 419

All are welcome to attend.

The title of his thesis is: The Geometric Field of View and Speed Perception in a Driving Simulator

Abstract:

Particularly in the health and rehabilitation sector where cost and space are constraints, practitioners are using smaller driving simulators.  Because these small-footprint driving simulators have a limited projected field of view (PFOV) it is desirable to extend the virtual or geometric field of view (GFOV) beyond that natively afforded by the PFOV.   Changing the PFOV/GFOV ratio has been shown to alter perceived speed.  In order for driving simulation to produce realistic experiences, drivers’ perception of speed should correspond with real world experiences.  The purpose of the current research was to better understand the relationship between speed perception and the GFOV/PFOV ratio in a way that would be useful to simulation practitioners using a small-footprint driving simulator.  Participants performed a speed matching task using different six GFOV conditions while the PFOV was held constant.  Three target speeds were presented in appropriate simulated environments: 25mph in a residential area, 45mph in a commercial area, and 65mph on a freeway.  Perceived speed was found to increase with larger GFOVs.  However, no GFOV tested produced accurate speed perception; on average, all participants underestimated their speeds using all GFOVs.  A regression was used to estimate at which GFOV error in speed production would approach zero.  Subjective data collected regarding participant strategy, perceived accuracy, and their awareness of different GFOV conditions are also discussed.

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Human Factors Discussion Group

This semester the Human Factors Discussion Group will meet Fridays 1:30 – 2:30 in the Psychology Conference Room, 419 Brackett Hall.

We will not meet this week.

Our first meeting will be next Friday, 8/27.

For a list of scheduled talks for Fall 2010, please click the schedule of talks and brown bags.

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