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Undergraduate Handbook

Table of Contents

Academic Advising
Academic Forgiveness
Bachelor’s to Master’s Program
Canvas
Change of Major
Course Substitutions
Creative Inquiry
Credits to Be Earned at Another School
Curriculum
Curriculum Chart
ME Required Courses
ME Technical Electives
Non-ME Technical Electives
Former Students Returning
Minors
Registration
Scholarships
Student Organizations

 

Academic Advising

Academic advising is a partnership between you and your advisor that is based on open and frequent communication that requires a combination of self-knowledge; consideration of academic, personal and professional goals; and information about student resources, careers and university policies. Advisors do not “prescribe” answers for the student; rather, advisors prompt the student with questions and provide students with the information they need to explore their interests and avail themselves of all the resources Clemson University has to offer. While academic advising is a collaborative process, the responsibility for each student’s educational experience and success ultimately rests with the student.

The ME Student Services Office is located in Suite 102 Fluor Daniel Engineering Innovation Building. Advisors are available during posted office hours. Advisor contact information is listed below.

Spencer Davenport Julie Markus
102A Fluor Daniel 102B Fluor Daniel 102 E Fluor Daniel 102F Fluor Daniel
sdaven2@clemson.edu jwmarku@clemson.edu
846-656-3110

To meet with an advisor, please schedule an appointment via CU Navigate here: https://www.clemson.edu/academics/advising/cunavigate/guide/. Instructions for scheduling (and cancelling) an appointment with an advisor can be found here: https://www.clemson.edu/academics/advising/cunavigate/documents/student-scheduling-and-cancelling-appointments.pdf.

Students are responsible for preparing for advising appointments. If the student needs an advisor’s signature on a form, the student is responsible for printing and filling out the form prior to meeting with the advisor. Students who arrive at appointments unprepared may be asked to reschedule.

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Academic Forgiveness

The Academic Forgiveness Policy allows a student enrolled beginning Fall 2013 to eliminate from their GPA calculation up to three courses in which a D or F was earned. Students may not apply forgiveness to courses in which they earned a C or better, courses taken at another academic institution, or courses taken on a pass/no pass basis. Please read the official university academic policy before submitting a request for academic forgiveness: https://www.clemson.edu/registrar/student-menu/student-records/academic-forgiveness.html.

Students considering requesting academic forgiveness should be aware of the following implications:

  • Academic forgiveness may be applied only to courses taken at Clemson University. Course substitutions are not permitted.
  • Academic forgiveness may only be applied to courses in which the student has received a final grade of D or F. Academic forgiveness may not be applied to a course taken on a Pass/No Pass basis.
  • Forgiveness requests cannot be processed until a final grade is assigned. ME advisors will not sign academic forgiveness forms for a course that is still in progress.
  • Courses taken prior to fall semester 2003 may not be considered for academic forgiveness.
  • Students enrolled prior to Fall 2013 who applied academic redemption may must calculate the number of redemption hours they had remaining after the second summer session in 2013 to determine if they are eligible for academic forgiveness.
  • Students may not invoke academic forgiveness after they have graduated. After graduation, students may repeat coursework, but the original grade will not be removed from the student’s GPA calculation. Candidates for graduation must request academic forgiveness by the deadline to submit candidate grades.
  • The AFP may not be applied to any course in which the student was previously found in violation of the academic integrity policy.
  • If the course to which academic forgiveness is being applied is a degree requirement, it must be repeated satisfactorily at Clemson University in order for the student to graduate. If the course is not required it does not have to be repeated. Both grades will remain on the transcript, degree progress report, and other official documents, but the forgiven course will not be used in the calculation for hours or GPA. For financial aid purposes, courses repeated under this policy resulting in duplicate credit do not count for satisfactory academic progress.
  • Students receiving financial aid are responsible for understanding how academic forgiveness will affect their financial aid. Students should always consult with a financial aid advisor before submitting a forgiveness request.
  • Completion of an academic forgiveness request does not automatically grant academic forgiveness. Students will be notified via email of any DENIED request by the Office of Records and Registration.

Renewal for Clemson and state scholarships is based on your GPA and your earned credit hours. Academic Forgiveness can improve your GPA while reducing your credit hours, so you must be aware of all consequences before requesting that a grade be forgiven. Students receiving financial aid (including scholarships) should talk to a staff member in the Financial Aid Office before requesting forgiveness for a course to determine how forgiveness will impact their eligibility. To request academic forgiveness, students must fill out two forms:

  • College form: https://www.clemson.edu/registrar/documents/academic-forgiveness.pdf
  • ME form: http://www.clemson.edu/cecas/departments/me/academics/undergraduate/media/ME%20Request%20for%20Academic%20Forgiveness.pdf

Students should then make an appointment with an ME advisor and bring the completed forms to the appointment for approval. Students are responsible for delivering the signed forms to 104 Sikes Hall, and for reviewing their transcripts to verify the academic forgiveness has been applied. Students can expect the “FGF” or “FGD” grade to appear on their transcript about two weeks after the form is delivered to Sikes.

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Bachelor’s to Master’s Program (BS/MS)

The Bachelor’s to Master’s program allows ME undergraduate students to start work on a graduate degree before graduating with a bachelor’s degree. Students admitted to the BS/MS program may count up to 12 credit hours of 6000- and 8000-level courses to satisfy the requirements of both degrees. Students who are considering pursuing a graduate degree benefit from enrolling in the BS/MS program in that:

  • Time-to-degree for the MS program can reduced by a full semester. The non-thesis MS at Clemson requires a total of 33 credit hours. Students double-counting 12 credit hours as part of the BS/MS program can complete their MS within two semesters of completing their BS.
  • Potentially lower cost to the MS program. Students can apply undergraduate financial aid to graduate courses taken before graduating with the BS.
  • Lower the cost of application to graduate school. The application fee and GRE scores required for admission to the graduate program in Mechanical Engineering at Clemson are waived for students in the BS/MS program.

