Art in the Garden

Quilt

The Garden is a resource for South Carolina artists, musicians and performers, as well as internationally known sculptors. The Fuller Gallery at the Fran Hanson Visitor's Center houses a permanent collection of paintings by South Carolina native Elizabeth Belser Fuller, as well as the Featured Artists Gallery showcasing a rotating selection of mainly local artisans. The world-renowned Nature-based Sculpture program features installations throughout the Garden grounds.


The Fuller Gallery

Fuller

The Fuller Gallery features a collection of watercolors, mixed media and pen-and-ink drawings generously donated by a dear friend of the Garden, Mrs. Elizabeth Belser Fuller. After moving to Clemson, Mrs. Fuller created flower paintings on a weekly basis, then sold her paintings and donated 100% of the profits to the Garden. Her incredible collection from a life of painting includes pieces she made from 1947 to 1992. Mrs. Fuller passed away in January, 2009, but her legacy lives on in the Garden forever.

The Gallery, with its stunning views of the Garden grounds, is open daily, 10:00am to 5:00pm (closed on Clemson University holidays). Admission is free, and donations are welcome.


Featured Artists Gallery

The Featured Artist Gallery (part of the Fuller Gallery) showcases a rotating collection of artwork by artisans inspired by the materials, nature and beauty of the natural world. 

To be considered as a featured artist, send your name, photos of your work, artist's statement and bio to scbg@clemson.edu. Preference will be given to artists who are living in or are originally from Upstate South Carolina, as well as to work inspired by nature. Click here to see a list of past artists.


Nature-Based Sculpture Program

The Garden features one of the largest collections of nature-based sculptures in the country.  The extended-ephemeral pieces were each designed on-site by international artists and built within one month by local volunteers and students. Upon completion, the pieces began to return to nature, so while many may still be found in the Garden, others have disappeared without a trace. Learn more about the program here.