St. Pierre: The effects of system latency, frequency, and amplitude on simulator sickness in a helmet mounted display

Date: Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 11:30am in Brackett Hall 419..

Title: The effects of system latency, frequency, and amplitude on simulator sickness in a helmet mounted display.

Chair: Dr. Eric Muth

Committee: Dr. Richard Tyrrell, Dr. Chris Pagano, Dr. Adam Hoover

Abstract:
With the increase in technology, the use of virtual environments (VEs) like helmet mounted displays (HMDs) has increased in medicine, engineering, education, design, training, and entertainment (Stanney, Mourant, & Kennedy, 1998). Although there are benefits to HMD use, there are also serious drawbacks such as simulator sickness (SS). Previous studies have focused on factors such as added latency in the HMD display as the reason for the occurrence of SS, but there are conflicting findings in the literature. Recent research by Wu, Dong, and Hoover (2011) indicated that an orientation sensing error inherent in some systems causes a variability in latency. It is proposed that this variability in latency may be responsible for SS as opposed to added latency. The purpose of the proposed work is to examine the effect of variability in system latency, specifically variations in frequency and amplitude in an HMD on SS. A secondary purpose is to determine the relationship between changes in the visual system due to HMD use and the propensity of an individual to experience SS symptomology.

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