Vietnam War Bibliography:

The Huê Massacre

James Bullington, "And here, see Hue!", Foreign Service Journal, November 1968. Bullington, a foreign service officer, successfully remained hidden while the Communists were occupying Huê.

James O. clifford, "Forgotten Massacre at Hue." Vietnam Magazine, February 2002, pp. 26-32, 63.

(Joseph L. Dees?), "Communist Political Executions at Hue in the 1968 Tet Offensive--A Documented Report." 121 pp. This report has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in three parts: pp. 1-46, pp. 47-72, and pp. 73-121. The copy online has a date 3/68 marked in by hand, but this is inaccurate; internal evidence indicates it was probably written in 1970. My identification of Dees as the author is tentative. He was the JUSPAO correspondent in Saigon in 1968; later in the war he was writing stories about Communist atrocities as a correspondent for the International Press Service (IPS).

Omar Eby, A House in Hue. Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1968. By a Mennonite who was in Huê during the Tet Offensive.

Kenneth Gee, The Graves of Hue: A Short Study of the use of Terror as a political weapon by the Communists in South Vietnam. Sydney, Australia: The Friends of Vietnam, (1970?). The topic of this illustrated pamphlet is broader than the title suggests; much of it is a general denunciation of the Communists and those who sympathize with them. Kenneth Gee, a barrister in Sydney, Australia, was a leading figure in The Friends of Vietnam. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University.

Edward S. Herman and D. Gareth Porter, "The Myth of the Hue Massacre", Ramparts, May-June 1975.

Hue xuan 68. Hue: Thanh uy Hue, 1988. 353 pp.

Nha Ca, Giai khan so cho Hue. Saigon: Thuong-Yeu, 1969. 523 pp.

Douglas Pike, Hanoi's Strategy of Terror. Bangkok: South-East Asia Treaty Organization, 1970. 30 pp. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University.

Douglas Pike, The Viet Cong Strategy of Terror. Saigon: US Mission, 1970. 88 pp. This document has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in two parts: front matter and pp. 1-46, and pp. 47-88. There is also another version, paginated differently, dated February 1970. pp. 1-57, pp. 58-112, pp. 113-125 and back matter (primarily map).

D. Gareth Porter and Len E. Ackland, "Vietnam: The Bloodbath Argument," The Christian Century, November 5, 1969. pp. 1414-1417. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University. Discusses the details and particularly the timing of the Huê Massacre (what sorts of people were killed at what stage of the process). Argues that the killings occurred when the Communists realized they were losing control of the city, and did not appear to have been part of any plan the Communists had had when they initially took control. Therefore the killings did not constitute good evidence the Communists would carry out a bloodbath if they won control of the whole of South Vietnam. Information rebutting this article (or perhaps a summary of it that had appeared in The New York Times) was entered into the Congressional Record May 21, 1970, pp. 16502-16521, by Senator Gordon Allott of Colorado. An interchange between Allott and Barry Goldwater, in which Goldwater was making preposterous charges against the press, appears on pp. 16520-16521.

D. Gareth Porter, "The 1968 'Hue Massacre'", Indochina Chronicle, No. 33 (June 24, 1974), pp. 2-13. The text is available online as a slow-loading .pdf file and as a two-part .html file, part one and part two. This article also was reprinted in Congressional Record, 19 February 1975.

Alje Vennema, The Viet Cong Massacre at Hue. New York: Vantage Press, 1976. 212 pp. (See Herman & Chomsky, vol. 1, p. 433, n. 193, for doubts as to the reliability of this work.)

Works dealing with the military combat in Hue, as distinct from the massacre, can be found in The Climax: Tet and the Battle of Khe Sanh.

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Copyright © 1996, 1998, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, Edwin E. Moise. This document may be reproduced only by permission. Revised February 6, 2010. Opinions expressed in this bibliography are my own. They could hardly be the opinions of Clemson University, since Clemson University does not have opinions on the matters in question.