Archive | human factors RSS feed for this section

HFDG: Is genetics the key?? … Individual differences in the design of interfaces and training programs

Is genetics the key?? … Individual differences in the design of interfaces and training programs
Dr. Ericka Rovira

Place: 419 Brackett Hall
Time: 1:00-2:00 pm Friday, March 28

(note, this will be a teleconferenced presentation)

Abstract: Human performance may be adversely affected when operators interact with highly reliable but imperfect systems. To date, models of human automation interaction emphasize how much authority the human or the machine should have at different decision making stages. Of particular interest is how human automation interactions are affected when the automated support tool is imperfect. The current research addresses types of human automation interaction mechanisms that may reduce performance decrements associated with imperfect automation. Results investigating contextual automation and automation etiquette will be presented. Additionally, optimizing human performance often requires assessment at the individual level because it provides an understanding of how individual variability contributes to operational performance. Molecular methods have been used to examine the genetic basis of basic cognitive function (Greenwood & Parasuraman, 2003; Posner et al., 2007). Individual differences in situation awareness and decision making in operational environments likely involve variation in cognitive processes of visual attention, working memory, and spatial attention. Research examining the utility and viability of using the allelic association method as a neuroergonomics approach that examines brain function in relation to operational tasks will be presented. This will pave the way for further theoretical progress in learning about the basis of individual differences in cognition and in human factors applications for training and interface design.

Dr. Ericka Rovira. She is an Associate Professor in the Engineering Psychology program at the United States Military Academy in West Point, NY. Dr. Rovira received a B.S. in Engineering Psychology and Biomedical Engineering from Tufts University, Medford, MA (2000) and a Ph. D. in Applied Experimental Psychology from The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (2006), under the direction of Dr. Raja Parasuraman. Also, she is currently the president-elect of APA Division 21 (Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology).

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Nathan Klein dissertation defense

Nathan Klein
Dissertation Defense
Understanding and Improving Pedagogical Aspects of a General Education Eportfolio
Chair: Benjamin Stephens
Committee: Lee Gugerty, Fred Switzer, and Joel Greenstein
Monday, March 24, 2014 at 12:30pm Brackett 214

The goal of this research was to examine general education eportfolio components that may help improve student learning outcomes. A general education eportfolio is essentially a website created by a student, who selects, links, and reflects upon artifacts they have created in order to demonstrate their competency in the various domains of higher education, e.g. social science, mathematics, and natural science. This dissertation research combined and extended previous research by Klein et al. (2011) into two studies. The first study employed a factorial design manipulating the type of reflective activity required for an eportfolio and the type of eportfolio support provided. The second study manipulated the number of artifacts used during reflection. The main outcome variables were student competency, metacognitive accuracy, and subjective experiences. Support, reflective activity, and an additional artifact were each expected to improve the outcome measures. Support and activity were also expected to produce a synergistic interactive effect. Reflective activity only had a marginal impact on competency, whereas eportfolio support was found to cause significant improvements in all of the outcome measures. There was a trend for a stronger effect of mentoring in eportfolios with rationale activities for social science competency. The second experiment did not detect any differences in outcomes resulting from using two artifacts compared to using one. This research informs educators of best practices in eportfolio program design at the general education level for improving learning outcomes in college students.

Keywords: eportfolio, learning, metacognition, reflection, support, general education

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Brock Bass Thesis defense 12/16

Faces as Ambient Displays: Assessing the Attention-Demanding Characteristics of Facial Expressions

Thesis Defense

Dr. Richard Pak (Advisor), Dr. Leo Gugerty, Dr. Christopher Pagano

Ambient displays are used to provide information to users in a non-distracting manner. The purpose of this research was to examine the efficacy of facial expressions as a method of conveying information to users in an unobtrusive way. Facial expression recognition requires very little if any conscious attention from the user, which makes it an excellent candidate for the ambient presentation of information. Specifically, the current study quantified the amount of attention required to decode and recognize various facial expressions. The current study assessed the attention-demanding characteristics of facial expressions using the dual-task experiment paradigm. Results from the experiment suggest that Chernoff facial expressions are decoded with the most accuracy when happy facial expressions are used. There was also an age-effect on decoding accuracy; indicating younger adults had higher facial expression decoding performance compared to older adults. The observed decoding advantages for happy facial expressions and younger adults in the single-task were maintained in the dual-task. The dual-task paradigm revealed that the decoding of Chernoff facial expressions required more attention (i.e., longer response times and more face misses) than hypothesized, and did not evoke attention-free decoding. Chernoff facial expressions do not appear to be good ambient displays due to their attention-demanding nature.

1 pm, Monday December 16th, 419 Brackett

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Drew Link Live at HFDG – 11/22/13

This week at HFDG

Who: Drew Link
Where: Brackett 419, this Friday at 2.30p
What: Dissertation plan and discussion

From Lee’s lab, Drew will be talking about research leading up to his current proposal
for a dissertation topic. The general research is on adaptive decision making in healthcare from a patient perspective. He is interested in studying variables that deal with how patients gather information regarding health topics online and how conditions (either of the individual or environment) may affect their ability or willingness to adapt their strategies. Drew will be presenting several potential study designs and will discuss potential considerations for the study.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Cartee: The Effects of Reminder Distinctiveness and Anticipatory Interval on Prospective Memory

Thesis proposal

ABSTRACT: Prospective memory (PM) failures (or failures to remember a future intention) can result in a wide range of negative consequences. The use of reminders has been shown to improve the rate of PM successes. The current study aims to examine the effectiveness of reminders based on their type (text or picture) and their timing. We hypothesize that successful PM performance will be maintained over longer anticipatory intervals when paired with picture reminders rather than with simple text reminders because of their inherent distinctiveness. Prior research has shown increased memory for PM intentions when distinctiveness was high.

