Vietnam War Bibliography:

U.S. Army Publications

The United States Army in Vietnam is to be the Army's formal official history of the war. Eighteen volumes are planned. The ones that have appeared so far are:


Vietnam Studies is made up of books on particular topics written by senior officers shortly after the war. Some volumes, at least, are now available from a private-sector publication-on-demand reprinter, Lightning Source. The series has also been included in a microfilm collection issued by a private sector publisher, titled Vietnam: Lessons Learned. The series includes:


The U.S. Army Campaigns of the Vietnam War is planned as a series of short volumes. One has been published so far.

Indochina Monographs is a series of books written after the war by men who had been senior officers in the armies of South Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. The whole series has also been issued on microfilm by a private sector publisher, under the title Indochina Studies. The copies usually found in libraries were published by the U.S. Army Center of Military History, in Washington. But some or all of them had previously been published by the General Research Corporation, of McLean, Virginia, apparently the company with which the Army had contracted to produce the series. In the ones I have checked, the substance was the same, but the pagination was sometimes different. The ones that have been placed on-line by the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, are are in most cases the General Research Corporation editions (though the one by Soutchay Vongsavanh is the Army edition). In the listing below, the dates and pagination reflect the Army editions:

John Albright, John A. Cash, and Allan W. Sandstrum, Seven Firefights in Vietnam.  Washington: GPO, 1970. viii, 159 pp. Each of the seven chapters is by one author; in the cases of chapters 1, 2, and 7, the author had been in some way involved with the action described. Chapter 1, by Cash, is on the battle at Landing Zone X-Ray, November 14-16, 1965. Chapter 2, by Albright, is about an incident of November 11, 1966, in which the VC 274th (Dong Nai) Regiment ambushed a large portion of the 1st Squadron of the 11th Armored Cavalry on Highway 1 between Long Binh and Xuan Loc. Chapter 7, by Cash, covers an action by U.S. Army helicopter gunships on the outskirts of Saigon, May 5, 1968. The text has been placed on-line by the Army, with all maps and illustrations but no index (I am pretty sure the printed version included an index, though I am not certain).
D 114.2:V 67

Army Activities Report: SE Asia. A weekly report, containing a lot of details that would be hard to find elsewhere. Looking at a random issue, that for 17 December 1969, I see lists of the officers occupying positions in Vietnam that include not only US Army officers down to province senior advisers and the commanders of maneuver battalions, but also the top commanders of the Thai, Korean, Australian, and New Zealand forces. Many issues between April 1969 and July 1970 are in the Army Heritage Collection Online.

Arsenal for the Brave: A History of the United States Army Materiel Command, 1962-1968. Historical Office, Headquarters U.S. Army Materiel Command, 1969. vi, 306 pp.
D 101.2:Ar 6/962-68

The Art and Science of Psychological Operations: Case Studies of Military Applications. 2 vols. Washington: Headquarters, Department of the Army, 1976. (Writing completed in 1972). DA PAM 525-7-1 and DA PAM 525-7-2. xxxvi, 1173 pp. The index is lousy; if you want to locate the articles on Vietnam, use the table of contents instead of the index, and keep in mind that any article with JUSPAO in the title is about Vietnam.

Andrew J. Birtle, U.S. Army Counterinsurgency and Contingency Operations Doctrine, 1942-1976. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History and GPO, 2006. xv, 570 pp.

Frederic L. Borch, Judge Advocates in Combat: Army Lawyers in Military Operations from Vietnam to Haiti. Washington: Office of the Judge Advocate General and Center of Military History, 2001. xix, 413 pp. Chapter 1, "Vietnam," is pp. 3-57.
D 114.2:J 89

Frederic L. Borch III, Judge Advocates in Vietnam: Army Lawyers in Southeast Asia, 1959-1975. Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College Press, 2003. x, 159 pp.

Border Security/Anti-Infiltration Operations. FM-31-55. Washington, DC: GPO, March 1972.

