Gillispie: The Effects of Health Benefit Use and Satisfaction on Commitment among Full and Part-time Employees

Thesis Defense: The Effects of Health Benefit Use and Satisfaction on
Commitment among Full and Part-time Employees

Presented by: Skye Gillispie

Committee: Bob Sinclair (chair), Patrick Rosopa, and Pat Raymark

Details: Friday, April 13th, 2012 at 11:00am in Brackett 414

Abstract:

Previous research on employee benefits has found that benefits are
related to various employee attitudes including job satisfaction,
turnover intentions, organizational commitment, perceived
organizational support, affective organizational commitment, and
continuance organizational commitment (Blau et al., 2001; Sinclair,
Leo, & Wright, 2005; Williams et al., 2002). The current study
examined how health benefit use and health benefit satisfaction
influence three types of commitment: affective organizational,
continuance organizational and union loyalty. To date, researchers
have never examined the differential effects of health benefits use in
full and part-time employees. Given that it is uncommon for part-time
employees to be offered benefits, part-time employees may view their
benefits as a way in which the organization or union demonstrates that
they care for their employees or members as individuals. Therefore, I
hypothesized that employee work status would moderate the relationship
between health benefit use and health benefit satisfaction on
affective organizational commitment and union loyalty, such that those
who use their benefits, are highly satisfied, and work part-time have
the highest commitment levels. Partial support was found for study
hypotheses. Results and implications of results are discussed.

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