Department of Automotive Engineering

FAQs - Automotive Engineering Academics

What makes this program different?
How much does the program cost?
Do I really need an advanced degree to work in the automotive industry?

What makes this program different?
There are a number of things that make Clemson's automotive engineering program different. First, automotive engineering is not just one of many concentration areas available to our students; our entire program is built around the discipline. Using guidance from our industry advisory board, we have developed a curriculum that allows us to prepare our graduates for the challenges and opportunities they will face in the real world.

Secondly, our program houses a psychologist, computer scientist, and business expert integrated with the engineering program. This gives students an appreciation for the importance of human factors, HMI, and business principles in vehicle design and development.

Our location at CU-ICAR, and advanced-technology research campus, also makes us different and gives students the benefit of proximity to some of the industry's leading companies.

How much does the program cost?
For current fee information, visit http://www.grad.Clemson.edu/Programs/tuition.php and look for “Automotive Engineering” under the College of Engineering and Science.

Do I really need an advanced degree to work in the automotive industry?
It’s hard to answer this question without knowing what type of job you are interested in. Due to the increasingly complexity found within the automotive industry, there is a trend to hire those with advanced degrees.

Our graduates tell us that having an advanced degree has given them an advantage when progressing in their careers. This is especially true for those interested in management roles.

Don’t take our word for it. When interviewed for a May 2012 article in the New York Times, Giorgio Rizzoni, director of the Center for Automotive Research at The Ohio State University, said “Our observation is, the auto industry likes to hire people with an advanced degree who have been exposed to a broad level of disciplines.” For the full article text, see http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/20/automobiles/cramming-for-degrees-in-hybrids.html?pagewanted=all