Creative Inquiry

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Spring 2021

Phishing for Trolls, Bots, and Hackers: The Generalized Analysis of Online Inauthenticity

Objective:

In this CI, we will explore what we know about what strategies inauthentic online actors use in various contexts and what countermeasures are effective, in order to derive a general theory of online inauthenticity. From that holistic perspective we will derive broad implications for our scientific understanding of inauthenticity and the derivation and testing of novel interventions that are more generally applicable than the present more piecemeal approach.

Principal Investigators:

Jeff Lees, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics (jmlees@clemson.edu)

Darren Linvill, Associate Professor of Communication (darrenl@clemson.edu)

Dawn Sarno, Assistant Professor of Psychology (dmsarno@clemson.edu)

Patrick L. Warren, Associate Professor of Economics (pwarren@clemson.edu)

Project Description:

Phishing for Trolls, Bots, and Hackers: The Generalized Analysis of Online InauthenticityObjective: In this CI, we will explore what we know about what strategies inauthentic online actors use in various contexts and what countermeasures are effective, in order to derive a general theory of online inauthenticity. From that holistic perspective we will derive broad implications for our scientific understanding of inauthenticity and the derivation and testing of novel interventions that are more generally applicable than the present more piecemeal approach.

Full Syllabus


Media Forensics and Health

Objective:

Apply a variety of media forensic techniques to produce weekly analyses of prominent media artifacts in conversations around health care, especially vaccines.

Principal Investigators:

Patrick L. Warren, Associate Professor of Economics (pwarren@clemson.edu)

Darren Linvill, Associate Professor of Communication (darrenl@clemson.edu)

Grad Instructor Steven Sheffield, RCID PhD.

Student (ssheffi@g.clemson.edu)

Project Status:

Continuing, since 2020-08 Project Description Last Fall, we launched the CU Media Forensics Hub. By “Media Forensics” we mean the development and application of state-of-the-art techniques to broaden and deepen our understanding of all media types, while working to increase the capacity of our students and community to apply them. The “Hub” accomplishes this by spanning multiple disciplines and approaches, from history and case studies, to AI and machine learning, to experiments in the lab and the field. We connect widely-spaced entities with a common interest from across disciplines, centers, institutions, and perspectives. In this CI, we will introduce media forensic techniques regularly. Students will use those techniques with increasing levels of expertise to analyze media artifacts from conversations around health, especially around the COVID vaccine, that we jointly identify as interesting and important. As a team, students will publicly report on their findings, in a weekly update to the Hub website, to be disseminated to the CU Hub community and media partners to deepen how the public interprets these media artifacts.

Full Syllabus


Fall 2020

Media Forensics and the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election

Objective: Apply a variety of media forensic techniques to produce weekly analyses of prominent media artifacts in conversations around the 2020 Presidential elections.

Principal Investigators

Patrick L. Warren, Associate Professor of Economics (pwarren@clemson.edu)

Darren Linvill, Associate Professor of Communication (darrenl@clemson.edu)

Grad Assistant

Steven Sheffield, RCID PhD. Student (ssheffi@g.clemson.edu)

Project Status: New as of 2020-08

Project Description

This Fall, we are launching the CU Media Forensics Hub.  By “Media Forensics” we mean the development and application of state-of-the-art techniques to broaden and deepen our understanding of all media types, while working to increase the capacity of our students and community to apply them. The “Hub” accomplishes this by spanning multiple disciplines and approaches, from history and case studies, to AI and machine learning, to experiments in the lab and the field. We connect widely-spaced entities with a common interest from across disciplines, centers, institutions, and perspectives.

In this CI, we will introduce a new media forensic technique each week. Students will use those techniques with increasing levels of expertise to analyze media artifacts from conversations around the 2020 Presidential election that we jointly identify as interesting and important. As a team, students will publicly report on their findings, in a weekly update to the Hub website, to be disseminated to the CU Hub community and media partners to deepen how the public interprets these media artifacts.

Full Syllabus 

Read the Semester Report


Contact Us: mediaforensics@clemson.edu