Lt. Col. Kenneth R. Bowra, "An Historical Study: The U.S. Army Vietnam Individual Training Group (UITG) Program, 1971-1973." Report written at the U.S. Army War College, 1991. 82 pp. A program under which U.S. Army Special Forces, Australian, and New Zealand personnel trained a large number of ARVN and Cambodian Army battalions between February 1971 and December 1972. The author was a participant from March to November 1972. To order from the National Technical Information Service, 1-800-553-6847, specify item ADA233669.

Romie L. Brownlee and William J. Mullen III, Changing an Army: An Oral History of General William E. DePuy, USA Retired.  Washington: Center of Military History, 1988. x, 209 pp.
D 114.2:Ar 5/3

Thomas A. Bruscino, Jr., Out Of Bounds: Transnational Sanctuary In Irregular Warfare. Global War on Terrorism Occasional Paper 17. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, 2006. ix, 109 pp. Deals with two case studies: the U.S. in Vietnam, and the Soviet Union in Afghanistan.

Major Bichson Bush, The Logic of Military Intelligence Failures. Ft. Leavenworth: School of Advanced Military Studies, 2001. v, 48 pp. The Easter Offensive of 1972 and the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990 are the main case studies.

Joseph R. Cerami and Jay W. Boggs, eds., The Interagency and Counterinsurgency Warfare: Stability, Security, Transition, and Reconstruction Roles. Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2007. xi, 605 pp. Not a lot about Vietnam.

Office of the Chief of Chaplains, Historical Review. One issue typically covers 12 to 18 months, and contains a dozen pages or so on the war in Vietnam. The 1965-66 issue is:
D 101.2:C 36/4/965-66

Michael Charles Conley, Communist Insurgent Infrastructure in South Vietnam: A Study of Organization and Strategy. DA PAM 550-106. GPO, 1967. xxii, 469 pp. I happened to read one very short chapter near the end, "The Acquisition of Party Membership" (pp. 214-16). That was bad enough to deter me from reading more.

B. Cooper, J. Killigrew, and N. LaCharité, Case Studies in Insurgency and Revolutionary Warfare: Vietnam 1941-1954. Washington: GPO, 1964.

Conrad C. Crane, Avoiding Vietnam: The U.S. Army's Response to Defeat in Southeast Asia. Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2002. vi, 25 pp.

Current Civil Affairs Trends, no. 13. Fort Gordon, Georgia: U.S. Army Civil Affairs School, September 1963. 53 pp. pp. 1-29 (of which the most important part, pp. 3-24, is "Civic Action in Laos: 1957-1959," by Brigadier General Oudone Sananikone, who had been Commissioner General of Civic Action of the Royal Lao Government during those years) and pp. 30-53 have been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University.

James T. Currie, Twice the Citizen: A History of the United States Army Reserve, 1908-1995, rev. ed.  DA PAM 140-14.  Washington: GPO, 1997.  704 pp.
D 101.22:140-14/998 (Clemson has this on fiche only)
(previous edition presumably D 101.22:140-14, but Clemson has put it in the main collection at UA42 .C76 1984).

Denial Operations and Barriers. FM 31-10. Washington, DC: GPO, September 1968.

Walter Scott Dillard, Sixty Days to Peace: Implementing the Paris Peace Accords, Vietnam 1973. Washington: National Defense University, 1982.  xiv, 240 pp.
D 5.402:P 31

Doctrine for Captured/Detained United States Military Personnel (USPOW). United States Army Combat Developments Command, Special Operations Agency, March 1972. ACN 15596. This series of reports has been placed online by governmentattic.org/.

Peter Dorland and James Nanney, Dust Off: Army Aeromedical Evacuation in Vietnam.  Washington: Center of Military History, 1982.  vi, 134 pp. The text (though without the index) has been placed online by eHistory.com.
D 114.2:D 94

John P. Finnegan, Military Intelligence: A Picture History. This is pretty brief, but the section on Vietnam contains some information.
D 101.2:In 8/6

John P. Finnegan, Military Intelligence.  Washington: Center of Military History, 1998.  (Army Lineage Series.)  xx, 437 pp.
D 114.11:In 8

1st Logistical Command, US Army Vietnam, Fact Book 1968. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in four parts: first part, second part, third part, and fourth part.

