Asian Longhorned Beetle

Anoplophora glabripennis, the Asian longhorned beetle arrived in the United States via the wooden shipping crates used in transporting goods from Asia. Asian longhorned beetles have been reported around the Chicago and New York areas, feeding on maple trees, horsechestnuts, poplars, willows, elms, mulberries and black locusts. The loss of stands of trees to this pest species throughout the country could spell huge economic losses for the nursery and forest industries. Asian longhorned beetles can be transported to new regions and states through the movement of firewood, stumps, roots, branches and other infested tree debris.

Mature Asian longhorned beetles can range from one to one-and-a-half inches long, with four-inch long antennas. The beetles are characterized by black and white coloration. In Asia, the Asian longhorned beetle is called the starry beetle because of the irregular pattern of white spots on the beetle’s wing covers. The antennae of the beetles are also alternating black and white banded. Trees that are targeted by this pest species are typically destroyed from the inside-out as the Asian longhorned beetle feeds on the xylem and phloem, tissues that transport water and nutrients throughout the living tree. Mature beetles leave the trees they have been feeding on, making exit holes as big as a ballpoint pen, around late May through October. Symptoms of the beetle’s presence include sap oozing from the exit hole and sawdust on the lower tree branches.

Asian long-horned beetle photo   Asian long-horned beetle exit holes in maple wood

If you think you have found an Asian longhorned beetle, please contact DPI at invasives@clemson.edu or 864.646.2140.

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