Archive | proposal/defense RSS feed for this section

Schaeffer: Buffering effects of positive mentoring on mentor burnout: Generative concern and perceived organization support as moderators

Buffering effects of positive mentoring on mentor burnout: Generative concern and perceived organization support as moderators

A Master’s Thesis Defense by Meline Schaffer

Tuesday October 26th, 9:30 Brackett 419

Chair: Mary Anne Taylor

Committee: Tom Britt, Dewayne Moore

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Zajack: Multilevel Antecedents of Economic Stress

Title: Multilevel Antecedents of Economic Stress

Date: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at 12:30pm, 419 Brackett Hall

Abstract: Much of the study of economic stress focuses on outcomes. This study assessed the antecedents that precede employee perceptions of economic strain. A multilevel framework of economic antecedents was proposed. The framework included objective indicators of the macroeconomic context as well as individual-level objective and subjective economic antecedents. It was hypothesized that antecedents within each of these categories of economic stress can fall into one of two dimensions: employment- or finance-related. Indicators of the macroeconomic context were gathered from the American Community Survey (ACS). Over 2,000 union employees of a large U.S. Midwestern retail chain provided individual employee-level economic information and economic stress perceptions. A confirmatory factor analysis examined the fit of the hypothesized framework of economic antecedents. The subsequent individual-level economic antecedent factors were found to be predictive of individual economic stress perceptions.

Chair: Bob Sinclair
Committee: DeWayne Moore, Fred Switzer, James McCubbin

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Lindsay Long: Investigating the Usability of a Vibrotactile Torso Display for Improving Simulated Teleoperation Obstacle Avoidance

Lindsay Long will defend her thesis proposal on Tuesday, October 26 at 4:15 PM in the Psychology Conference Room, Room 419 Brackett. The abstract is below and a flyer is attached.

Abstract:

The goal of the proposed study is to determine the degree to which a vibrotactile torso belt can improve unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) teleoperation performance over visual displays. Previous literature on the ability of haptic feedback to augment visual displays indicates that obstacle avoidance information may be more meaningfully communicated via vibrotactile torso systems, though there is no empirical evidence to support this. Tactile torso systems deliver feedback more intuitively than visual and graphical displays but they have not been incorporated into UGV teleoperation displays to improve obstacle avoidance. Presenting this information so that operators could accurately detect the proximity from walls and obstructions could result in a significant reduction in errors, ultimately improving task performance and increasing the usability of teleoperation.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Lindsay E. Sears: Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles Among Nurses

Defense Title:  Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles Among Nurses

Committee:

Dr. Robert R. Sinclair, Committee Chair

Dr. Tom Britt

Dr. DeWayne Moore

Dr. Patrick Rosopa

Date: October 15, 2010

Time: 2pm

Location: Brackett 414

Abstract:

Occupational turnover is a costly problem afflicting much of the nursing
industry, and occupational commitment is a strong predictor of withdrawal
from one’s profession. Traditional organizational research examines most
commitment-behavior relationships from a variable-centered perspective,
focusing on the relationships between constructs. The present study adopts a
configural, or person-centered approach aimed at identifying and describing
clusters of individuals who share a similar set of occupational commitment
mindsets. The present study extends current literature by a) investigating
the existence of several occupational commitment profiles and describing
their characteristics; b) examining situational and demographic predictors
of profile membership; and c) testing differences in occupational withdrawal
intentions across the occupational commitment profiles. I examined these
questions longitudinally using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) in an archival
data set of Registered Nurses from different organizations in the
Northwestern United States. Five distinct profiles of occupational
commitment among nurses emerged – free agent, allied, complacent, attached,
and devoted – each differing with respect to their predictors, outcomes, and
degree of stability over time. While there were few demographic differences
across profiles, the frequency of successes, supports, and demands on the
job appear to play an important role in the development of occupational
commitment mindsets. Profiles were also characterized by their varying
effects on withdrawal from the occupation. The findings supplemented results
gleaned from more traditional hierarchical regression techniques. Additional
implications and future directions for research are discussed.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Reeve Goodenough: The Geometric Field of View and Speed Perception in a Driving Simulator

Reeve Goodenough will defend his Masters Thesis on Friday September 3rd at 11:15am in Brackett 419

All are welcome to attend.

The title of his thesis is: The Geometric Field of View and Speed Perception in a Driving Simulator

Abstract:

Particularly in the health and rehabilitation sector where cost and space are constraints, practitioners are using smaller driving simulators.  Because these small-footprint driving simulators have a limited projected field of view (PFOV) it is desirable to extend the virtual or geometric field of view (GFOV) beyond that natively afforded by the PFOV.   Changing the PFOV/GFOV ratio has been shown to alter perceived speed.  In order for driving simulation to produce realistic experiences, drivers’ perception of speed should correspond with real world experiences.  The purpose of the current research was to better understand the relationship between speed perception and the GFOV/PFOV ratio in a way that would be useful to simulation practitioners using a small-footprint driving simulator.  Participants performed a speed matching task using different six GFOV conditions while the PFOV was held constant.  Three target speeds were presented in appropriate simulated environments: 25mph in a residential area, 45mph in a commercial area, and 65mph on a freeway.  Perceived speed was found to increase with larger GFOVs.  However, no GFOV tested produced accurate speed perception; on average, all participants underestimated their speeds using all GFOVs.  A regression was used to estimate at which GFOV error in speed production would approach zero.  Subjective data collected regarding participant strategy, perceived accuracy, and their awareness of different GFOV conditions are also discussed.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Gary Giumetti: Applicant self-selection during the hiring process: Developing and testing a model of applicant withdrawal…

Title: Applicant self-selection during the hiring process: Developing and testing a model of applicant withdrawal.

