Soybean information

Public Soybean Varieties.....Growing in the Right Direction

At Clemson University the soybean breeding program is lead by Benjamin D. Fallen at the Pee Dee Research and Extension Center.  The primary objective of the program is to provide genetic solutions that will ultimately lead to new and improved soybean germplasm lines and cultivars to enhance soybean production and soybean profitability for South Carolina farmers.  The soybean breeding program is dedicated to developing both herbicide resistance and conventional soybean varieties that range in maturity from a MG V to a MG VIII with traits desirable in SC.  Traits of interest include yield, insect resistance, disease resistance, genetic diversity and value added traits such as: high oleic acid, increased protein and an improved amino acid profile.

Performance of South Carolina breeding lines with regard to seed yield, agronomic traits and nematode/disease resistance are tested each year in comparison to the performance of known, productive, commercial soybean cultivars.  Evaluation of new lines begins with preliminary breeder tests followed by advanced breeder tests and then selected lines move into regional USDA tests and state variety tests.  See Clemson's Variety Trial website for results of SC official variety performance tests.  

From 2008 to 2013 soybeans were the second or third highest value field crop in SC, averaging over $100 million.   The top producing counties were Clarendon, Dillon, Darlington, Florence, Lee, Horry and Williamsburg.  It is estimated the demand for soybean meal is expected to increase with the increase in livestock production over the next decade.  Also, the demand for soybean oil is expected to increase over the next decade, due to the increase in biodiesel produced from soybean oil and improvements being made to the oil that reduces the need to hydrogenate the oil, eliminating trans fats.

Each state has different growing conditions (climate, disease and insect pressure, etc.) and most of which vary from region to region within the state.  Having a local soybean breeder is important for local farmers, consumers and the economy. For each Bu/A increase in yield from genetic gain, insect resistance, disease resistance, etc. equals increased income for South Carolina soybean producers.  In addition, any traits including high oleic acid or seed composition that might add desirability and value will be beneficial to South Carolina farmers.

Funding is provided by the Public Service Activities Department at Clemson University and through grants from the South Carolina Soybean Board (Check-off funds). Funds provided by this grant supply a portion of the operating funds required for the winter nursery project, supplies, travel, small equipment purchases, and part-time labor. Funding provided by the South Carolina Soybean Board is vital to the on-going soybean breeding effort and future success of the program.  In addition, grants from the United Soybean Board, the USDA-NIFA and others are appreciated and vital to the continued success of the soybean breeding program at Clemson University.

Recent cultivars developed and released by Clemson University include:

CHERAW

  • Group VIII
  • Glyphosate tolerant with RR1 technology
  • Resistant to Southern root-knot nematode (RKN)
  • Resistant to soybean cyst nematode, Race 3 (SCN)
  • Resistant to stem canker disease 
  • High Yields

PAUL

  • Group VIII
  • Named for Paul F. Williams, retired Ag Associate II, Soybean Breeding Program, Clemson University
  • Glyphosate tolerant with RR1 technology
  • Resistant to Southern root-knot nematode (RKN)
  • Resistant to soybean cyst nematode, Race 3 (SCN)
  • Resistant to soybean mosaic virus (SMV)
  • Excellent Yields

Past cultivars developed and released by Clemson University include:

MUSEN

  • Late maturing Group VI
  • Named for Dr. Harold Musen, retired agronomist, Clemson University
  • Widely adapted to a wide range of soils and planting situations
  • Resistant to southern root-knot nematode and Races 3 & 4 soybean cyst nematodes
  • US Plant Variety Protection  

DILLON

  • Group VI
  • Widely adapted to full-season plantings
  • Resistant to southern root-knot and tolerant to lance nematodes
  • Outstanding yield potential
  • Resistant to bacterial pustule and soybean mosaic virus
  • Susceptible to soybean cyst nematode
  • US Plant Variety Protection  

SANTEE

  • Formerly tested as SC91-2007
  • Early Group VII
  • Good seed quality
  • Excellent yields
  • Resistant to Race 3 soybean cyst nematode
  • Resistant to reniform nematode
  • Resistant to stem canker
  • Moderately resistant to Southern root-knot nematode
  • Tolerant to Columbia lance nematode  

HAGOOD

  • Late maturing Group VII
  • Well-suited to both full-season and doublecrop plantings
  • Resistant to southern root-knot and Race 3 soybean cyst nematodes
  • Good tolerance to lance nematode
  • Set state record yield (78 bushels/ac) in 1994 in Spartanburg County
  • Topped the ’98 Irrigated UGA Variety Test at Tifton with 58 bushels/ac
  • Excellent protein content  

MAXCY

  • Mid-Group VIII variety
  • Especially suited to doublecropping
  • Resistant to southern root-knot nematode and Race 3 soybean cyst nematodes
  • Good tolerance to lance nematode
  • Resistant to bacterial pustule and powdery mildew
  • US Plant Variety Protection  

MOTTE

  • High-yielding Group VIII variety
  • 2 to 4 days later and 2 inches taller than Maxcy
  • Excellent variety for doublecropping
  • Resistant to southern root-knot and Race 3 soybean cyst nematodes
  • Good tolerance to lance nematode
  • Fair resistance to peanut root-knot nematode
  • Good tolerance to reniform nematode
  • Performed well in Georgia official variety tests over last three years
  • Susceptible to soybean mosaic virus
  • US Plant Variety Protection

Additional varieties have been released and licensed to seed companies for commercial production.