To be eligible for the BS/MS program, students must have an cumulative GPA of 3.4 or better and must have completed their junior year courses prior to taking graduate courses. Before filling out an application to the BS/MS program, please be aware of the following:

A maximum of 12 credit hours of graduate courses may be applied to the bachelor’s program.

To participate in the BS/MS program, the student must declare the same major in both the graduate and undergraduate programs.

Courses taken as part of the BS/MS program transfer to the Clemson graduate program only. If a BS/MS student enrolls at a different institution for graduate school, the graduate courses will likely not be used to fill graduate degree requirements.

The application for the BS/MS, along with further details and instructions, can be found on the Graduate School’s website here: https://www.clemson.edu/graduate/files/pdfs/GS6-bachelor-to-graduate.pdf. If you have questions about the BS/MS program, please make an appointment with an ME advisor.

Canvas

Canvas is the enterprise learning management system used by Clemson University. A canvas page is created for every undergraduate course offered at Clemson; your instructors will use the course Canvas page to make announcements, post assignments, and so on. A guide on getting started with Canvas is available here: https://www.clemson.edu/canvas/getting_started.html. Students should check Canvas daily while classes are in session.

The ME Student Services team maintains a Canvas group for undergraduate students. Important dates and deadlines will be posted to the Announcements module, and events are posted to the Calendar module. Undergraduate students should be added to the Canvas group early in their first semester in the ME major. ME students are required to check the Canvas page as well as their Clemson.edu email account for important announcements. If you do not see the “MEUndergraduates” page in your Canvas dashboard, please contact your primary advisor.

Change of Major

Changing your major to ME

Students in General Engineering may transfer to the ME major after completing the General Engineering core courses with a C or better and attaining a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.6. Details on General Engineering core courses and major requirements are available in the Academic Catalog: http://catalog.clemson.edu/

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Changing into another major from ME

Students may submit an Undergraduate Change of Program request in iRoar (Students > Student Records > Undergraduate Change of Program) to change to a different major. Students should meet with an advisor in their new department before submitting the change of major request to develop a new course plan, discuss major requirements, impact on the student’s expected graduation date, and so on. Change of major requests are sent to advisors in the requested major, not to ME advisors; they will likely be denied if the students has not consulted with an advisor in the target department.

A change into a new major is a big, as the curriculum will impact the student’s enjoyment of and success in their undergraduate program, as well as their career opportunities after graduation. Before meeting with an advisor in a new department, students should research the courses they would take in the new major and common careers for graduates in the new major. Resources for students considering a change of major can be found here:

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Cooperative Education

Course Substitutions

A course substitution is a request to change the curriculum requirements for an individual student. Course substitutions should be used to request that courses a) for which the student has already received credit at Clemson and b) that do not meet any degree requirements for the bachelor’s in ME be used to satisfy a degree requirement. For instance, a student who has changed their major to Mechanical Engineering from Electrical and Computer Engineering may have taken ECE 2020 and ECE 2110. These two courses do not satisfy and ME degree requirements, but they may be substituted for ECE 2070 and ECE 2080, which are required courses in the ME curriculum. More information and instructions for submitting a course substitution request can be found here: https://www.clemson.edu/registrar/student-menu/student-records/course-substitution.html

Before submitting a course substitution request, students should consult with an ME advisor. Approval of the request is not guaranteed, nor does approval for one student imply that the same request will be approved for other students.

The course substitution procedure applies only to courses for which students have already received Clemson credit. Students who are currently enrolled at Clemson who plan to take courses at another institution and receive Clemson credit should follow the procedure for transferring credits to Clemson.

Creative Inquiry

Creative Inquiry (CI) courses (ME 2900/3900/4900) allow undergraduate students opportunities to work on team research projects under the guidance of a faculty advisor. CI research contributes to the ME academic mission by allowing students to apply what they’ve learned in the ME curriculum to current projects in engineering and by providing research experience to prepare students for careers in industry and academia.

Creative inquiry courses are listed in the iRoar class schedule as ME 2900, ME 3900, and ME 4900. Different section numbers are assigned to different research courses. The Student Services team will send descriptions of active CI projects to ME students each semester before the first day of classes. Instructor approval is required for enrollment in creative inquiry; to enroll in a creative inquiry course, contact the instructor listed in iRoar. Students can receive one to three credit hours per semester for participation in a CI course. Students should consult with the course instructor to decide how many credit hours to register for based on the amount of time they can commit to the project. Instructions for enrolling in a variable credit course can be found here: https://www.clemson.edu/registrar/documents/training-materials/variable-credit.pdf

Creative Inquiry credit hours can be used to satisfy one ME technical elective requirement in the bachelor’s curriculum if the student accumulates 7 or more credit hours on a single CI project. Students must fill out the CI approval form here: http://www.clemson.edu/cecas/departments/me/academics/undergraduate/media/ci.pdf, get the signature of the CI project advisor, and submit the signed form to an ME advisor. The student will receive email confirmation from an advisor once the request has been approved or denied.

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Credits to Be Earned at Another School

Students earning a degree at Clemson are permitted to take classes at other colleges/universities to fulfill some degree requirements. Students should be aware of the following policies before requesting to take classes elsewhere:

  • The Transfer Course Equivalency List (https://www.clemson.edu/admissions/tcel/) can be used to check whether the course you plan to take elsewhere has a Clemson equivalent. If the course you intend to take at another institution is not listed in the TCEL, you should get a course description and syllabus for the course you intend to take elsewhere. These should be presented to the academic department at Clemson that offers the equivalent course. A list of department personnel who can evaluate course equivalency is available in the Enrolled Student Services Office in 104 Sikes Hall.
  • Work completed at other institutions will not affect a student’s Clemson GPA. Courses taken elsewhere will affect the student’s LIFE GPA, which is used to determine eligibility for the LIFE Scholarship.
  • To be eligible for graduation, a student must have completed 37 of their last 43 credit hours at Clemson.
  • A course that has previously been forgiven at Clemson may not be transferred in from another institution to fulfill any degree requirement.
  • The student must submit a signed approval form to Enrolled Student Services before taking a class at another institution and must also submit an official transcript from the other institution after a final grade is issued.

