Bioengineering

Bioengineering News

South Carolina Bioengineering Center to support translational research

SCBCCharleston
Architectural drawing of the bioengineering (left) and drug discovery (right) buildings at MUSC. The buildings, which are being built simultaneously, will be occupied by bioengineers in the summer of 2011.
Photo by Clemson bioengineering

The new South Carolina Bioengineering Center on the campus of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in Charleston will open its doors in June 2011 to members of the South Carolina Bioengineering Alliance.

Ground was broken is July 2009 for the 100,000 sq ft four-story building that will be connected to a drug delivery building of similar size.

The goals for the building are to support translational bioengineering research, development, education and technology transfer and to serve as a symbol to the state’s leadership in bridging disciplines, distances, and organizations in an effort to improve all aspects of quality of life.

Together, the joint bioengineering and drug delivery buildings will provide conference facilities for over 500 atendees and offices for the SC Bioengineering Alliance and the MUSC College of Graduate Studies . In addition to these offices, the first floor will host a bioengineering machine shop and microfabrication facility.

Two floors will exclusively support bioengineering research and education, with foci on biomaterials, stem cells, nanoscience, and small animal and molecular imaging. These floors will directly support the Clemson/MUSC Bioengineering Program and the South Carolina Center for Regenerative Medicine, which is composed of Center of Economic Excellence Endowed Chairs from Clemson, USC, and MUSC. The last floor will be dedicated to cancer research, specifically the fields of genetics and prevention control.

Through the connected drug delivery building, researchers will have direct access to resources for regenerative medicine and molecular biology research, cellular and molecular modeling and simulation, and imaging.