Date/Location: Monday, August 23rd, 2010 @ 11:00 AM, Brackett 419.

Abstract: The purpose of the current study is to develop a model of applicant withdrawal from the selection process and test components of this model with an applied sample. In the paper that follows, several theoretical frameworks are reviewed which provide guidance for the current study. Predictors of withdrawal are identified based on prior research and theory and hypotheses and research propositions are offered. Specifically, it is proposed that selection process features, applicant perceptions, employment background characteristics, individual differences, and outsider influence will play an important role in predicting applicant withdrawal intentions and actual withdrawal behavior. The proposed study will involve data collected from applicants to a production position at a large southeastern manufacturing company. Data will be analyzed using regression, including logistic, mediated, and moderated regression analyses.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Eric McKibben: The Relationship between Mood, Emotional Labor, Ego Depletion, and Customer Outcomes over Time

A Dissertation Defense
Eric S. McKibben
June 24, 2010
Brackett 419
1:00pm

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Rachel Rosenberg: The Effects of Headlight Intensity and Clothing Contrast on Pedestrians’…

Rachel Rosenberg will be defending her thesis “The Effects of Headlight Intensity and Clothing Contrast on Pedestrians’ Own Estimated Recognition Distances at Night” on Thursday 5/27 @ 12:30, Brackett 419.

All are welcome to attend.

Title: The Effects of Headlight Intensity and Clothing Contrast on Pedestrians’ Own Estimated Recognition Distances at Night

Abstract: Inadequate pedestrian detection is a crucial contributing factor in fatal nighttime collisions involving pedestrians. Pedestrians typically overestimate how recognizable they are to oncoming drivers and little is known about what affects pedestrians’ estimates of how recognizable they think they are. This study explored the extent to which pedestrians believed their conspicuity was affected by headlight intensity and clothing reflectance. Participants in four clothing conditions and in four different levels of headlight intensity walked to and from a parked vehicle until they felt recognizable to the driver. Estimated recognition distances did not change with variations in headlight intensity, suggesting that pedestrians do not use headlight illumination when judging their own conspicuity. Participants estimated shorter recognition distances when in Black clothing compared to more reflective clothing. These findings indicate a need to educate pedestrians about night visibility issues.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Alex Walker: Predicting team workload and performance using team autonomic activity

Alex Walker will be defending his dissertation “PREDICTING TEAM WORKLOAD AND PERFORMANCE USING TEAM AUTONOMIC ACTIVITY” on Thursday May 27th at 10 am in Brackett Room 419.

All are welcome to attend.

Abstract
The development of a team measure of autonomic activity has a wide variety of applications.  During team training, an index of team autonomic activity could potentially have added value for real-time feedback, team selection and performance evaluation.  The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between autonomic activity measures, workload, and performance, on both an individual and team level.  Specifically, this study sought to determine whether changes in workload could be detected in measures of autonomic activity and whether changes in the autonomic measures related to changes in performance.   34 teams of two (35 males, 33 females) completed a processing plant simulation during 4 varying levels of individual and team difficulty.  Sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity was measured throughout the task using an electrocardiogram (ECG) and an impedance cardiogram (ICG), in addition to the NASA-TLX.  SNS and PNS measures were combined to produce a team autonomic activity measure that was used to predict team workload and performance. Results showed that workload and performance varied across the task difficulty levels with higher difficulty producing higher workload and worse performance.  Regressions conducted predicting team performance from team autonomic activity showed that team autonomic activity accounted for 10% of the variance in team performance scores. Further exploratory analyses showed interesting relations between autonomic activity and performance when examining the task difficulty levels separately. These analyses discovered that during the mixed individual difficulty levels, one team member’s physiology was consistently correlated with the other team member’s performance.   In conclusion, the current study showed that team performance can be predicted from team autonomic activity, and that individual team member physiology has the potential to provide an index of other team related behaviors.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story

Nicole Fink: Prospective Memory in the Nursing Environment: Effects of Type of Prospective…

Nicole Fink will defend her thesis on Thursday, May 27th at 3:00pm in Brackett 419.

All are welcome to attend.

Thesis title: Prospective Memory in the Nursing Environment: Effects of Type of Prospective Task and Prospective Load

Abstract: The nursing environment is replete with event-based and time-based prospective memory (PM) tasks (i.e. high prospective load). However, the effects of time-based prospective load, prospective load in naturalistic settings, and prospective load with unique retrospective components for each PM task remains unknown. To address this gap, the current study used a mockup patient room setting to examine the effects of PM type (event-based or time based) and PM load (1 vs. 4 tasks with unique prospective and retrospective components) on ongoing task and PM task performance. Registered nurses completed an ongoing documentation task while also remembering to perform 1 or 4 PM nursing tasks at a certain time (time-based) or certain patient name (event-based). Results indicated that having an event-based intention decreased performance on the prospective component of the PM task and slowed performance on the ongoing task. Having a time-based intention in the one load condition positively affected timeliness of performing PM task and number of records completed. Performance on the retrospective components of the PM task was equal across groups, but post retrospective recall of tasks was worse in the high prospective load conditions.

Similar Posts (auto-generated):

Read full story