Lt. Gen. Jack C. Fuson, Transportation and Logistics: One Man's Story. Washington: Center of Military History, 1994. viii, 227 pp. As a Colonel, Fuson served a tour as commander of the 4th Transportation Command in Saigon, beginning July 1966. Later, he was MACV J-4 from January to December 1972.
D 114.2:T 68

James F. Gebhardt, Eyes Behind the Lines: US Army Long-Range Reconnaissance and Surveillance Units. Global War on Terrorism Occasional Paper 10. Ft. Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, (2006?). vi, 177 pp. Chapter 3, on Vietnam, is pp. 45-110.

James F. Gebhardt, The Road to Abu Ghraib: US Army Detainee Doctrine and Experience. Global War on Terrorism Occasional Papers #6. Ft. Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, 2005. vi, 143 pp. Chapter 5 (pp. 41-59) is a history, detailed enough to be useful, of US policy toward prisoners during the Vietnam War.

James L. Gilbert, The Most Secret War: Army Signals Intelligence in Vietnam. Fort Belvoir, VA: Military History Office, US Army Intelligence and Security Command, 2003. xi, 131 pp. Extensively illustrated.

Kendall W. Gott, Breaking the Mold: Tanks in the Cities. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, 2006. xii, 132 pp. Chapter 2 (pp. 23-45) covers the battle for Hue in 1968.

Lieutenant General Ernest Graves, Engineer Memoirs. Oral history interviews by Dr. Frank N. Schubert, February-April 1985. pp. 1-248, 249-256. Available online. Graves was in the Army Corps of Engineers. In the main text, see pp. 104-107 for his view of Vietnam policymaking in 1968, working in the office of Stanley Resor, Secretary of the Army, and pp. 108-119 for his Sep 1968 to Aug 1969 command of the 34th Engineer Group in Vietnam, initially based at Vung Tau, later at Can Tho. There is also an attached document (pp. 249-256), a set of responses written by then-colonel Graves on 11 July 1969 to questions about the situation, and engineer work, in the Mekong Delta.

Robert K. Griffith, Jr., The U.S. Army's Transition to the All-Volunteer Force, 1963-1974. Washington: Center of Military History, 1997. xiv, 306 pp.
D 114.19:V 88/2

Donald F. Harrison, Review of Army Command and Control Structure in Vietnam, tentative study report. OCMH-34. Unpublished manuscript (may in fact still be classified), Center of Military History, 1968. Approx 500 pp typescript.

Joseph M. Heiser, A Soldier Supporting Soldiers. Washington: Center of Military History, 1991. 323 pp. Autobiography of an Army general who specialized in logistics, and who commanded the 1st Logistical Command in Vietnam.
D 114.2:So 4/2

James M. Higgins, Misapplication of the Malayan Counterinsurgency Model to the Strategic Hamlet Program. Masters thesis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, 2001. vii, 84 pp.

Ian Horwood, Interservice Rivalry and Airpower in the Vietnam War. Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: Combat Studies Institute Press, 2006. vii, 200 pp.
D 110.11:In 8x

Franklin D. Jones, et al., eds., Military Psychiatry: Preparing in Peace for War. Washington, D.C.: Office of the Surgeon General, Borden Institute, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, 1994. (A volume in the series Textbook of Military Medicine.) Almost the whole text (though not, so far as I can tell, the index) has been placed online by the Army. Chapters with a particular relevance to Vietnam include Chapter 5: "Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Dependence", by Henry K. Watanabe, et al. (pp. 61-89); Chapter 8: "Ethical Challenges for the Psychiatrist during the Vietnam Conflict", by Norman M. Camp (pp. 133-150).

Col. William V. Kennedy, Press Coverage of the Vietnam War: The Third View. Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 1979. v, 88 pp. plus substantial appendices. (This was one part of a group study, "Strategic Lessons Learned in Vietnam.")

Danny M. Kelley, II, Misuse of the Studies and Observation Group as a National Asset in Vietnam. Masters thesis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, 2005. vi, 79 pp.

Richard E. Killblane, Circle the Wagons: The History of US Army Convoy Security. Global War on Terrorism Occasional Paper 13. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, (2006?). iv, 89 pp. Most of this is on Vietnam.

