Stanyar: Quantitative Workload, Physical Activity, and Quality of Sleep: An Investigation of Nurses Working the Night Shift and 10 Hour or Longer Shifts

Quantitative Workload, Physical Activity, and Quality of Sleep: An Investigation of Nurses Working the Night Shift and 10 Hour or Longer Shifts
March 15th, 3:30-5pm, Room 419, Brackett Hall

Committee: Dr Sinclair; Chair, Dr Merritt, Dr McCubbin

Abstract
Approximately 30% to 40% of adults suffer from some form of insomnia in any given year. Insomnia-related productivity losses for organizations are estimated at $5 billion dollars annually. Long work weeks, shift work, and high workload have been linked to poor sleep quality. Currently, there is a gap in research on how physical activity affects quality of sleep among nurses who work long hours and nurses who work the night shift. Therefore two samples of nurses were examined; nurses who work 10 hour or longer shifts (N = 222) and nurses who work the night shift (N = 97). This study investigated the following; Hypotheses 1a and 1b predicted that quantitative workload would be negatively associated with nurses’ quality of sleep. Hypotheses 2a and 2b predicted that quantitative workload would be negatively associated with physical activity behaviors. Hypotheses 3a and 3b predicted that physical activity would be positively associated with nurses’ quality of sleep. Hypotheses 4a and 4b predicted that physical activity would mediate the relationship between quantitative workload and quality of sleep. Hypotheses 5a and 5b predicted that physical activity would moderate the relationship between quantitative workload and quality of sleep. Finally, Hypotheses 6a and 6b predicted that neuroticism would moderate the relationship between physical activity and quality of sleep. The results confirmed Hypotheses 1a, 1b, and 3a, but failed to support Hypotheses 2a, 2b, 3b, and Hypotheses 4ab-6ab. Theoretical and organizational implications are discussed.

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