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Cartee: The Effects of Reminder Distinctiveness and Anticipatory Interval on Prospective Memory

Thesis proposal

ABSTRACT: Prospective memory (PM) failures (or failures to remember a future intention) can result in a wide range of negative consequences. The use of reminders has been shown to improve the rate of PM successes. The current study aims to examine the effectiveness of reminders based on their type (text or picture) and their timing. We hypothesize that successful PM performance will be maintained over longer anticipatory intervals when paired with picture reminders rather than with simple text reminders because of their inherent distinctiveness. Prior research has shown increased memory for PM intentions when distinctiveness was high.

Committee: Rich Pak (chair), Patrick Rosopa, Paul Merritt
Wednesday, November 20th at 12:30pm in Brackett 414.

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Stephanie Whetsel Borzendowski’s dissertation proposal

Stephanie Whetsel Borzendowski’s dissertation proposal is scheduled for Tuesday, November 26 at 9:00 am in Brackett 419.

Encouraging the Appropriate Use of High Beam Headlamps: An Application of the TPB

Drivers typically underuse their high beam headlamps at night even under ideal conditions (i.e., no leading, following, or oncoming vehicles). One explanation for this is a lack of knowledge regarding both the magnitude of visibility problems at night and the benefits that high beams provide. The purpose of the present study is to design and evaluate an educational intervention that is based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) that targets a more appropriate reliance on high beams. The TPB provides a framework for understanding how interventions may lead to changes in intentions and/or behavior. Study 1 will identify salient beliefs about high beams and determine the factor(s) that best predict intentions to use high beams. This information will inform the design of the intervention that will be evaluated in Study 2. Half of the participants who receive the intervention in Study 2 will form implementation intentions about the conditions under which they plan to use their high beams; it is expected that these participants will report using their high beams more often. I hypothesize that the participants who receive the intervention, particularly those who form implementation intentions, will report using their high beams more often, will be observed using their high beams more often during a short on-road drive, and have greater knowledge of the visibility benefits provided by high beams.

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No HFDG this week

9-27-13

Due to the HFES annual meeting, there will be no HFDG this week.

Thank you

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Amelia Kinsella thesis proposal 9/24

I have scheduled my thesis proposal for Tuesday, September 24 at 9:00 am in Brackett 419.

The Effect of Frequency and Amplitude of Latency on Simulator Sickness in a Helmet Mounted Display

The purpose of the current experiment is to further examine the relationship between frequency of latency and amplitude of latency in a helmet mounted display (HMD), and simulator sickness. Motion sickness has been studied for decades in a variety of vehicles including ships, planes, trains and automobiles (Money, 1972). More recently virtual environments, including those utilizing an HMD have been shown to generate significant sickness, often termed simulator sickness (Kennedy, et al., 1993). Many studies have linked system latency to simulator sickness and recent research has found that latency is not a constant; but rather it varies systematically over time due to sensor errors and clock asynchronization (Wu, Dong, & Hoover, 2011). One hundred twenty participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of four conditions. Collected data will be analyzed using analysis of variance. Main effects of both frequency and amplitude of latency are expected, as well as an interaction between frequency and amplitude of latency. It is expected that sickness symptoms will increase for participants experiencing .2 Hz frequency of latency condition and the varying amplitude condition.
Chair: Eric Muth
Committee: Adam Hoover, Chris Pagano

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Phil Jasper thesis proposal 9/23

Time: Monday, September 23rd at 11:00am in 419 Brackett

Title: Using the Bite Counter to Overcome Environmental Cues that Lead to over Eating

Abstract: According to a recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, overweight and obesity have reached epidemic levels in the United States. There are many treatments for overweight and obesity, the most popular being behavioral interventions. Self-monitoring is one of the most important factors of successful behavioral interventions. The Bite Counter is a new tool for weight loss that aids in the self-monitoring process. The purpose of the current study is to determine if bite count feedback and a given instruction can overcome a known environmental cue of serving container size. That is, if an individual is instructed on the maximum number of bites to take, and given feedback on the numbers of bites taken, will they use this information to overcome their tendency to eat more food when the food is dispensed from a larger container? Data will be collected from 80 participants eating a meal of macaroni and cheese in a laboratory setting. In a 2 X 2 design, the participants will be assigned to one of four conditions: instruction given and small serving container, instruction given and large serving container, instruction not given and small serving container, or instruction not given and large serving container. Grams consumed will be measured post meal as the main dependent variable. It is hypothesized that: participants in the instruction condition will consume equal grams of macaroni and cheese, participants in the instruction not given condition will consume more grams of macaroni and cheese if serving from the larger container, and there will be an interaction between the instruction variable and serving container size variable. Specifically, serving container size will not affect intake amount in the instruction given condition, however those with the larger serving containers will consume more food in the instruction not given condition.

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Bliss Altenhoff – Live at HFDG – Sept 20th

September 20th

Who: Bliss Altenhoff
Where: Brackett 419 at 2.30p
What: Bliss will be discussing his past internship experiences

Bliss will be speaking about her internship at Premier in Charlotte, NC. As a User Experience Research Intern, her projects focused on conducting formative usability studies for two developing Premier products: a social business platform and a product to summarize high level savings opportunities for Premier-member hospitals.

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Drew Link – Live at HFDG – Sept 13th

September 13th

Who: Drew Link
Where: Brackett 419 at 2.30p
What: Drew Link will be discussing his past internship experiences -

Drew Link will talk about his experience and impressions of working in a company that makes healthcare devices in the summer 2012 and working with a research and design team that makes productivity software during summer 2013. He will talk about his involvement with the various projects, the differences of working in the two internships, and will have an open Q&A session to address any questions related to the process of conducting work at an internship.

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HFDG on 9/6 and 9/13

The HFDG on Friday 9/6 will be Bliss Altenhoff talking about her internship this summer.

The HFDG on Friday 9/13 will be Drew Link talking about his internship this summer.

HFDG will be from 2:30-3:30 PM on Fridays in Room 419 Brackett.

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No HFDG on August 30

Due to a lack of volunteers, there will be no HFDG on Friday August 30.
Contact Lee Gugerty if you want to give an HFDG talk after this.

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Mike Wilson thesis proposal

Monday, 9 September, 1:15 p.m. in Brackett 419.

Assessing the Bite Counter as a Weight Loss Tool

Obesity is a growing health concern throughout the world. Health risks associated with obesity such as diabetes and heart disease result in obesity costing us over $170 million annually. Self-monitoring of Energy Intake (EI) is a critical element of a successful weight loss plan; however current methods to monitor EI are cumbersome and prone to under reporting. The present study seeks to assess the effectiveness of a newly developed tool, the Bite Counter as a tool to assist motivated individuals to effectively monitor their EI and adjust their eating to achieve a targeted weekly weight loss goal. Data will be collected from 40 participants (20 control) in a study where Bite Counter feedback was used to titrate daily bite count goals in order to meet a 1 to 2 pound per week weight loss goal measured against the control group which will only be given weight loss literature. Halfway through the study, Bite Counters will be introduced into the control group to determine if the results from the initial Bite Counter group could be replicated.

Chair: Eric Muth Committee Members: Adam Hoover, Patrick Rosopa

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