To receive credit for classes taken at another school, students must:

  • Check the Transfer Course Equivalency List. When you go to the TCEL, you will need to know:
    • The name and location of the school
    • The course number of the class as listed in the other school’s course catalog
  • Fill out the Approval of Credits to be Earned at Another School Please read the reverse side of the form carefully, as it contains important instructions for completing the credit transfer process. If the course you intend to take at another institution is listed in the TCEL, bring the completed form to your major advisor for signature. See below for what to do if the planned course is not listed in the TCEL.
  • Deliver the signed form to Enrolled Student Services Office at 104 Sikes Hall.
  • Once your course is completed, have an official transcript sent directly to Clemson. If you do not send an official transcript, the credits will not be transferred and cannot be used to satisfy your undergraduate degree requirements.

If the course you intend to take at another institution is not listed in the TCEL, you will need to establish that the intended course has a Clemson equivalent. You’ll need to get a course description and syllabus for the course you intend to take and present that information to the department in which the course is offered. A list of departmental designees is available in the Enrolled Student Services Office in 104 Sikes Hall.

Curriculum

All colleges and departments within Clemson University define academic requirements that must be met before an undergraduate degree is awarded. ME staff and faculty are available to provide guidance on course planning, but responsibility for meeting the degree requirements rests with the student. For this reason, it is the student’s responsibility to be aware of academic requirements throughout their college careers and complete those requirements within prescribed deadlines and time limits.

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Curriculum Chart

A suggested course plan for ME majors is shown in the curriculum chart below. Students are not required to follow this plan exactly; students can take ME courses in any semester as long as prerequisite, corequisite or other course requirements are satisfied.

 

Freshman Semester 1 CH Freshman Semester 2 CH
ENGR 1050 Engineering Discipline & Skills I 1 ENGR 2080 Engr. Graphics w/ Computer Apps 2
ENGR 1060 Engineering Discipline & Skills II 1 ENGR 1070 Programming & Problem Solving I 1
CH 1010 General Chemistry 4 ENGR 1080 Programming & Problem Solving II 1
ENGL 1030 Accelerated Composition 3 ENGR 1090 Programming & Problems Applications 1
MATH 1060 Calculus of One Variable I 4 MATH 1080 Calculus of One Variable II 4
Arts/Humanities/Soc. Sci. Requirement1 3 PHYS 1220 Physics w/ Calculus I 3
PHYS 1240 Physics Laboratory I 1
Arts/Humanities/Soc. Sci. Requirement1 3
Sophomore Semester 1 CH Sophomore Semester 2 CH
ME 2000 Sophomore Seminar 1 ME 2040 Mechanics of Materials 3
ME 2010 Statics & Dynamics for Mech. Engr. 5 ME 2030 Foundations of Thermal & Fluid Systems 3
MATH 2060 Calculus of Several Variables 4 MATH 2080 Intro to Ordinary Differential Equations 4
PHYS 2210 Physics with Calculus II 3 MSE 2100 Intro. to Materials Science 3
Option:2 Option:3
A. MSE 2100 Intro. to Materials Science or 3 A. ME 2220 Mechanical Engineering II or 2
B. ME 2220 Mechanical Engineering Lab I 2 B. ECE 2070/2080 Basic Electrical Engr. & Lab 3
Junior Semester 1 CH Junior Semester 2 CH
ME 3070 Foundations of Mechanical Systems 3 ME 3040 Heat Transfer 3
ME 3080 Fluid Mechanics 3 ME 3050 Modeling & Analysis of Dynamic Systems 3
ME 3030 Thermodynamics 3 ME 3060 Fundamentals of Machine Design 3
MATH 3650 Intro to Numerical Analysis 3 ME 3120 Manufacturing Processes & Their Application 3
ENGL 3140 Technical Writing 3 Option:2
Option:2 A. ME 3330 Mechanical Engineering Lab II or 2

A. ECE 2070/2080 Basic Electrical Engr. & Lab

3 B. Statistics Requirement4 3
B. ME 3330 Mechanical Engineering Lab II 2
Senior Semester 1 CH Senior Semester 2 CH
ME 4010 Mechanical Engineering Design 3 ME 4000 Senior Seminar 1
ME Technical Elective I5 3 ME 4020 Internship in Engineering Design 3
ME 4030 Control & Integr. of Multi-domain Sys 3 ME Technical Elective II5 3
Arts/Humanities/Soc. Sci. Requirement 3 Professional Requirement6 3
Option:2 Option:2
A. Technical Elective III or 3 A. ME 4440 Mechanical Engineering Lab II or 2
B. ME 4440 Mechanical Engineering Lab III 2 B. Technical Elective III7 3
TOTAL CURRICULUM HOURS 125

Prerequisite/Corequisite List

To be filled in

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ME Required Courses

Descriptions of courses required to fulfill the degree requirements for the BS in Mechanical Engineering follow. Students can track their progress toward their degree using Degree Works.


ME 2000 - Sophomore Seminar (1 Credit)
Seminars address the Mechanical Engineering program, the profession, student best practices, and career paths. Invited presenters and faculty provide lectures and demonstrations. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 2010 with a C or better.

ME 2010 - Statics and Dynamics for Mechanical Engineers (5 Credits)
Vector analysis of the effects of forces, couples, and force-systems on rigid bodies. Conditions of static equilibrium for simple structures, including pulleys, trusses, beams, frames. Kinematics and kinetics of general rigid body motion in 2-D. Applications of Newton’s laws, energy methods, and impulse momentum methods to simple machine elements. Preq: MATH 1060 or MATH 1070, with a C or better; and MATH 1080 and PHYS 1220, each with a C or better; and both ENGR 1070 and ENGR 1080, or ENGR 1410, with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ENGR 1090 and ENGR 2080 and PHYS 1240 and MATH 2060, each with a C or better. Coreq: ME 2011.

ME 2220 - Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I (2 Credits)
Discovery of mechanical engineering principles and phenomena. Introduction to laboratory safety practices, instrumentation, calibration techniques, data analysis, and report writing. Introduction to basic manufacturing processes. Preq: PHYS 1220 and PHYS 1240 and MATH 1080, each with a C or better.