The Law of Land Warfare. Department of the Army Field Manual 27-10. The full text of the July 1956 version, with an appendix dated July 1976, making certain changes, is online at an Army web site. ix, 172 pp. There apparently were no changes made between 1956 and 1976. The changes made in 1976 included Paragraphs 5, 37, and 38 in regard to chemical and bacteriological warfare, herbicides, and riot control agents; and Paragraphs 39, 40, and 41 in regard to permissible targets of attack and bombardment, and unnecessary killing and devastation.

Legal Aspects of Internal Defense/Internal Development Operations. Charlottesvill, Virginia: The Judge Advocate General's School, U.S. Army, July 1967. 65 pp. This student study guide was a revision of a July 1964 version which apparently had been titled Legal Aspects of Counterinsurgency. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in two parts: pp. 1-49, and pp. 50-65. A later revision dated August 1968, 60 pp., has also been placed online, in two parts: pp. 1-49, and pp. 50-60. A later

Col. William E. LeGro, Vietnam from Ceasefire to Capitulation. Washington: Center of Military History, 1981. vi, 180 pp. Covers the period from 1973 to 1975. The text has been placed online by the Army as a large pdf, slow to load. The text in .html format, unfortunately without the maps and tables, has been placed on-line by The New York Military Affairs Symposium, in three parts: Foreword, Introduction, and Chapters 1-6;   Chapters 7-12; and Chapters 13-18. The text in .pdf format, with maps and tables, has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in four parts: front matter and pp. 1-44, pp. 45-94, pp. 95-144, and pp. 145-180.

Low-Intensity Conflict. FC [Field Circular] 100-20. Fort Leavenworth: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 16 July 1986. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in five parts: front matter, chapters 1-2, most of chapter 3 . . .
D 114.2:V 67/2

Charles V. P. Luttichau and Vincent Demma, Review of the Situation in South Vietnam 1956-1961, and its Relevancy to the Current Situation in Thailand. OCMH-6. Unpublished manuscript (may in fact still be classified), Center of Military History, 1966. 38 pp typescript.

Charles V. P. von Luttichau, The Growth of the U.S. Army Advisory Effort in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN), 1956-1965. OCMH-24. Unpublished manuscript (may in fact still be classified), Center of Military History, 1967. 14 pp typescript.

BG George L. Mabry, Jr., et. al. (ARCOV Evaluation Team), Evaluation of US Army Combat Operations in Vietnam. US Army, Vietnam, 1966.

Sanders Marble, Skilled and Resolute: A History of the 12th Evacuation Hospital and the 212th MASH, 1917-2006. Defense Dept., Army, Borden Institute, US Army Medical Center and School; and Office of the Surgeon General, 2013. 270 pp. The 12th Evacuation Hospital was at Cu Chi in III corps during the Vietnam War.

Brig. Gen. S.L.A. Marshall, USA, Ret., and Lt. Col. David H. Hackworth, USA, [Military Operations]: Lessons Learned: Vietnam Primer. DA PAM 525-2. Washington, D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army, 21 April 1967. vi, 55 pp. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in two parts: front matter and pp. 1-38, pp. 39-55.

"Masters of the Intelligence Art: John F. Stewart, Jr. and the Vigilant Eye of the Storm." Published electronically on the U.S. Army Military Intelligence Center Huachuca History Program web site. 35 pp. Stewart (and this article) sided with Westmoreland in the dispute over the strength of enemy forces in Vietnam in 1967. Stewart later was involved with Urgent Fury and Just Cause. The biggest portion of the article deals with Desert Storm.

"Masters of the Intelligence Art: Phillip B. Davidson, Jr. and Army Intelligence Doctrine." Published electronically on the U.S. Army Military Intelligence Center Huachuca History Program web site. 10 pp. The author of this article has a higher opinion than I do of Davidson, who was chief of the Plans and Estimates Branch of Douglas MacArthur's intelligence staff during the Korean War, and headed military intelligence in Saigon 1967-1969.

