Wilson: ASSESSING THE BITE COUNTER AS A WEIGHT LOSS TOOL

ASSESSING THE BITE COUNTER AS A WEIGHT LOSS TOOL on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, in Brackett Hall, Room 419, at 1030 am.
ABSTRACT

Obesity is a growing health concern throughout the world. Health risks associated with obesity such as diabetes and heart disease result in obesity costing us over $170 million annually. Self-monitoring of Energy Intake (EI) is a critical element of a successful weight loss plan; however current methods to monitor EI are cumbersome and prone to under reporting. The primary purpose of the study was to develop and test an experimental diet protocol based on user feedback from the Bite Counter. A secondary purpose was to examine if this protocol would affect meaningful weight loss by device users. Data were collected from 30 participants (15 control) in a study where Bite Counter feedback was used to titrate daily bite count goals in order to meet a 1 to 2 pound per week weight loss goal measured against the control group which was only given weight loss literature. 77% of our participants were able to use the device to self-monitor a majority of the eating activities. Although weight loss was higher in the Bite Counter group, we determined that a diet protocol based solely on using the Bite Counter did not produce statistically significant weight loss over the ten-week study period. The Bite Counter was able to help the control group sustain their weight loss throughout the entire study period. The study determined that aggressive screening measures during study uptake is needed in order to ensure the recruitment of participants who are likely to complete future studies. User profile personas were developed to assist future researcher identify and classify users as successful or unsuccessful candidates for losing weight using the Bite Counter.

Committee Chair: Dr. Eric Muth
Committee Members: Dr. Adam Hoover and Dr. Patrick Rosopa

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