Welcome to SC BioCRAFT

  • Participants in SC BioCRAFT research at Clemson University, Clemson South Carolina
  • Participants in SC BioCRAFT research at Clemson University, Clemson South Carolina
  • Participant in SC BioCRAFT research at Clemson University, Clemson South Carolina
  • Participants in SC BioCRAFT research at Clemson University, Clemson South Carolina

The primary goal of this COBRE center is to increase the number of NIH-supported biomedical researchers in the state of South Carolina, particularly at Clemson University.

For this purpose, Clemson University's unique strengths in biomaterials and tissue engineering are complemented by expertise in medicine and developmental biology at the Medical University of South Carolina and the University of South Carolina to establish a Bioengineering Center for Regeneration and Formation of Tissues (SC BioCRAFT) at Clemson University.

This COBRE center will significantly augment collaborative efforts in South Carolina to recruit, train, and retain a critical mass of investigators with cross-disciplinary skills to collaborate effectively in the research area of regenerative medicine.

The center is supported by two state-of-the-art facilities, also called cores: Biomaterials Engineering and Testing Core (BET) and Clemson Translational Research Imaging Core (CTRIC).


Overall Success

Helped Junior Faculty Achieve High Accolades

  • 300 Plus publications, 547 presentations, 45 filed patents
  • 300 grants submitted, 88 funded, $20M external funding

Improved Core Facilities at Clemson and Free Access for Junior Faculty

Since the initiation of Phase I, Clemson University, as part of its commitment to our COBRE center and the IDEA program, has funded the purchase of three new systems for Clemson's electron microscopy facility.  A new variable pressure field emission electron microscope, Hitachi SU6600 VPFESEM, provides high-resolution images. A Deben cooling stage with a temperature range of -25° C to +50° C was purchased for the SU6600; the microscopy facility purchased the Hitachi TM 3000 tabletop scanning electron microscope.

The center is a major force for bringing together researchers, clinicians and other health care professionals from across the state to advance biomedical research. Clemson researchers collaborate closely with colleagues at the Medical University of South Carolina and Prisma Health.

Installation of a new dual-beam focused ion system, NB5000 FIB, has been completed.  The Imaging Core has provided multiple services to 45 faculty and students through our Phase I and II COBRE initiative. In 2013, Dr. Terri Bruce, who served as COBRE core Co-Director, was appointed director of the Clemson Light Imaging Facility, which is available to all COBRE participants.  

  • We purchased IVIS Lumina XR equipment and installed it in our animal facility at Godley-Snell Animal Research Center.  This instrument is used extensively by COBRE and non-COBRE personnel.
  • We further purchased a small animal ultrasound system from Visual Sonic, Vevo2100.  It has a new digital platform that delivers outstanding performance in a wide range of animal models and applications including cardiovascular, cancer, and inflammation.  Many PIs are using this equipment for research that would not otherwise be possible.
  • A Vivo-Vasc software program was purchased that uses ultrasound data from Vevo2100 and provides all vital statistics for vascular health such as quantifying wall motion using advanced speckle tracking, assessing stiffness using pulse wave velocity, and measuring microanatomy using vessel wall analysis.

SC BioCRAFT News

Clemson University startup company earning rave reviews for improving implant sensors

Published: Thursday October 15, 2020

Aravis BioTech, a startup headed in part by Jeffrey Anker of the College of Science, is developing screws used in orthopedic surgery that employ easy-to-use sensors to determine the status of fracture healing.

The post Clemson University startup company earning rave reviews for improving implant sensors appeared first on Clemson News.


Statewide team lands five years of funding for biomedical research

Published: Wednesday October 02, 2019

A group of South Carolina researchers working on new treatments for a variety of illnesses ranging from diabetes to heart disease cheered the decision to grant five years of funding to a biomedical research center based at Clemson University. The National Institute of General Medical Sciences is providing $5.7 million to the South Carolina Bioengineering Center for Regeneration and Formation of Tissues. It’s the institute’s third round of competitive funding for the center, also called SCBioCRAFT.

The post Statewide team lands five years of funding for biomedical research appeared first on Clemson News.


Cause of vascular disease in kidney failure reversed in animal model

Published: Monday March 04, 2019

CLEMSON, South Carolina – By loading a chelation drug into a nano-sized homing device, researchers at Clemson University have reversed in an animal model the deadliest effects of chronic kidney disease, which kills more people in the United States each […]

The post Cause of vascular disease in kidney failure reversed in animal model appeared first on Clemson News.


Heart research gets $4.1 million boost on Valentine’s Day

Published: Thursday February 14, 2019

Valentine’s Day is a time to celebrate love and romance, but the holiday has also become an opportunity to promote heart health, a tradition that continues as Clemson University bioengineers announce the launch of two separate research projects.

Will Richardson and Naren Vyavahare said Thursday that they each have received grants from the National Institutes of Health for new research related to the heart. The two grants combined represent $4.1 million in new research funding in Clemson’s department of bioengineering.

The post Heart research gets $4.1 million boost on Valentine’s Day appeared first on Clemson News.


$11 million NIH grant creates new center for musculoskeletal research

Published: Thursday October 18, 2018

With an $11 million grant from the National Institutes of Health Center for Biomedical Research Excellence, Clemson University has launched the South Carolina Center for Translational Research Improving Musculoskeletal Health, or SC-TRIMH, a new research center that will bring together scientists from across South Carolina to change the way musculoskeletal disorders are diagnosed, treated and even studied.

The post $11 million NIH grant creates new center for musculoskeletal research appeared first on Clemson News.


Jess Machine

BREAKING NEWS!

Last year SCBioCRAFT purchased an automated Western Blot machine, the “Jess”, whose installation and usage it has been put on hold due to the COVID-19 restrictions. We are pleased to announce that we are now opening access to this machine.

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SC BioCRAFT Mission

We strive to find better treatments for human diseases by fostering interdisciplinary collaborations among researchers and enhancing interdependent intellectual capital and resources within the State of South Carolina.