Maurice Matloff, ed., American Military History. Washington: Center of Military History, 1989 (previous editions 1959, 1969, 1973). This is the Army's basic history text. The whole text has been placed on-line at an Army web site; note in particular Chapter 28: The U.S. Army in Vietnam (pp. 619-693).

Mechanized and Armor Combat Operations in Vietnam. US Army, Vietnam, 28 March 1967. Report of the MACOV study, conducted from 6 January to 28 March 1967. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in four parts: front matter and pp. 1-85, pp. 86-185, pp. 186-203.

[Lt. Col.] Raymond Millen, The Political Context behind Successful Revolutionary Movements, Three Case Studies: Vietnam (1955-63), Algeria (1945-62), and Nicaragua (1967-79). Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, 2008. xii, 73 pp. I would look at this for insight into how the issues are viewed at the War College more than for insight into the actual history of the Vietnamese revolution.

Andrew R. Molnar, with Jerry M. Tinker and John D. LeNoir, Human Factors Considerations of Undergrounds in Insurgencies (DA PAM 550-104).  Washington: GPO, 1966.  x, 291 pp.
D 101.22:550-104

Bettie J. Morden, The Women's Army Corps, 1945-1978. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, United States Army, 2000. xix, 543 pp.
D 114.19:W 84

Office of the Chief of Chaplains, Historical Review. One issue typically covers 12 to 18 months, and contains a dozen pages or so on the war in Vietnam. The 1965-66 issue is:
D 101.2:C 36/4/965-66

Brigadier General Andre J. Ognibene and Colonel O'Neill Barrett, Jr., eds., Internal Medicine in Vietnam, volume II, General Medicine and Infectious Diseases. Washington, D.C.: Office of the Surgeon General and Center of Military History, United States Army, 1982. xxxi, 534 pp.
D 104.11/2:In 8/v. 2

Major William D. Palmer, "Time to Exorcise Another Ghost of the Vietnam War: Restructuring the In-service Conscientious Objectors Program", Military Law Review, spring 1993.
D 101.22:27-100-140

Program of Instruction for Military Assistance Training Advisor Course (MATA). Fort Bragg, NC: Unitd States Army Special Warfare School, April 1962. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project at Texas Tech University.

Psychological Operations: U.S. Army Doctrine. Washington: Headquarters, Department of the Army, June 1968. Field Manual 33-1. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project at Texas Tech University.

Psychological Operations: Techniques and Procedures. Washington: Headquarters, Department of the Army, January 1974. Field Manual 33-5. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in four parts: pp. 1-29, pp. 30-78, pp. 79-120, pp. 121-163.

Rebecca Robbins Raines, Getting the Message Through: A Branch History of the U.S. Army Signal Corps.  Washington: Center of Military History, 1996.  xix, 464 pp.
D 114.19:M 56

Robert D. Ramsey III, Advising Indigenous Forces: American Advisors in Korea, Vietnam, and El Salvador. Global War on Terrorism Occasional Paper #18. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, 2006. ix, 176 pp. Vietnam is pp. 27-81.

#19: Robert D. Ramsey III, ed., Advice for Advisors: Suggestions and Observations form Lawrence to the Present. Global War on Terrorism Occasional Paper #19. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute Press, 2006. v, 181 pp. Some essays deal with Vietnam, including "The District Advisor" (pp. 25-31), by Captain James F. Ray (published postuhumously after Captain Ray, the district advisor for Nha Be district, Gia Dinh province, was killed in action 9 January 1965; and "The American Military Advisor and His Foreign Military Counterpart: The Case of Vietnam" (pp. 119-180), by Dr. Gerald C. Hickey.

Jeffrey Record and W. Andrew Terrill, Iraq and Vietnam: Differences, Similarities, and Insights. Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, May 2004. vii, 69 pp.

Major Dale S. Ringler, How the North Vietnamese Won the War: Operational Art Bends but Does Not Break in Response to Asymmetry. Ft. Leavenworth: School of Advanced Military Studies, 2001. iii, 54 pp. Looking particularly at the Tet Offensive of 1968.

