Small grains provide valuable double crop

By Peter Kent

wheatSmall grains provide a valuable second crop for South Carolina’s cotton, corn and soybean growers. Cool-weather crops such as soft winter wheat, oats, barley and triticale are grown on some 200,000 acres.

Growers seeking new varieties and improved production methods look to agronomist Ben Edge. He evaluates grain performance and adaptation to South Carolina at Clemson research farms on campus and at the Pee Dee Center in Florence and the Edisto Center in Blackville.

Pest management research focuses on resistance to Hessian flies and diseases such as powdery mildew, leaf rust and stripe rust. Results are published in guides that contain current and multiple year data for several standard varieties as well as new varieties of grain. The reports include yield, test weight, plant height and heading date and are available at www.clemson.edu/agronomy/VT/SmallGrain/smgrain.htm.




For information: Ben Edge, 864-656-3520, bedge@clemson.edu