Kelley: Working 9 to 5, What a Way to Make a Livin’! An Investigation into the Relationship between Shift and Turnover

Name: Christie Kelley, Dissertation Proposal
Title: Working 9 to 5, What a Way to Make a Livin’! An Investigation into the Relationship between Shift and Turnover
The Thesis/Dissertation Advisor: Dr. Thomas W. Britt
The Thesis/Dissertation Committee Members: Dr. Robert R. Sinclair, Dr. DeWayne Moore, and Dr. Mary Anne Taylor
When/Where: December 6, 2011, 12:30 pm, Brackett 419.
Abstract:
The current study investigates burnout and engagement as mediators of the relationship between shift and turnover. Further, perceived organizational support (POS) and work schedule justice (WSJ) are hypothesized to moderate the relationship between shift and two outcomes: engagement and burnout. The Job Demands-Resource model is used as a framework for the current study (Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004). The Job Demands-Resource model suggests that job demands, in this case shift, lead to burnout. Working the night shift has previously been related to burnout (Folkard, Lombardi, & Tucker, 2005), which supports shift as a job demand. WSJ and POS are viewed as job resources, which lessen the effects of demands on burnout and engagement. If employees feel supported by their organization, and believe their schedule is fair, employees working the night shift should have less burnout and higher engagement than those lacking these important resources. POS and WSJ are expected to moderate the relationships between shift and both engagement and burnout, such that the negative impact of shift on the outcomes will be decreased when POS and WSJ are high. The current study uses a longitudinal sample of nurses to test the hypotheses with structural equation modeling.

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