Breeden: The Effects of Perspective, Humility, and Social Desirability on Perceptions of Accolade Courage in Male Student and Military Populations

Name: Chad Breeden, Thesis Proposal
Title: Call it Courage: The Effects of Perspective, Humility, and Social Desirability on Perceptions of Accolade Courage in Male Student and Military Populations
The Thesis Advisor: Dr. Cindy Pury
The Thesis Committee Members: Dr. Patrick Rosopa, Dr. Charles Starkey
When/Where: December 16, 2011, 12:15 pm, Brackett 419.

Abstract:
Courage – despite millennia of contemplation – is only now seeing efforts at empirical study and definition. Recent studies have attempted to break down the component parts of courage, but do not address why courage appears to only be bestowed on others and rarely to oneself. This paper examines the relationship between men’s own perceptions of and their assessment of courage, in order to better understand how individuals attribute courage to themselves and how they attribute it to others. It is proposed that men will rate themselves lower on courage than they will others, when asked to imagine themselves taking a specific action in a dangerous situation. Additionally, with an accolade conception of courage, this difference will be broken down through means of attributional theory, humility, social desirability, and military involvement.

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