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Psychology Department Undergraduate Research Support Awards

Do you need financial support for your psychology research?

Thanks to generous donations from Psychology Alumni Keith May and others, the Psychology department is now offering Research Support Awards to enhance the research activities of our undergraduate majors.

Therefore, if you are a psychology major in need of financial help in

a) purchasing experimental materials,
b) covering travel expenses related to presenting research at professional conferences, or
c) any other research related expense,

just submit a one-page description of your request to the Psychology department chair (Patrick Raymark, praymar@clemson.edu).

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Dr. Paul Merritt met with Senator Tim Scott to urge funding for Graduate Psychology Education

Dr. Paul Merritt meeting with Senator Tim Scott on behalf of APA to urge funding for the Graduate Psychology Education program


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Robert Sinclair named Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Bob Sinclair, professor of psychology was named Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Society Fellows are distinguished industrial and organizational psychologists who have made an unusual and outstanding contribution to the field. Sinclair was recognized for his scholarly contributions to occupational health psychology.

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Robert Sinclair receives the Graduate Student Excellence in Mentoring Award

Psychology professor Robert Sinclair was also recognized with the Graduate Student Excellence in Mentoring Award, which recognizes a faculty or staff member who mentors or advises graduate students. The goal of the award is to show graduate students’ appreciation for the faculty and staff who help students navigate the rigors of graduate school.

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Eric Muth Interviewed by Wall Street Journal

Researchers find that the optimal number of bites a day for weight loss and health is 100 bites a day, and new products will soon help people chew more. WSJ’s Sumathi Reddy and Clemson University psychology professor Eric Muth join Lunch Break with Sara Murray.

See the interview here.

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Leidheiser: The Effects of Age and Working Memory Demands on Automation-Induced Complacency

Student name: Will Leidheiser
Title of Thesis: The Effects of Age and Working Memory Demands on Automation-Induced Complacency
Type: Thesis Proposal
Thesis Advisor: Dr. Richard Pak
Thesis Committee Members: Dr. Richard Pak, Dr. Patrick Rosopa, and Dr. Kelly Caine
Date, Time, and Location: Monday, August 4th at 10:00 a.m., Brackett 419

Abstract:
Complacency refers to a type of automation use expressed as insufficient monitoring and verification of automated functions. Previous studies have attempted to identify the age-related factors that influence complacency during interaction with automation. However, little is known about the role of age-related differences in working memory capacity and its connection to complacent behaviors. The current study aims to examine whether working memory demand of an automated task and age-related differences in cognitive ability influence complacency. Higher degrees of automation (DOA) have been shown to reduce cognitive workload and may be used to manipulate working memory demand of a task. Thus, we hypothesize that a lower DOA (i.e. information acquisition stage with lower level) will demand more working memory than a higher DOA (i.e. decision selection stage with higher level) and that a lower DOA will result in a greater difference in complacency between age groups than a higher DOA.

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Hartman: Investigation of Distance to Break Using Compliant Nonlinear and Linear Materials in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task

Time and Location: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 at 10:30AM, Brackett 419

Committee Members: Dr. Chris Pagano (Chair), Dr. Timothy Burg, Dr. Ben Stephens

Title: Investigation of Distance to Break Using Compliant Nonlinear and Linear Materials in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task

Abstract:Accurate interpretation of the mediated haptic information in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is critical for applying appropriate force magnitudes into soft tissue with the aim of minimizing tissue trauma.  Force perception in MIS is a dynamic process with surgeon’s administration of force into tissue revealing information about the remote surgical site which will further inform the surgeon for further haptic interaction. In previous research the relationship between applied force and material deformation rate was shown to provide biomechanical information specifying the distance remaining until the tissue would fail, which has been term distance-to-break (DTB).The current study furtherinvestigates whether observers are using DTB to stop before the failure point of the tissue or if they are stopping using another component such as increase in force. Findings replicated Long et al. (submitted) results that observers could reliably perceive DTB in simulated nonlinear biological tissues. The sensitivity for the DTB invariant is further supported by the poor performance of the additional linear profiles participants were tested on that lacked the DTB invariant.

 

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Morris: The Cold Driver: Driving Performance Under Thermal Stress

Title of Thesis: The Cold Driver: Driving Performance Under Thermal Stress

Type: Thesis Proposal

Thesis Advisor: Dr. June J. Pilcher

Thesis Committee Members: Dr. June Pilcher, Dr. Fred Switzer, Dr. Chris Pagano

Time and Location: Tuesday, April 29th at 1:30pm, Brackett 419

Abstract:
Exposure to cold environments can impact complex task performance and increase cognitive and physiological error in response to thermal stress. Critically, the task of driving a vehicle requires the use of calibrated mental and physical actions to be conducted safely without error. Few studies have examined the effects of cold stress on driving performance and none have explored the potential for advanced driver safety systems to detect error. Active vehicle safety systems which monitor dangerous driving behavior due to drowsiness have been research and developed, though technology associated with thermal stressed driving error is unexplored. The current study aims to examine the effects of cold stress by way of skin cooling on driving simulator performance, and evaluate vehicle behavior metrics for possible dangerous driving detection systems. Driving under cold stress is expected to result in systematic vehicle behavior and driving performance error which can be utilized for future safety system development.

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Jennings: The role of social support in seeking treatment and treatment retention in the military: Examining the function and source of support

The role of social support in seeking treatment and treatment retention in the military: Examining the function and source of support
Thesis Defense by Kristen Jennings
Friday, April 18th at 11:00 am
Brackett 414
Committee: Dr. Thomas Britt (chair), Dr. Bob Sinclair, Dr. Heidi Zinzow

Abstract:
Service members of the United States military occupy jobs that are unlike most in the exposure to exceptional stress and the potential for life-threatening and traumatic on-the-job experiences. Because of the nature of the job tasks and duties, many soldiers are vulnerable to developing mental health problems. Even more problematic, many soldiers experiencing mental health symptoms are not getting the treatment they need. The present study examined how social support can influence a soldier’s decision to engage in treatment and stay in treatment. More specifically, the study examined the unique influence of family and friends, fellow unit members, and leaders in the soldier’s decision to seek treatment, as well as different supportive behaviors from leaders that affect treatment seeking and retention. Using data from active duty soldiers surveyed at two time points, results indicated that support for treatment seeking is related to whether or not soldiers seek treatment through positively affecting their attitude toward treatment. Support from family members and friends was found to be most related to attitude and treatment decisions. These relationships were further moderated by functional impairment, where the effect of support on treatment seeking through attitude was strongest for those with problems causing low or moderate impairment. In terms of leader supportive behaviors, instrumental leader support was rated as the most influential to soldiers’ treatment decisions. Lastly, in terms of treatment retention, initial evidence was found that support from family members and spouses may influence whether or not soldiers drop out of treatment. Results from this study are intended to be informative for application in enhancing social support resources that are most effective for getting soldiers into treatment and increasing retention.

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HFES Student Chapter Guest Speaker: Dr. Anne McLaughlin

Anne McLaughlin will be speaking to us about Human factors in veterinary medicine at our third HFES Month event! Come hear this talk and enter your name in a drawing to win an HF/E prize. Snacks will be provided.

WHEN: April 18th at 1:00pm
WHERE: Brackett 419

RSVP HERE (RSVP by April 15th)

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