Hartman: Investigation of Distance to Break Using Compliant Nonlinear and Linear Materials in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task

Time and Location: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 at 10:30AM, Brackett 419

Committee Members: Dr. Chris Pagano (Chair), Dr. Timothy Burg, Dr. Ben Stephens

Title: Investigation of Distance to Break Using Compliant Nonlinear and Linear Materials in a Simulated Minimally Invasive Surgery Task

Abstract:Accurate interpretation of the mediated haptic information in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is critical for applying appropriate force magnitudes into soft tissue with the aim of minimizing tissue trauma.  Force perception in MIS is a dynamic process with surgeon’s administration of force into tissue revealing information about the remote surgical site which will further inform the surgeon for further haptic interaction. In previous research the relationship between applied force and material deformation rate was shown to provide biomechanical information specifying the distance remaining until the tissue would fail, which has been term distance-to-break (DTB).The current study furtherinvestigates whether observers are using DTB to stop before the failure point of the tissue or if they are stopping using another component such as increase in force. Findings replicated Long et al. (submitted) results that observers could reliably perceive DTB in simulated nonlinear biological tissues. The sensitivity for the DTB invariant is further supported by the poor performance of the additional linear profiles participants were tested on that lacked the DTB invariant.

 

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