William B. Rosson, Assessment of Influence Exerted on Military Operations by Other than Military Considerations. Washington: Center of Military History, 1993. Originally written under General Rosson's direction in 1970, when he was Commander, U.S. Army, Pacific.

Lieutenant General Edward L. Rowny, Engineer Memoirs. EP 870-1-49. Alexandria, Virginia: Office of History, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1995. xvi, 214 pp. Oral history interviews. pp. 72-76 cover Rowny's service on the Howze Board evaluating the concept of airmobility. pp. 76-87 deal with his work as chief of the Army Concept Team in Vietnam (ACTIV), 1962-1963, evaluating the use of helicopters and other issues; he makes some very critical comments about the role of the press. full text available online.

LCDR Jason B. Scheffer, Rise and Fall of the Brown Water Navy: Changes in United States Navy Riverine Warfare Capabilities from the Vietnam War to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Masters thesis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, 2005. ix, 91 pp.

Paul J. Scheips, The Role of Federal Military Forces in Domestic Disorders, 1945-1992. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History and GPO, 2005. 512 pp.

John Schlight, ed., The Second Indochina War: Proceedings of a Symposium held at Airlie, Virginia, 7-9 November 1984. Washington: GPO & Center of Military History, 1986.
D 114.2:In 2

Thomas W. Scoville, Reorganizing for Pacification Support.  Washington: Center of Military History, 1982.  x, 89 pp.
D 114.2:P 11/2

Lt. Col. Charles R. Shrader, Amicicide: The Problem of Friendly Fire in Modern War. Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: Combat Studies Institute, US Army Command and General Staff College, 1982. xii, 146 pp. Shrader seems to be the Army's expert on amicide.

Charles R. Shrader, History of Operations Research in the United States Army, vol. 2, 1961-1973. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, 2008. 390 pp.
D 101.2:H 62/10/v.2

Lewis Sorley, ed., Press On! Selected Works of General Donn A. Strarry. 2 vols. Leavenworth, KS: Combined Studies Institute Press, 2009. xxiii, 1341 pp. The Vietnam War section is pp. 947-78,but there is considerable discussion of Vietnam elsewhere in the volumes. Volume I and Volume II are both available online.

Cecil E. Spurlock, The Fall of Vietnam. OCMH-137. Unpublished contract study, Center of Military History, 1978. 132 pp typescript. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in three parts. Most of the Chapter I "Before the Fall" and pp. 1-12 of Chapter II "The Central Highlands Campaign";   pp. 13-33 of Chapter II, and Chapter III "Hue, Danang, and the Central Coast";   Chapter IV "The Ho Chi Minh Campaign".

Colonel Richard M. Swain, compiler, Donald L. Gilmore and Carolyn D. Conway, eds., Selected Papers of General William E. DePuy. Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: Combat Studies Institute, (1995?). xv, 469 pp. Front matter and pp. 1-66;   pp. 67-156;   pp. 157-262;   pp. 263-338;   pp. 339-436;   pp. 437-469.

Col. Harry Summers, On Strategy: The Vietnam War in Context.  Washington: GPO/Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, 1981.  x, 137 pp.
D 101.2:V 67/2

Syllabus for Civil Affairs in the Cold War. 41-A-F6. Fort Gordon, Georgia: U.S. Army Civil Affairs School, (1961?). Syllabus for a four-week course, with summaries and suggested readings. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in four parts. Most of the first part and the first quarter of the second part are devoted to communism and the world communist movement, with a surprising recognition of Sino-Soviet differences.   Third part.   Fourth part.

Termination and Closeout of Southeast Asia Contracts. United States Army Western Command, Fort Shafter, Hawaii. 29 March 1979. Almost 200 pages in five sections, not paginated. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in four parts: first, second, third, fourth.

LCDR Charles A.P. Turner, American Leadership and Decision-Making Failures in the Tet Offensive. Masters thesis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, 2003. viii, 66 pp.

"The Uncertain Oracle: Some Intelligence Failures Revisited." Published electronically on the U.S. Army Military Intelligence Center Huachuca History Program web site. 18 pp. The cases considered include the Tet Offensive and the Son Tay POW rescue mission. Also, the discussion of Korea 1950 includes a comment that events in Indochina distracted the attention of U.S. intelligence away from Korea in the period before the outbreak of the Korean War.