ME 2030 - Foundations of Thermal and Fluid Systems (3 Credits)
Introduction to control volumes, conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy. Concepts of work and heat are introduced, including rate forms. Properties of pure substances. Preq: MATH 2060 and PHYS 2210, each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 2220 with a C or better.

ME 2040 - Mechanics of Materials (3 Credits)
Relationships between external loads on solid bodies or members and the resulting internal effects and dimension changes, including the derivation of rational formulas for stresses and deformations and the identification and use of important mechanical properties of engineering materials. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060 and ME 2010, each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: MATH 2080 and ME 2220 and MSE 2100, each with a C or better.

ME 3030 - Thermodynamics (3 Credits)
Study of the second law and entropy. Includes applications to fixed mass systems and control volumes; vapor and gas power cycles; mixtures of gases; vapor psychrometrics; combustion and the third law. Thermochemical equilibrium. Preq: ME 2030 with a C or better.

ME 3040 - Heat Transfer (3 Credits)
Study of steady and transient heat conduction, free and forced convection, radiation, and multi-mode heat transfer. Emphasizes analytical and numerical solutions to engineering heat transfer problems with a design orientation. Preq: MATH 2080 and ME 3080 each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: MATH 3650 with a C or better.

ME 3050 - Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems (3 Credits)
Presents techniques for developing and analyzing models of mechanical, electrical, electromechanical, fluid and thermal systems. Transient, steady-state and frequency response are determined using analytical and numerical methods. Covers tools for stability analysis and state-space representation. Covers linear free- and forced-vibrations in single- and multi-degree-of-freedom systems with lumped-parameters representation, methods of vibration absorption and isolations. Preq: ECE 2070 and ECE 2080 and MATH 2080 and MATH 3650, each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 3070 with a C or better.

ME 3060 - Fundamentals of Machine Design (3 Credits)
Introduction to failure theory and fatigue analysis. Integration of these topics with selected portions of mechanics of materials and application of them to the design and analysis of machine elements. Preq: ME 2040 and ME 3070, each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: MATH 3650 with a C or better.

ME 3070 - Foundations of Mechanical Systems (3 Credits)
Introduction to physical elements and mechanisms that define basic mechanical engineering systems. Application of kinematic and kinetic analysis to mechanisms and the role of design in mechanisms. Preq: ME 2010 with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 2040 with a C or better.

ME 3080 - Fluid Mechanics (3 Credits)
Behavior of fluids at rest or in motion, including the study of fluid properties. Emphasizes a rational, analytical approach from which are developed basic principles of broad applicability to all fields of engineering. Includes Honors sections. Preq: ME 2010 and ME 2030, each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: MATH 2080 with a C or better.

ME 3120 - Manufacturing Processes and Their Application (3 Credits)
Fundamental principles associated with production processes and their application to the manufacture of products from metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. Emphasizes the physical and quantitative aspects of processing, the selection of processes to create products, and the identification processes used to manufacture existing products. Preq: MSE 2100 with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 3040 and ME 3060 and ME 3330, each with a C or better.

ME 3330 - Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II (2 Credits)
Mechanical engineering principles and phenomena are reinforced through student conducted experiments. Presentation of fundamentals of instrumentation, calibration techniques, data analysis, and report writing in the context of laboratory experiments. Preq: MATH 2080 and ME 2030 and ME 2220, each with a C or better.

ME 4000 - Senior Seminar (1 Credits)
Seminars address the problems encountered by engineering graduates in professional practice. Invited lecturers as well as faculty provide the lectures and demonstrations. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 4010 with a C or better.

ME 4010 - Mechanical Engineering Design (3 Credits)
Project-oriented course in mechanical engineering emphasizing the role of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in design and on written reporting of design solutions. Influence of economics and optimization, concurrent development, integration of design and manufacturing, and system creation are utilized for engineering design decisions. Preq: ENGL 3140 and ME 3030 and ME 3040 and ME 3050 and ME 3060, each with a C or better (concurrent enrollment in one of the preceding ME courses is permitted, but student must request a prerequisite override from the undergraduate coordinator). Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 3120 with a C or better.

ME 4020 - Internship in Engineering Design (3 Credits)
Creative application of general engineering knowledge in solving an open-ended design problem provided by a sponsor typically external to the University. Progress is evaluated by a faculty jury. Students present results to the jury and sponsor through written reports and oral presentations addressing University written/oral competency goals. Students must have completed all required 3000-level ME courses before enrolling in this course. Preq: ME 4010 with a C or better. Coreq: ME 4021.

ME 4440 - Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III (2 Credits)
Continuation of ME 3330. Mechanical engineering principles and phenomena are reinforced through student-conducted experiments. Presentation of fundamentals of instrumentation, calibration techniques, data analysis, and report writing in the context of laboratory experiments. Preq: ME 3330; and MATH 3020 or STAT 4110, each with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 3060 with a C or better.

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ME Technical Electives

A list of technical electives offered through the Mechanical Engineering Department follows. Students must complete at least two ME technical electives to fulfill the bachelor’s degree requirements. In addition, ME technical electives may be used to satisfy the professional requirement and the third technical elective requirement in the ME curriculum.

ME 4150 - Undergraduate Research (1-3 Credits)
Individual research projects conducted under the direct supervision and guidance of a faculty member. Includes Honors sections. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Preq: Consent of instructor. ME
4150 may only be taken once for technical elective credit
.

ME 4170 - Mechatronics System Design (3 Credits)
Mechatronics integrates control, sensors, actuators, and computers to create a variety of electromechanical products. Includes concepts of design, appropriate dynamic system modeling, analysis, sensors, actuating devices, and real time microprocessor interfacing and control. Laboratory experiments, simulation, and design projects are used to exemplify the course concepts. Preq: ME 3050 with a C or better. Coreq: ME 4171.

ME 4180 - Finite Element Analysis in Mechanical Engineering Design (3 Credits)
Introduction to the finite element method and solid modeling, finite element modeling and analysis using commercial codes; analysis strategies using finite elements; applications to heat transfer, fluid flow, and structures. Preq: ME 2040 and ME 3040 and ME 3080, each with a C or better. Coreq: ME 4181.

