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Schaffer: The mentoring burnout relationship and predictors of nurse mentoring behavior

Title: The mentoring burnout relationship and predictors of nurse mentoring behavior
Chair: Mary Anne Taylor
Committee: Cindy Pury, Patrick Rosopa, Tom Britt

Date: Monday March 25th
Time: 2:30 pm
Location: Brackett 419

Abstract:
Employee burnout can be costly for organizations as well as employees as it contributes to turnover intentions, lost productivity and negative health outcomes (Aiken & Paice, 2003; Maslach & Leiter, 2008; Shaufeli & Bakker, 2004). The nursing profession appears to be particularly influenced by this stress-related phenomenon and is the targeted population in the current study (Shaufeli & Enzman, 1998). Using the Job Demands-Resources model, mentoring was examined as a factor that may impact burnout among experienced nurses. While positive mentoring experiences could serve as a resource that buffers against burnout, negative mentoring experiences may be a job demand that contribute to nurse burnout. Results of path analysis did not support these hypotheses, however, several moderators of the mentoring burnout relationship were identified. Predictors of actual nurse mentoring behavior, rather than stated willingness to serve as a mentor, was also examined. High workload and fixed shifts were associated with a greater proclivity to mentor.

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McFadden: I Get By With A Little Help From My Friends: The Buffering Effects Of Unit Level Moderators On The Combat Exposure-Mental Health Relationship

I Get By With A Little Help From My Friends: The Buffering Effects Of Unit Level Moderators On The Combat Exposure-Mental Health Relationship

A Thesis Proposal Presentation by Anna McFadden

Wednesday, December 12th at 11:00am
Brackett 414

Committee: Dr. Thomas Britt (chair), Dr. Robert Sinclair, and Dr. Heidi Zinzow

Abstract: Combat exposure has been linked to various negative outcomes, both physical (e.g., severed limbs, decreased health behaviors, mild traumatic brain injury) and mental (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, anxiety, substance abuse). Additionally, the military is limited in the ways in which it can protect service members from experiencing negative outcomes of war. The present study will examine how the unit-level variables of perceived organizational support, job self-efficacy, and morale moderate the relationship between combat exposure and depression and anxiety within the framework of the Soldier Adaptation Model. Soldiers who have previously deployed to Iraq for 15 months were surveyed at two time points (4 months and 10 months following return from deployment), allowing a longitudinal design to be employed. The current study is expected to show that unit-level perceived organizational support, job self-efficacy, and morale will each significantly attenuate the positive, individual-level relationships between combat exposure and the negative mental health outcomes of depression and anxiety. If unit-level variables do influence the stressor-strain relationship, effective interventions can be developed to decrease the negative effects experienced by soldiers.

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Murphy: Social Media Use Among Employees: Influences of Organizational Climate, Job Involvement, and Organizational Commitment

Title: Social Media Use Among Employees: Influences of Organizational Climate, Job Involvement, and Organizational Commitment
Presented by: Hannah Murphy
Committee Chair: Cindy Pury
Committee: Drs. Mary Taylor, Patrick Rosopa, and Robin Kowalski
Details: Friday, December 7th at 8:15am in 419 Brackett

Abstract:
How are social networking sites, such as Facebook, affecting employees and their organizations? Social media provide a way of creating communities where employees can share their workplace experiences and insights. The literature suggests that the manner in which these communications occur is dependent on the organizational climate, specifically the organization’s values of knowledge sharing and social communications. Based on findings in the preliminary study, the main study of this thesis investigates how an employee’s levels of organizational commitment and job involvement influence their use of social media. Correlational analyses revealed that an employee’s levels of organizational commitment and job involvement are positively related to whether they use Facebook to talk about their jobs. The organizational climate of rule bending was positively related to work-related Facebook use. An employee’s perceptions of appropriateness of using Facebook moderated the relationship between organizational commitment and work-related Facebook postings, with significant simple slopes at high levels of organizational commitment. Finally, the main hypothesis, that organizational commitment and job involvement would interact in their prediction of Facebook use was only marginally significant, but had significant simple slopes at low, medium, and high levels of job involvement.

