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Lindsay Sears: Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles among Nurses

  • Date/Location: Wednesday, May 19th, 9:00AM, Brackett 419
  • Title: Predictors and Outcomes of Occupational Commitment Profiles among Nurses
  • Committee: Bob Sinclair, Tom Britt, DeWayne Moore, Patrick Rosopa

Abstract:

Occupational turnover is a costly problem afflicting much of the nursing industry, and occupational commitment is a strong predictor of withdrawal from one’s profession. Traditional organizational research examines most commitment-behavior relationships from a variable-centered perspective, focusing on the relationships between constructs. The present study adopts a configural, or person-centered approach aimed at identifying and describing clusters of individuals who share a similar occupational commitment mindsets. The current paper focuses on the predictors of profile membership as well as differences in withdrawal from the nursing profession across profiles. The present study extends current literature by a) proposing and confirming the existence of several theory-based occupational commitment profiles and describing member characteristics within each profile; b) examining situational and personal predictors of profile membership; and c) investigating differences in occupational withdrawal intentions across the occupational commitment profiles. I propose to examine these questions longitudinally using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA; or latent mixture modeling) in an archival data set of Registered Nurses from different organizations in the Northwestern United States. The findings from this study are expected to provide support for configural approaches to commitment research and guide future research aimed at resolving the nursing shortage.

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Margaux Price: Complex Decision Support for Older Adults: Effects of Information Visualization…

Margaux Price will defend her thesis proposal on Friday, May 14th at 9:00am in Brackett 419.

All are welcome to attend.

Thesis title: Complex Decision Support for Older Adults:  Effects of Information Visualization on Decision Performance

Abstract: Older adults are faced with complex decision tasks that impose high working memory demands. A representative task is choosing a prescription drug plan from a multitude of options that must be evaluated along many factors. The combined effect of the quantity of complex information, and reduced working memory capacity puts older adults at a disadvantage. However, research with younger adults suggests that the working memory burden of decision tasks can be reduced using well-designed, graphical decision aids (i.e., environmental supports). The current study examines the use of environmental supports to support complex decision-making for older adults. Two experiments are proposed; experiment 1 will assess information visualizations that reduce the working memory demands of the task. The second experiment will validate the efficacy of the information visualization in an older adult group. Findings from this study will be used to make recommendations for visualizations as complex decision support systems.

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Elizabeth Conde-Evans: “Who’s the boss? The Gender Stereotypes on Perceptions of Leaders…

“Who’s the boss? The Gender Stereotypes on Perceptions of Leaders and the Likelihood of Engaging in Organizational Citizenship Behaviors” by Elizabeth Conde-Evans.

Friday, April 30, 2010
11:30 AM
Brackett 419

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Stacy A. Balk: The Accuracy of Observers’ Estimates of the Effect of Glare on Nighttime Vision…

“The Accuracy of Observers’ Estimates of the Effect of Glare on Nighttime Vision: Do We Exaggerate the Disabling Effects of Glare? ” by Stacy A. Balk.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010
8:45 AM
Cooper Library – Brown Room (conference room to the right of main lobby)

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Joshua A. Gomer: Spatial Perception and Robot Operation…

“Spatial Perception and Robot Operation: The Relationship Between Visual Spatial Ability and Performance in Direct Line of Sight and Teleoperation ” by Joshua A. Gomer.

Monday, April 12, 2010
2:30 PM
Brackett 419

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Stephanie R. Fishel-Brown: The Relationship Between Energy Balance Understanding…

“The Relationship Between Energy Balance Understanding and Measures of Wellness” by Stephanie R. Fishel-Brown.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010
3:30 PM
Brackett 419

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Christie Kelley: Perceived Organizational Support (POS) as a Predictor of Stigma…

A Master’s Thesis Defense by Christie Kelley
March 26, 2010
4:00 pm, Brackett 419

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Phillip Lipka: Sexual Minorities in the Workplace…

A Dissertation Defense
By Phillip Lipka
Friday, March 26th at 11 AM
419 Brackett Hall

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Rachel Rosenberg: The Effects of Headlight Intensity and Clothing Contrast on Pedestrian’s Estimates…

“The Effects of Headlight Intensity and Clothing Contrast on Pedestrian’s Estimates of their own Visibility at Night” by Rachel Rosenberg.

Thursday, January 28, 2010
9:00 AM
Brackett 419

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Matt Crisler: Are Distracted Drivers Aware that they are Distracted…

  • Thursday, February 4, 2010
  • 11:00 AM
  • Brackett 414

Are Distracted Drivers Aware that they are Distracted? Exploring Awareness, Self-regulation, and Performance in Drivers Performing Secondary Tasks

Research has shown that driving while talking on a mobile telephone is likely to cause
drivers’ to fail to see relevant events. However, distraction has been shown to have little
effect on lane-keeping ability. This pattern is similar to research on driving performance
at night suggesting that some problems associated with distraction may parallel those of
night driving.
The current investigation seeks to investigate whether drivers identify and react to their
own performance decrements while distracted and whether they notice differences in
lane-keeping versus identification performance. It is hypothesized that drivers will
expect robust driving performance while distracted and will not report differences in the
effect of distraction on lane-keeping ability and visual recognition ability.

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