ME 4200 - Energy Sources and Their Utilization (3 Credits)
Covers availability and use of energy sources such as fossil fuels, solar (direct and indirect), and nuclear; addresses energy density and constraints to use (technical and economic) for each source. Preq: ME 3030 and ME 3040, each with a C or better.

ME 4210 - Introduction to Compressible Flow (3 Credits)
Introductory concepts to compressible flow; methods of treating one-dimensional gas dynamics including flow in nozzles and diffusers, normal shocks, moving and oblique shocks, Prandtl-Meyer Flow, Fanno Flow, Rayleigh Flow, and reaction propulsion systems. Preq: ME 3030 and ME 3080, each with a C or better.

ME 4220 - Design of Gas Turbines (3 Credits)
Guiding principles in gas turbine cycles are reviewed. Turbine and compressor design procedures and performance prediction for both axial and radial flow machines are presented. Methods of design of rotary heat-exchangers and retrofitting gas turbine for regenerative operation are presented. Design projects are used to illustrate the procedures. Preq: ME 3080 with a C or better.

ME 4230 - Introduction to Aerodynamics (3 Credits)
Basic theories of aerodynamics are presented for the purpose of accurately predicting the aerodynamic forces and moments which act on a vehicle in flight. Preq: ME 3080 with a C or better.

ME 4250 - Aircraft Conceptual Design (3 Credits)
This course develops the aspects involved in the conceptual design of an aircraft. Focus is on the interplay between goals and constraints in the process of the design of a subsonic aircraft. Preq: ME 3080.

ME 4260 - Nuclear Energy (3 Credits)
Engineering methods and science principles are considered for the design of components to nuclear power stations. A systems level understanding is emphasized. Includes nuclear fuel cycle and regulatory considerations. Preq: CE 3410; or CHE 3210; or EES 3100; or both ME 3030 and ME 3040; or ME 3100; or MSE 3270; or PHYS 3220; each with a C or better.

ME 4280 - Thermal-Hydraulics of Nuclear Reactors (3 Credits)
Provides the mechanical engineer with the basic concepts required to understand the thermal-hydraulic behavior of nuclear reactors in normal operating conditions. Preq: ME 3040 with a C or better.

ME 4290 - Thermal Environmental Control (3 Credits)
Mechanical vapor compression refrigeration cycles, refrigerants, thermoelectrical cooling systems, cryogenics, thermodynamic properties of air, psychometric charts, heating and cooling coils, solar radiation, heating and cooling loads, insulation systems. Preq: ME 3030and ME 3080, each with a C or better.

ME 4300 - Mechanics of Composite Materials (3 Credits)
Develops fundamental relationships for predicting the mechanical* and thermal response of multi-layered materials and structures. Develops micromechanical and macromechanical relationships for laminated materials emphasizing continuous filament composites. Discusses the unique nature of composites and the advantages of designing with composites. Preq: ME 2040 with a C or better.

ME 4310 - Applied Fluids Engineering (3 Credits)
Applications-oriented course in industrial fluids engineering, primarily directed toward the analysis and design of piping systems and components for liquid and gas flow. Topics include friction factors, head loss, flow capacities, piping networks, flow measurement, pumps, control valves, and hydraulic and pneumatic components. Preq: ME 3080 and ME 3330, each with a C or better.

ME 4320 - Advanced Strength of Materials (3 Credits)
Topics in strength of materials not covered in ME 3020. Three-dimensional stress and strain transformations, theories of failure, shear center, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, and energy methods. Other topics such as stress concentrations and fatigue concepts are treated as time permits. Preq: ME 2040 with a C or better.

ME 4400 - Materials for Aggressive Environments (3 Credits)
Emphasizes the engineering aspects of selecting materials for applications in aggressive environments. Various types of materials degradation are discussed as are methods for wastage prevention, including especially engineering design and materials selection approaches. Structural metallic alloys are emphasized; however, technically important ceramics and polymers are also discussed. Preq: ME 3060 with a C or better.

ME 4530 - Dynamic Performance of Vehicles (3 Credits)
Introduces techniques for analyzing the dynamic behavior of vehicles. Types of vehicles to be considered are chosen from aircraft, surface ships, automobiles and trucks, railway vehicles, and magnetically levitated vehicles. Preq: ME 3050 with a C or better.

ME 4540 - Design of Machine Elements (3 Credits)
Design of common machine elements including clutches, brakes, bearings, springs, and gears. Optimization techniques and numerical methods are employed as appropriate. Preq: ME 3060 with a C or better.

ME 4550 - Design for Manufacturing (3 Credits)
Concepts of product and process design for automated manufacturing are considered. Topics include product design for automated manufacturing, inspection and assembly, using automation, industrial robots, knowledge-based systems and concepts of flexible product manufacture. Preq: ME 3060 with a C or better. Preq or concurrent enrollment: ME 3120 with a C or better.

ME 4570 - Fundamentals of Wind Power (3 Credits)
Introduces wind turbine systems, including wind energy potential and application to power generation. Topics include wind energy principles, wind site assessment, wind turbine components, power generation machinery control systems, connection to the electric grid, and maintenance. May also be offered as ECE 4570. Preq: ECE 2070 or ECE 2070, with a C or better. Cross-listed with ECE 4570.

ME 4710 - Computer-Aided Engineering Analysis and Design (3 Credits)
Students are exposed to geometric and solid modeling, finite elements, optimization, and rapid-prototyping. Students design an artifact, represent it on the computer, analyze it using FEA, then optimize before prototyping it. Emphasizes the use of computer-based tools for engineering design. Preq: ENGR 1090 and ME 3070, each with a C or better. Coreq: ME 4711 (lab component).

Non-ME Technical Electives

BE 4240 - Ecological Engineering 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Focuses on engineering solutions to environmental and socioeconomic problems using ecological design principles. Explores ecosystem processes as they pertain to sustainable development, natural resource protection, food and energy production, waste management, and environmental restoration. Engineering fundamentals and ecological modeling are integral components of this course. Preq: CE 3410 or CHE 2300 or ME 3080.