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CSIOP Speaker Series: Dr. Lisa Baranik

Dr. Lisa Baranik, assistant professor at East Carolina University, will present as part of CSIOP’s speaker series on Friday, November 16th at 11:30am in Brackett 419. Dr. Baranik will give a talk titled “Relationships at Work and Health”.

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CSIOP Speaker Series: Dr. Pam Levine

Dr. Pam Levine, Enterprise Business Development Manager at SHL, will present as part of CSIOP’s speaker series on Friday, October 19th at 11:30am in Brackett 419. Dr. Levine will talk about the variety of I-O roles at SHL, as well as lessons learned from talking to business leaders about I-O.

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Atkinson: What Do You Mean I Have a Bad Review: The Effects of Race on Perceptions of Performance Appraisal Fairness and Deviant Behaviors

Presented by: Theresa Atkinson

Title: What Do You Mean I Have a Bad Review: The Effects of Race on Perceptions of Performance Appraisal Fairness and Deviant Behaviors.

Committee chair: Dr. Patrick Rosopa
Committee: Dr. Mary Ann Taylor & Dr. D. Moore.
Time & date: Wednesday, October 24th at 12 noon in Backett 419.

Perceptions of unfair performance appraisals have been found to be associated with various negative organizational outcomes including increases in workplace deviant behaviors and decreases in organizational citizenship behaviors. A main goal of the present study is to examine the process through which perceptions of performance appraisals lead to different behavioral outcomes by using psychological contract breaches. Although much research has examined psychological contracts and perceptions of breach as a social exchange phenomenon, the present study will examine breaches within the framework of Affective Events Theory. In the workplace, minority employees often receive more negative performance appraisals compared to their non-minority counterparts; these differences in appraisals are often attributed to rater bias. Thus, differences between minority and non-minority employees in terms of perceptions of performance appraisals and psychological contract breaches will also be examined. In addition, although past research suggests that core self-evaluations (CSE) is a relatively stable construct, the present study will investigate whether differing levels of performance appraisal bias may serve to alter individuals’ CSE.

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CSIOP Speaker Series: Dr. Paul Rubenstein

Dr. Paul Rubenstein will present as part of CSIOP’s speaker series on Friday, September 21st. Dr. Rubenstein is President & CEO of Accelerant Research, and will be giving a talk titled “Online Qualitative Research Methods: The Game-Changing Impact of Social Media”. Please join us on Friday, September 21st at 11:30 in Brackett 419.

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Bob Sinclair publishes new book

Bob Sinclair and colleagues have published a new book. It is available on Amazon.

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New website to sign up for experiments

Attention undergraduate students, if you want to sign up for psychological experiments (either for fun or as a class requirement) please note that the website has changed.

Psychology research will now be scheduled through the Clemson Psychology Research System, replacing HPR. The new research signup website is http://clemsonpsych.sona-systems.com

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Williams: DOES PRACTICE MAKE PERFECT? EFFECTS OF FEEDBACK AND PRACTICE ON INTERVIEW PERFORMANCE

Kate Williams
DOES PRACTICE MAKE PERFECT? EFFECTS OF FEEDBACK AND PRACTICE ON INTERVIEW PERFORMANCE
Committee: Pat Raymark (Chair), Cindy Pury, Patrick Rosopa, Ben Stephens

Dissertation Defense
Monday, July 30, 9:00am
Brackett 419

This study examined the incremental effectiveness of interview practice and feedback on candidates’ interview performance. In addition, interviewee anxiety, impression management behaviors, and core self-evaluation were considered as intervening variables between the training manipulations and interview performance. In this experimental design, participants were assigned to one of three groups: the control group, the interview practice group, and the coaching group that received practice plus feedback from a counselor. Employer representatives evaluated subsequent interview performance within a final mock interview.

Although initial hypotheses predicting differential effects of interview training on interview performance ratings were not supported, relationships were discovered among remaining variables. As predicted, less anxious candidates performed more impression management behaviors, which in turn were related to higher interview ratings. Core-self evaluation, the composite variable including self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control and emotional stability, demonstrated a direct effect on interview performance, interview anxiety and impression management behaviors.

In sum, this study expands our knowledge of how anxiety, impression management behaviors, and core self-evaluation influence interview ratings.

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