Rodger R. Venzke, Confidence in Battle, Inspiration in Peace: The United States Army Chaplains, 1945-1975. Office of the Chief of Chaplains & GPO, 1977. pp. 137-176 deal with Vietnam.
D 101.2:C 36/5/v.5

Vietnam Information Booklet. Fort Sill, Oklahoma: United states Army Artillery and Missile School, November 1967. iii, 102 pp. (Material prepared by the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia.) The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in two parts: front matter and pp. 1-31; pp. 32-58 (Chapter 3, "US Advisory Effort," begins on p. 37; Chapter 4, "The Nature of the Enemy and His Operations," begins on p. 45; Chapter 5, "Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces and Military Government," begins on p. 57); pp. 59-84 (Chapter 6, US Forces Vietnam," begins on p. 63); pp. 85-102 (Chapter 7, "Revolutionary Development Program," begins on p. 91).

Erik Villard, The 1968 Tet Offensive Battles of Quang Tri City and Hue. Fort McNair, D.C.: U.S. Army Center of Military History. v, 82 pp.

Andrew R. Walton, History of the Airborne Forward Air Controller in Vietnam. Masters thesis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, 2004. viii, 88 pp.

Robert S. White, Anthropometric Survey of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Vietnam. Natick, MA: US Army Natick Laboratories, October 1964. v, 66 pp. Available from National Technical Information Service as item AD457939. A survey in June 1963 of 2,129 RVNAF personnel (401 Airborne Brigade, 303 5th Infantry Division, 306 7th Infantry Division, 215 Army recruits undergoing basic training at the Quang Trung Training Center, 299 Navy, 301 Marine Corps, and 304 Air Force), almost all enlisted or NCO. Mainly the survey was directed at physical characteristics, but there is useful data on matters such as age, place of birth, and religion.

LTC James H. Willbanks, USA (Ret.), Thiet Giap! The Battle of An Loc, April 1972. Ft. Leavenworth: Combat Studies Institute, 1993. xiii, 98 pp. The text has been placed on-line in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University, in three parts: Front matter and pp. 1-39, pp. 40-92, pp. 93-98. The Army has also put it online in five parts, but in a slightly more usuable format (keyword searchable) through a Combined Arms Center web page. Colonel Willbanks has also published a much more extended version of this study in the private sector; see under The Big War.

Army Journals

For each of the following journals, I have tried to provide a sample of the Vietnam-related articles I found, simply to illustrate the type of material in the journal. I have not tried to give comprehensive lists of all the Vietnam-related articles. In some cases, I have just listed the Vietnam-related articles in one or two randomly selected issues.

Armor. "The Magazine of Mobile Warfare", "The Professional Bulletin of the Armor Branch", or "The Professional Journal of Mounted Warfare". Fort Knox, Kentucky: U.S. Army Armor School, later U.S. Army Armor Center. This started as a cavalry journal in 1888, and changed names several times before becoming Armor in 1950. Issues since 1995 were for several years available on-line to the general public at the Armor web site, but this access is now blocked so firmly that articles are retroactively blocked on the Wayback Machine. The journal is currently available online to military personnel through the Army Knowledge Online system. Some recent issues are available to many academics through their university libraries' web systems. Some issues are available through other channels.
D 101.78/2:

Army Digest. "The Official Magazine of the Department of the Army" This publication was called Army Information Digest up to 1966, Army Digest from 1966 to 1971, and Soldiers from June 1971 onward. Issues since 1994 are available online at the Soldiers Archive.
D 101.12:

Army History: "The Professional Bulletin of Army History" Fort McNair, D.C.: U.S. Army Center of Military History. A typical issue has a couple of long articles, not a lot of short ones. Recent issues available online. Call number, on level 3 of the library,
D 114.20:

The Army Lawyer. Published by the Judge Advocate General's School, Charlottesville, Virginia, beginning in August 1971. All issues are available online through the Library of Congress.