BE 4400 Sustainable Energy Engineering 3 Credits (2 Contact Hours)
Investigation into merging renewable energy resources, including detailed study of solar, wind, and bioenergy alternatives. Also includes principles, technologies, and performance evaluation of components for these technologies and an introduction to tidal, hydro, geothermal, and other energy; energy conservation; cogeneration; financial, economical, and other issues related to alternative energy sources. May also be offered as CE 4400. Preq: ENGR 1020 with a C or better. Coreq: BE 4401.

BIOE 4350 Computational Modeling in Bioengineering3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
This course introduces students to computational modeling applied to bioengineering problems. Students use modeling approaches (finite element, agent-based, systems network, simple differential equations, etc.) to predict, analyze and engineer biologically-relevant processes-drug diffusion, biomaterial interactions, biomechanics performance, bioelectrical conduction, cellular signaling, and tissue remodeling. Preq: MATH 2080.

CH 3310 Physical Chemistry 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Includes the gaseous state, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, and atomic and molecular structure, from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Credit toward a degree will be given for only one of CH 3300 or CH 3310. Preq: MATH 2060 and PHYS 2210.

CH 3600 Chemical Biology 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to the chemical foundations of biological phenomena, focusing on bioorganic, biophysical, bioinorganic, and bioanalytic chemistry principles. Preq: CH 2010 or CH 2230.

CH 4040 Bioinorganic Chemistry 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Covers fundamentals of bioinorganic chemistry with review of necessary inorganic and biochemical concepts. Topics include metal uptake, transport, and storage in biological systems; functions of metals in proteins; metal ion interactions with nucleic acids; physical methods used in bioinorganic chemistry; heavy element toxicity, radiopharmaceuticals and other metallodrugs. Includes Honors sections. Preq: BCHM 3010 or BCHM 3050 or CH 2050.

CH 4250 Medicinal Chemistry 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Survey of the pharmaceutical drug discovery process. Covers discovery of candidate compounds, bioassay methods, and associated regulatory and commercial issues. Case studies are selected from the current literature. Preq: CH 2240.

ECE 4700 Vehicle Electronics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to vehicle electronic systems and networks. Topics include a review of electronic systems in automotive and aerospace applications; vehicle components, sensors and actuators; communication busses; electric power generation and distribution in vehicle systems; vehicle diagnostics; reliability; and trends in vehicle system design. Preq: ECE 3200 with a C or better.

ECE 4710 Electric Vehicles and Energy Storage 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to hybrid electric propulsion systems and energy storage systems. Topics include a review of fundamentals of electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles architectures covering reasons for hybridization, energy analysis of architecture and components; overview of energy storage systems (batteries and supercapacitors); modeling of components; vehicle simulation; and supervisory control. Preq: ECE 3200 with a C or better.

EES 4010 Environmental Engineering 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to the field of environmental engineering. Topics include environmental phenomena, impact of pollutants in the aquatic environment, solid-waste management, air pollution control, radiological health, and simple water and wastewater treatment systems. Preq: Junior standing in the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences. Preq or concurrent enrollment: CE 3410 or CHE 2300 or ME 3080; or GEOL 4820 and either GEOL 4150 or MATH 2060.

EES 4100 Environmental Radiation Protection I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Fundamental principles of radiological health and radiation safety. Topics include radiation fundamentals, basic concepts of environmental radiation protection, internal and external dosimetry, environmental dose calculations and radiation protection standards. Preq: EES 4090 and PHYS 2210, each with a C or better.

EES 4300 Air Pollution Engineering 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introductory course in air pollution and its control. Topics include air pollutants and effects, sources, dispersion models, engineering controls, and air-quality legislation. Preq: EES 2020 or EES 4010.

IE 4400 Decision Support Systems in Industrial Engineering 3 Credits (2 Contact Hours)
Study of design of decision support systems for production and service systems based on operations research models. Includes use of spreadsheets, databases, and integrated software development environments to implement decision support systems. Preq: ENGR 1090 with a C or better or ENGR 1410 with a C or better; or both CHE 1300 with a C or better and one of CPSC 1010 with a C or better or CPSC 1110 with a C or better or CPSC 1610 with a C or better. Coreq: IE 4401.

IE 4570 Transportation and Logistics Engineering 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduces transportation and logistics systems analysis from both analytical and practical perspectives. Covers methods for identifying level-of-service metrics and measuring system performance. Discusses key aspects of modeling, simulation, and other techniques for economic and quantitative analysis of transportation and logistics planning issues. Preq: Senior standing in an engineering, science, or management program; and MATH 1020 or MATH 1060 or MATH 1070.

IE 4620 Six Sigma Quality 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Study of DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control) elements of Six Sigma, project management, process analysis, quality function deployment, hypothesis testing, gage R&R, data analysis, multivari-analysis, design of experiments, statistical process control, and process capability analysis. Preq: One of STAT 3010 or STAT 4110 or IE 3600 or MATH 3010 or MATH 3020 or MATH 3090 or CHE 3070.

IE 4880 Human Factors Engineering 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to human performance and limitations in the design of effective and efficient systems. Covers issues related to changes in technology, impact of design on society, ethical issues in design of systems, and the cost benefits from designing systems and environments that often challenge perceived notions of benefits. Preq: Junior standing; and MATH 1020 or MATH 1060 or MATH 1070.

MATH 4000 Theory of Probability 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Principal topics include combinatorial theory, probability axioms, random variables, expected values; special discrete and continuous distributions, jointly distributed random variables, correlation, conditional expectation, law of large numbers, central limit theorem. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060 with a C or better.

MATH 4100 Number Theory 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to theory of integers and related number systems. Topics include historical development, principle of mathematical induction, divisibility, primes, congruences, number-theoretic functions, primitive roots, quadratic residues, and diophantine equations. Preq: MATH 3190 with a C or better.

MATH 4120 Algebra I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Provides a first introduction to algebra with topics including modular arithmetic, ring theory and group theory. Preq: MATH 3110 and MATH 3190, each with a C or better.