Committee: Rich Pak (chair), Patrick Rosopa, Paul Merritt
Wednesday, November 20th at 12:30pm in Brackett 414.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Stephanie Whetsel Borzendowski’s dissertation proposal

Stephanie Whetsel Borzendowski’s dissertation proposal is scheduled for Tuesday, November 26 at 9:00 am in Brackett 419.

Encouraging the Appropriate Use of High Beam Headlamps: An Application of the TPB

Drivers typically underuse their high beam headlamps at night even under ideal conditions (i.e., no leading, following, or oncoming vehicles). One explanation for this is a lack of knowledge regarding both the magnitude of visibility problems at night and the benefits that high beams provide. The purpose of the present study is to design and evaluate an educational intervention that is based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) that targets a more appropriate reliance on high beams. The TPB provides a framework for understanding how interventions may lead to changes in intentions and/or behavior. Study 1 will identify salient beliefs about high beams and determine the factor(s) that best predict intentions to use high beams. This information will inform the design of the intervention that will be evaluated in Study 2. Half of the participants who receive the intervention in Study 2 will form implementation intentions about the conditions under which they plan to use their high beams; it is expected that these participants will report using their high beams more often. I hypothesize that the participants who receive the intervention, particularly those who form implementation intentions, will report using their high beams more often, will be observed using their high beams more often during a short on-road drive, and have greater knowledge of the visibility benefits provided by high beams.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

No HFDG this week

9-27-13

Due to the HFES annual meeting, there will be no HFDG this week.

Thank you

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Amelia Kinsella thesis proposal 9/24

I have scheduled my thesis proposal for Tuesday, September 24 at 9:00 am in Brackett 419.

The Effect of Frequency and Amplitude of Latency on Simulator Sickness in a Helmet Mounted Display

The purpose of the current experiment is to further examine the relationship between frequency of latency and amplitude of latency in a helmet mounted display (HMD), and simulator sickness. Motion sickness has been studied for decades in a variety of vehicles including ships, planes, trains and automobiles (Money, 1972). More recently virtual environments, including those utilizing an HMD have been shown to generate significant sickness, often termed simulator sickness (Kennedy, et al., 1993). Many studies have linked system latency to simulator sickness and recent research has found that latency is not a constant; but rather it varies systematically over time due to sensor errors and clock asynchronization (Wu, Dong, & Hoover, 2011). One hundred twenty participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of four conditions. Collected data will be analyzed using analysis of variance. Main effects of both frequency and amplitude of latency are expected, as well as an interaction between frequency and amplitude of latency. It is expected that sickness symptoms will increase for participants experiencing .2 Hz frequency of latency condition and the varying amplitude condition.
Chair: Eric Muth
Committee: Adam Hoover, Chris Pagano

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Phil Jasper thesis proposal 9/23

Time: Monday, September 23rd at 11:00am in 419 Brackett

Title: Using the Bite Counter to Overcome Environmental Cues that Lead to over Eating

Abstract: According to a recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, overweight and obesity have reached epidemic levels in the United States. There are many treatments for overweight and obesity, the most popular being behavioral interventions. Self-monitoring is one of the most important factors of successful behavioral interventions. The Bite Counter is a new tool for weight loss that aids in the self-monitoring process. The purpose of the current study is to determine if bite count feedback and a given instruction can overcome a known environmental cue of serving container size. That is, if an individual is instructed on the maximum number of bites to take, and given feedback on the numbers of bites taken, will they use this information to overcome their tendency to eat more food when the food is dispensed from a larger container? Data will be collected from 80 participants eating a meal of macaroni and cheese in a laboratory setting. In a 2 X 2 design, the participants will be assigned to one of four conditions: instruction given and small serving container, instruction given and large serving container, instruction not given and small serving container, or instruction not given and large serving container. Grams consumed will be measured post meal as the main dependent variable. It is hypothesized that: participants in the instruction condition will consume equal grams of macaroni and cheese, participants in the instruction not given condition will consume more grams of macaroni and cheese if serving from the larger container, and there will be an interaction between the instruction variable and serving container size variable. Specifically, serving container size will not affect intake amount in the instruction given condition, however those with the larger serving containers will consume more food in the instruction not given condition.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Bliss Altenhoff – Live at HFDG – Sept 20th

September 20th

Who: Bliss Altenhoff
Where: Brackett 419 at 2.30p
What: Bliss will be discussing his past internship experiences

Bliss will be speaking about her internship at Premier in Charlotte, NC. As a User Experience Research Intern, her projects focused on conducting formative usability studies for two developing Premier products: a social business platform and a product to summarize high level savings opportunities for Premier-member hospitals.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story