Army Logistician. "The Official Magazine of United States Army Logistics." Fort Lee, Virginia: U.S. Army Logistics Management Center. Publication began in 1969; Clemson does not have holdings before 1973, and holdings are spotty after that. The number of articles dealing with Vietnam is smaller than one might expect. All issues, right back to 1969, are available online at Army Logistician. But downloading individual articles, as huge .PDF files, may be a bit slow.
D 101.69:

Artillery Trends. Fort Sill, Oklahoma: U.S. Army Artillery and Missile School. Published irregularly, whenever enough articles had been accumulated to make up an issue. Articles during the Vietnam War often were clearly about Vietnam, dealing with techniques of providing artillery support to troops in a jungle environment, and so on, but tended not to use the word "Vietnam." This publication is available online through the Field Artillery archives page, which is nicely set up; you can choose to access either an entire issue in a very large .pdf file, or an individual article.

Aviation Digest. Fort Rucker, Alabama: U.S. Army Aviation School.
D 101.47:

Field Artillery. Fort Sill, Oklahoma: U.S. Army Field Artillery School. This journal has been published under this name since mid 1987. Previously It has been published under various other titles intermittently since 1911. See Artillery Trends ( -1968, above); The Field Artilleryman (1969-1972, below); Field Artillery Journal (1973 to mid 1987, below). All issues are available online through the Field Artillery archives page, which is nicely set up; you can choose to access either an entire issue in a very large .pdf file, or an individual article. Also it has a pretty decent search engine.

The Field Artillery Journal. This was the title used from 1973 to mid 1987 by the publication today called Field Artillery, published at the Field Artillery School at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Back issues (published under various titles since 1911) are available online through the Field Artillery archives page, which is nicely set up; you can choose to access either an entire issue in a very large .pdf file, or an individual article.

The Field Artilleryman. This was the title used from 1969 to 1972 by the publication today called Field Artillery, published at the Field Artillery School at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. It had been Artillery Trends (see above) up through 1968. Back issues (published under various titles since 1911) are available online through the Field Artillery archives page, which is nicely set up; you can choose to access either an entire issue in a very large .pdf file, or an individual article. There were a fair number of articles on artillery weapons and techniques used in Vietnam; see for example

Infantry. Fort Benning, Georgia: U.S. Army Infantry School. Tables of contents for issues since 1982, with actual links to the texts of articles in issues since 1988, were once available to the public on the Infantry web site. But now this material is open only to users having a userid and password in the Army's system.
D 102.83:

Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin. Fort Huachuca, Arizona: U.S. Army Intelligence Center. Some issues used to be available online at a U.S. Army web site, but this appears no longer to be the case. Some have been placed online at a website of a private-sector organization, the Federation of American Scientists.
D 101.84:

Military Law Review. Published by the Judge Advocate General's School, Charlottesville, Virginia, beginning in September 1958. All issues are available online through the Library of Congress. This is a law journal, so the articles discuss what the law is. Don't expect articles discussing what life and day-to-day work are like for Army lawyers in Vietnam.

Military Review. "Professional Journal of the US Army." Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. Publication began in 1922. I used to have links to individual articles. A recent reorganization of the Army web site on which back issues are stored invalidated those links, but created a gateway at the Combined Arms Research Library Digital Library through which each past issue was available as a single large .pdf file. There should still be some route by which individual articles are available, perhaps going through the Army's Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL), but I haven't found it yet.
D 110.7:

Parameters. "Journal of the U.S. Army War College." Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania: U.S. Army War College. Publication began in 1971; Clemson's holdings begin 1977.
D 101.72:


 

UpTight. The quarterly of the United States Army, Vietnam. So far as I have found, only one issue has been placed online in the Virtual Vietnam Archive of the Vietnam Project, at Texas Tech University.


 

Numerous U.S. Army documents available online, formerly listed on this page, have been moved to locations such as Airborne and Airmobile, U.S. Soldiers on the Ground, and U.S. Army Helicopter Unit Documents.

 

The Ground War: Private Sector Publications

Return to Table of Contents

Reference Works Published by the U.S. Army

Copyright © 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, Edwin E. Moise. This document may be reproduced only by permission. Revised September 2, 2014.