MATH 4190 Discrete Mathematical Structures I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Applies theoretical concepts of sets, functions, binary relations, graphs, Boolean algebras, propositional logic, semigroups, groups, homomorphisms, and permutation groups to computer characteristics and design, words over a finite alphabet and concatenation, binary group codes, and other communication or computer problems. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 3110 with a C or better.

MATH 4340 Advanced Engineering Mathematics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Fourier series, Laplace and Fourier transform, and numerical methods for solving initial value and boundary-value problems in partial differential equations are developed. Applications to diffusion wave and Dirichelet problems are given. Matrix methods and special functions are utilized. Preq: MATH 2080 with a C or better.

MATH 4350 Complex Variables 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Elementary functions; differentiation and integration of analytic functions; Taylor and Laurent series; contour integration and residue theory; conformal mapping; Schwartz-Christoffel transformation. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060.

MATH 4400 Materials for Aggressive Environments 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Emphasizes the engineering aspects of selecting materials for applications in aggressive environments. Various types of materials degradation are discussed as are methods for wastage prevention, including especially engineering design and materials selection approaches. Structural metallic alloys are emphasized; however, technically important ceramics and polymers are also discussed. Preq: ME 3060 with a C or better.

MATH 4530 Complex Variables 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Elementary functions; differentiation and integration of analytic functions; Taylor and Laurent series; contour integration and residue theory; conformal mapping; Schwartz-Christoffel transformation. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060.

MATH 4600 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to the problems of numerical analysis emphasizing computational procedures and application. Topics include sources of error and conditioning, matrix methods, systems of linear equations, nonlinear equations, interpolation and approximation by splines, polynominals, and trigonometric functions. Preq: MATH 2080 and MATH 3110 and MATH 3600, each with a C or better.

MATH 4630 Real Analysis I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
A thorough treatment of the real numbers and metric spaces. Topics include countability, limit points, open and closed sets, compactness, connectedness, limit supremum and infimum, sequences and series, types of convergence, limits of functions, continuity and differentiation. Credit will only be given for one of MATH 4530 or MATH 4630. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060 and MATH 3190, each with a C or better.

PHYS 3110 Introduction to the Methods of Theoretical Physics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Survey of methods and techniques of problem-solving in physics. Emphasizes the application of mathematical techniques to the solution of problems of vectors, fields, and waves in mechanics, electromagnetism, and quantum physics. Preq: PHYS 2220.

PHYS 3210 Mechanics I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Statics, motions of particles and rigid bodies, vibratory motion, gravitation, properties of matter, flow of fluids. Includes Honors sections. Preq: PHYS 2210.

PHYS 3550 Modern Physics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Study of the topics of modern physics, including relativity, atomic physics, quantum mechanics, condensed-matter physics, nuclear physics, and elementary particles. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060 and PHYS 2220.

PHYS 4170 Introduction to Molecular Biophysics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Introduction to the application of physics to biological problems. Topics include review of elementary chemical and biological principles, physics of biological molecules, and fundamentals of radiation biophysics. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2060 and PHYS 2210.

PHYS 4200 Atmospheric Physics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Study of physical processes governing atmospheric phenomena. Topics include thermodynamics of dry and moist air, solar and terrestrial radiative processes, convection and cloud physics, precipitation processes, hydrodynamic equations of motion and large-scale motion of the atmosphere, numerical weather prediction, atmospheric electricity. Preq: MATH 1080; and PHYS 2080 or PHYS 2210.

PHYS 4320 Optics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Covers a selection of topics, depending on the interest of the student. Topics may include the formation of images by lenses and mirrors, design of optical instruments, electromagnetic wave propagation, interference, diffraction, optical activity, lasers, and holography. Includes Honors sections. Preq: PHYS 2210.

PHYS 4410 Electromagnetics I 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Study of the foundations of electromagnetic theory. Topics include electric fields, electric potential, dielectrics, electric circuits, solution of electrostatic boundary-value problems, magnetic fields, and magnetostatics. Includes Honors sections. Preq: MATH 2080 and PHYS 2210.

PHYS 4520 Nuclear and Particle Physics 3 Credits (3 Contact Hours)
Study of our present knowledge concerning subatomic matter. Experimental results are stressed. Topics include particle spectra, detection techniques, Regge pole analysis, quark models, proton structure, nuclear structure, scattering and reactions. Includes Honors sections.

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Former Students Returning

Students who previously enrolled as a regular student at Clemson but are not enrolled in the current semester are classified as former students. If a student doesn’t enroll in classes for a semester, they will need to apply for re-entrance to Clemson before resuming classes. Information on former students returning and the Application for Re-Entrance can be found here: https://www.clemson.edu/registrar/student-menu/admittance/former-student.html

Graduation

Students enrolled in their final semester of classes (in which the student will complete all required coursework for the undergraduate degree) must apply to graduate in order to receive a degree from Clemson University. Students who do not submit a graduation application will not be issued a diploma or be allowed to participate in the graduation ceremony. Graduation application deadlines are posted on the Registrar’s website here: https://www.clemson.edu/registrar/graduation/.

The graduation application is available in iRoar under Student Records. Students who have submitted a graduation application will be contacted by an ME advisor after the application deadline to start the graduation check process. The student is responsible for answering emails regarding graduation in a timely fashion.

Before applying to graduate, the student should check Degree Works (iRoar > Student Records > Degree Works). Students should keep the following in mind during their graduation semester:

  • Degree Works is imperfect. Some requirements may show up as missing even after you’ve passed a course that meets the requirement. If you have any questions about whether you are on track to graduate, please talk to your advisor.
  • If you have declared a minor, it should be listed at the top of the Student View worksheet. If a minor is not listed, you will not receive the minor, even if you have fulfilled all the coursework requirements for the minor. If you need to add minor,submit an Undergraduate Change of Program Request in iRoar > Students > Student Records > Undergraduate Change of Program.

If you have not been contacted by an advisor regarding a degree check by TIME FRAME in your graduating semester, contact your ME advisor IMMEDIATELY.

