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Depression

Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness.1 It can be caused by imbalances in brain chemistry. Depression can also be triggered by stress, poor nutrition, physical illness, personal loss and school or relationship difficulties. Not everyone experiences depression in the same way. Depressed people may appear withdrawn and despondent or they may be aggressive and self-destructive. Some people may be depressed about a specific problem while others feel deeply unhappy without knowing why. Sometimes a depressed person may even appear “fine” to their friends and family. The common thread, however, is an overwhelming, persistent feeling of despair.2


  • Persistently sad, anxious, irritable or empty mood

  • Loss of interest in previously enjoyable activities

  • Withdrawal from friends and family

  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much

  • Fatigue and decreased energy

  • Significant change in appetite and/or weight

  • Overreaction to criticisms

  • Feeling unable to meet expectations

  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details and making decisions

  • Feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness or guilt

  • Persistent physical symptoms such as headaches, digestive problems or chronic pain that do not respond to routine treatment

  • Substance abuse problems

  • Thoughts of suicide or suicide attempts


ULifeline, Depression. (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Symptoms that interfere with ability to work, sleep, study and eat


Most of the time a person experiences multiples episodes in their lifetime


National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Depressed mood that lasts for at least two years


May have episodes of major depression along with periods of less severe symptoms, but symptoms must last for two years


National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Also known as manic-depressive


Characterized by cycling mood changes of highs (mania) and lows (depression)


Not as common as major depression or persistent depressive disorder


National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Due to hormonal and physical changes after giving birth; also the new responsibility of caring for a newborn can be overwhelming


10-15 percent of women experience after giving birth


National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Includes having disturbing false beliefs or a break with reality (delusions), or hearing or seeing upsetting things that others cannot hear or see (hallucinations)


National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Onset of depression during winter months


National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

Depression is highly treatable. There are many available methods to treat depression, including medication and/or counseling. If you or someone you know may be depressed, contact CAPS. People who are depressed sometimes think about suicide. It’s important to seek help immediately if you or someone you know is having these thoughts.2


Campus

Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)

CAPS, located in Redfern Health Center, provides a safe and confidential environment for students to address stressors and psychological needs that may occur during their time in college. An after-hours CAPS counselor is available and can be reached by calling the Clemson University Police Department at 864-656-2222 and asking for the CAPS counselor on call.


Appointments/Accessing Services

Services and Programs Offered by CAPS

CAPS Online Mental Health Screening

CAPS FAQs


Office of Advocacy and Success

CARE NetworkSubmit a CARE Report


Clemson University Police Department (CUPD) 

864-656-2222


Campus Recreation

Lead a healthy lifestyle and be active - check out all the fitness options on campus


Dining Services

Lead a healthy lifestyle and eat a balanced diet - know the nutritional content of your food and upcoming menus at the dining halls on campus


Local and National


American Psychiatric Association: Depression


Anxiety and Depression Association of America: Depression


MentalHealth.gov: Depression


National Alliance on Mental Illness: Depression


National Institute of Mental Health: What Is Depression?


National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 


Student Mental Health: A Guide to Identifying Disorders and Promoting Wellness


ULifeline: Depression 


ADDITIONAL MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

1National Institute of Mental Health, What Is Depression? (n.d.). Retrieved from URL

2ULifeline, Depression. (n.d.). Retrieved from URL