HFDG: Is genetics the key?? … Individual differences in the design of interfaces and training programs

Is genetics the key?? … Individual differences in the design of interfaces and training programs
Dr. Ericka Rovira

Place: 419 Brackett Hall
Time: 1:00-2:00 pm Friday, March 28

(note, this will be a teleconferenced presentation)

Abstract: Human performance may be adversely affected when operators interact with highly reliable but imperfect systems. To date, models of human automation interaction emphasize how much authority the human or the machine should have at different decision making stages. Of particular interest is how human automation interactions are affected when the automated support tool is imperfect. The current research addresses types of human automation interaction mechanisms that may reduce performance decrements associated with imperfect automation. Results investigating contextual automation and automation etiquette will be presented. Additionally, optimizing human performance often requires assessment at the individual level because it provides an understanding of how individual variability contributes to operational performance. Molecular methods have been used to examine the genetic basis of basic cognitive function (Greenwood & Parasuraman, 2003; Posner et al., 2007). Individual differences in situation awareness and decision making in operational environments likely involve variation in cognitive processes of visual attention, working memory, and spatial attention. Research examining the utility and viability of using the allelic association method as a neuroergonomics approach that examines brain function in relation to operational tasks will be presented. This will pave the way for further theoretical progress in learning about the basis of individual differences in cognition and in human factors applications for training and interface design.

Dr. Ericka Rovira. She is an Associate Professor in the Engineering Psychology program at the United States Military Academy in West Point, NY. Dr. Rovira received a B.S. in Engineering Psychology and Biomedical Engineering from Tufts University, Medford, MA (2000) and a Ph. D. in Applied Experimental Psychology from The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (2006), under the direction of Dr. Raja Parasuraman. Also, she is currently the president-elect of APA Division 21 (Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology).

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