Scisco: Determining sources of variance in bite count: An observational study of free-living humans

Determining sources of variance in bite count: An observational study of free-living humans A dissertation proposal by Jenna Scisco Wednesday, August 17th, 2011 9:00am in Brackett Hall 419

Committee:
Eric Muth, Chair
Tom Alley
Adam Hoover
Patrick Rosopa

Abstract:

The obesity epidemic is “undoubtedly attributable to dietary and behavioral causes” (Müller, Bosy-Westphal, & Krawczak, 2010, p. 612).The bite counter device has the potential to help individuals change their behaviors by enabling long-term self-monitoring of energy intake. The purpose of the proposed study is to examine predictors of number of bites taken during a meal by free-living humans.Participants will wear bite counters and record bite count during daily meals for two weeks. Participants will also record their daily dietary intake using automated, computer-based 24-hour recalls.Predictors of bite count will be explored at the meal-level and person-level using multilevel modeling. Meal-level predictors include kilocalories, energy density, meal duration, location, number of people present at the meal, and day of the week. Person-level predictors include gender and body weight. This study will be one of the first to provide long-term bite count data from free-living humans and will be an essential first step in determining sources of variance in bite count. The variables that emerge as significant predictors of bite count will provide guidance for behavioral interventions with the bite counter.

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