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Minors

From the Clemson 2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog:

A minor consists of at least 15 semester hours, with no fewer than nine credits at the 3000 level or higher.* A student cannot major and minor in the same field or acquire a minor that is not allowed by the degree program. In programs that require a minor, courses may not be used to fulfill both the major and minor requirements. Only courses that are outside the major’s subject code may be used to fulfill minor requirements in programs where a minor is required. Regardless of whether a minor, concentration, or emphasis area is required, courses may not be used to fulfill a second minor, concentration, or emphasis area. Even though a course may satisfy two requirements, the credits will only count once toward total hours. Students are encouraged to contact the department offering the minor for advising.

Common Minors for ME Students

No minor is required to complete the BS in Mechanical Engineering at Clemson. Minors popular with Mechanical Engineering undergraduates include:

Mathematical Sciences Minor (15 credits minimum): Requires MATH 2080 and 12 additional credits in MATH or STAT courses numbered 3000 or higher, excluding MATH 3080, MATH 3150, MATH 3160, MATH 3820, MATH 3990, MATH 4080, MATH 4300, MATH 4320, MATH 4810, MATH 4820, MATH 4910, MATH 4920, MATH 4990 and STAT 3090. Students may not use both MATH 3650 and MATH 4600.

The ME curriculum includes MATH 2080, MATH 3650 and a statistics requirement that is satisfied by MATH 3020 or STAT 4110. The non-ME technical elective requirement can be satisfied by the following mathematics courses: MATH 4000, MATH 4100, MATH 4120, MATH 4190, MATH 4340, MATH 4350, MATH 4400, MATH 4530, MATH 4600, or MATH 4630. For students enrolled for catalog year 2017 or later, the ME Professional requirement can be satisfied by any 3000- or 4000-level class required to complete a minor; thus, it is possible for ME undergraduates to add a minor in math without adding credit hours beyond the BS degree requirements.

Business Administration Minor (21 credits minimum): requires ACCT 2010, ECON 2110, ECON 2120 (prereq. ECON 2110), FIN 3060 (prereq. ACCT 2010 and statistics course, which is satisfied by STAT 4110), LAW 3220, MGT 2010 and MKT 3010. Also, FIN 3060 has prerequisites of ACCT 2010 and a statistics course.

A complete list of pre-determined undergraduate minors is available in the undergraduate catalog here: http://catalog.clemson.edu/content.php?catoid=18&navoid=539.

Cluster Minors

Students may also choose a cluster minor (15 credits minimum). The Cluster minor allows students a somewhat wider choice of course materials than is possible with the conventional subject-matter minor. The general requirement for the Cluster minor is 15 credits in courses numbered higher than 3000, except where noted differently, chosen according to one of the plans below. Courses within the student’s major course rubric may not be included in the Cluster minor.

  • Group I - Social Sciences: anthropology, economics, geography, history, justice studies, political science, psychology, sociology
  • Group II - Life Sciences1: biochemistry, biological sciences, genetics, microbiology
  • Group III - Physical Sciences1: chemistry, geology, physics
  • Group IV - Engineering1: courses in all engineering majors, plus engineering mechanics and engineering graphics

1 No course in the 1000 series is acceptable toward the minor and not more than six hours in the 2000 series are acceptable.

Adding a Minor

To add a minor, students should submit a Change of Academic Program request in iRoar by logging into iRoar and navigating to Student > Student Records > Undergraduate Change of Program.

Go to the record for the BS in Mechanical Engineering and scroll all the way to the right to edit. Once the request is submitted, it will be sent to an ME academic advisor for approval. Students are not required to meet with an ME advisor to add a minor. Students are not required to complete a minor requested in iRoar in order to graduate with the bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering.

Students can verify that a minor has been added in Degree Works by logging into iRoar and navigating to Student Records > Degree Works. Information regarding the student’s degree program can be found at the top of the first page as shown below.

Completing a Minor

In order to receive credit for a minor, students must declare the minor using the change of academic program request. Student will not receive credit for an undeclared minor, even if the coursework requirements for the minor have been satisfied. Students must declare the minor before graduation.

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Registration

Students are responsible for registering themselves for classes. Each fall and spring semester, ME majors must meet with an ME advisor before registering for classes. Students will not be able to register for classes without obtaining a registration PIN from an ME advisor. Advisors will distribute a PIN number only after the student submits a preregistration form at an advising appointment.

 

Scholarships

The most common scholarships held by Clemson students are the LIFE and Palmetto Fellows scholarships. Some general information on these two scholarships is given in this section; students should always contact the Student Financial Aid office (https://www.clemson.edu/financial-aid/contact-us.html) with questions about scholarships, as they have the most up-to-date information on all financial aid.

Co-op and Internships with LIFE or Palmetto Fellows

From the Financial Aid website (links within http://www.clemson.edu/financial-aid/types/scholarships/state-scholarships.html):

If you participate in the Cooperative Education Program and/or certain sanctioned internship programs, you are not eligible to receive the LIFE/Palmetto Scholarship during the term of participation. You may, however, elect to receive the LIFE/Palmetto Scholarship in the succeeding summer term at Clemson provided that you take at least 12 credit hours during the summer. You may also elect to move the award that you would have received during your participation semester to the term immediately following your eighth normal semester (provided that you continue to meet all other eligibility requirements). If you elect to use the LIFE/Palmetto Scholarship during the summer, you will only be expected to earn 27 hours (rather than 30) for that academic year for renewal purposes. If you co-op during a fall or spring semester and do not attend summer session, you are required to earn 15 hours for that academic year.

LIFE GPA worksheet: https://www.clemson.edu/financial-aid/documents/LIFE-GPA.pdf (add local copy?)

Appeals procedure for LIFE, Palmetto and SC HOPE scholarships: https://www.che.sc.gov/Students,FamiliesMilitary/StudentAppeals.aspx

Student Organizations

American Society of Mechanical Engineering

Pi Tau Sigma, the Mechanical Engineering Honor Society

American Association of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers

Society of Automotive Engineers

          Formula SAE

          Baja SAE