Wallace: An Extension of Social Facilitation Theory to the Decision-Making Domain

Thursday, February 17
8:30-9:30
Brackett 419

An Extension of Social Facilitation Theory to the Decision-Making Domain

Social facilitation has traditionally been defined as the influence of the presence of others on an individual’s task performance.  Social presence has been shown to either facilitate or impair performance based on various moderating variables, including the more recent investigation of individual differences, but researchers have yet to extend social facilitation theory to the domain of decision-making.  This study proposes to evaluate the effects of social presence on individual and group decision-making, using the personality variables of extraversion, self-esteem, neuroticism, and anxiety as potential moderating variables of this effect.  It is hypothesized that affiliative individuals, marked by high extraversion and high self-esteem, will experience performance facilitation under social presence in a decision-making task.  Similarly, it is hypothesized that avoidant individuals, marked by high neuroticism, high anxiety, and low self-esteem, will experience performance impairment under social presence in a decision-making task.

Committee: Dr. Fred Switzer (Chair), Dr. Cindy Pury, Dr. Robin Kowalski

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