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Role of Physicians

Physicians diagnose and care for people of all ages who are ill or have been injured. They take medical histories, perform physical examinations, conduct diagnostic tests, recommend and provide treatment, and advise patients on their overall health and well-being. While there are several different types of physicians, they can usually be divided into three broad categories:

  • Primary care physicians are the doctors patient usually visit most frequently. They treat a wide range of illnesses and regularly provide preventive care, and they also enjoy long-term relationships with their patients. Pediatricians, family practitioners and general internists are primary care physicians.
  • Surgeons perform operations to treat diseases and repair injuries.
  • Specialists have expertise related to specific diseases as well as body parts, organs, and systems. Cardiologists, Oncologists, Neurologists, and ophthalmologists are examples of specialists. The AAMC’s Careers in Medicine website contains information about various specialties in medicine.

Note: Information above taken directly from American Association of Medical Colleges.

Osteopathic medicine is a distinct form of medical practice in the United States.

Osteopathic medicine provides all of the benefits of modern medicine including prescription drugs, surgery, and the use of technology to diagnose disease and evaluate injury. It also offers the added benefit of hands-on diagnosis and treatment through a system of treatment known as osteopathic manipulative medicine. Osteopathic medicine emphasizes helping each person achieve a high level of wellness by focusing on health promotion and disease prevention.

Note: Information above taken directly from the American Assocation of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine.



Pursuit of Medicine at Clemson

Clemson University prepares students for application to a four-year Doctor of Allopathic Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree program.

Traditional Med Timeline

Pre-medicine is not a major. Therefore, you must choose a degree-granting major (and minor, if appropriate). Medical schools do not discriminate among the different disciplines from which you may choose, meaning that you can and should choose the curriculum that interests you most and excel. Be sure to accommodate prerequisite courses for your medical schools of interest.

What is considered competitive?

Admissions criteria vary by institution and should be verified individually. According to AMCAS data, a competitive applicant for admission to MD (allopathic) programs for the fall 2015 class had an average Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.7 and an average MCAT score of 31.4, as compared to the overall applicant pool, which had an average GPA of 3.55 and MCAT score of 28.3. According to AACOMAS data, a competitive applicant for admission to DO (osteopathic) programs for the fall 2015 class had an average Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.53 and an average MCAT score of 27.3, as compared to the overall applicant pool, which had an average GPA of 3.44 and MCAT score of 26.4.

Core Preparation Courses

Introductory Biology BIOL 1030+1050 & BIOL 1040+1060 or BIOL 1100 & BIOL 1110
Introductory Chemistry CH 1010 & CH 1020
Organic Chemistry CH 2230+2270 & CH 2240+2280
Biochemistry BCHM 3010 or 3050
Physics PHYS 1220+1240 & PHYS 2210+2230 or PHYS 2070+2090 & PHYS 2080+2100
Psychology PSYC 2010
Sociology SOC 2010

Additional Recommended Coursework

Anatomy and Physiology BIOL 2220 & 2230 or BIOL 3150 & 3160
Cell Biology BIOL 4610
Genetics GEN 3000 or GEN 3020
Microbiology MICR 3050
Note. Requirements vary by institution and should be verified individually.